Home

What's New

Photo of the Month

Minerd.com Blog

Biographies

National Reunion

Interconnectedness

Cousin Voices

Honor Roll

In Lasting Memory

In the News

Our Mission and Values

Annual Review

Favorite Links

Contact Us

 

Johann 'Herman' Junghen
(1720-1788)

 

Johann "Herman" Junghen was born in 1720 in Germany. His parents, as identified by the late Donna (Younkin) Logan, were Johannes and Elisabeth (Wagner) Junghen of the town of Niederasphe in Hesse.

In German legend, the name "Hermann" is revered, dating to 9 AD. The ancient Hermann was a fierce warrior who rallied Germanic tribes into a unified force to stop a Roman invasion in the Teutonburg Forest. Thanks to Hermann, writes Neil MacGregor in Germany: Memories of a Nation, "a nation was born out of resistance..." For many ensuing centuries Hermann's persona created deep patriotic stirrings within the German soul for a nation that did not yet exist. These longings moved romantic painters to create powerful images of dark, forbidding forests and the Brothers Grimm to collect and write beloved folktales in the German tongue. Today, a 90-feet-high bronze statue of Hermann stands near Detmold, and a marble statue in the Walhalla, the massive hall of heroes in Bavaria above the Danube.

And so our Herman was honorably named. As a teenager, in 1837, he migrated from the Palatinate section of Germany to the American colonies, sailing on the ship Charming Nancy, sometimes referred to as the Charming Polly. The vessel is known to have arrived in port in Philadelphia on Oct. 8, 1837. 

He settled 40 miles north of Philadelphia in Tinicum Township, Nockamixon Township, Bucks County, PA. At some point he acquired a farm of about 100 acres.

In about 1741, Herman first was united in matrimony with Magdalena ( ? - ? ), said to have been of French/Bourbon origin.

The seven known offspring of this couple were John Junghen, Abraham Junghen Sr., Daniel Junghen, George Junghen, twins Herman Junghen Jr. and Magdalena Junghen, and Maria Catharina Haupt.

Herman became a naturalized citizen of England in 1743. He retained this citizenship for three-plus decades, until the United States was formed through the Declaration of Independence and outbreak of the American Revolution. He then took an oath of allegiance to the new nation in Philadelphia in the summer of 1777 or in 1778.

Circa 1750, Herman's elder brother Johann Heinrich made his own ocean voyage and came to Philadelphia, also putting down roots in Bucks County.  

Herman's second wife was Eva (Kressler) Shill ( ? - ? ), widow of George Shill. Their marriage took place sometime after 1749.

Two children produced by the second marriage was Killian Junghen/Youngken, born in 1780, and a daughter who wed (?) Ileff/Eyliff and relocated to Canada.  

Early view of the port of Philadelphia.  - Courtesy Google Books


Herman purchased a farm of 89 acres, with the tract surveyed in his name on Dec. 3, 1754. This fact is noted in the book The History of Bucks County, authored by William Watts Hart. In the entry, his name is spelled "Younghon." The tract was sited on the Durham road and extended south into the upper end of Bucksville and later was inherited by grandson John Nicholas Youngken and then in 1792 acquired by Nicholas Buck.

Book naming Herman
Courtesy Google Books
As well, Herman and his neighbors are prominently mentioned in the book Account of the Buck Family of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, edited by William J. Buck (Philadelphia, 1893). 

It can now be regarded as somewhat remarkable as the records prove that the Youngkens, Overpecks, Pearsons, Bucks, Gruvers, Frankenfields, Pursells, Hoffmans, Zeigenfooses, Zeiglers, Clemmers and some others originally settled in Springfield, and later their descendants moved southwards on the line of the Haycock Run valley and the old Durham road, instead of having arrived from below, as would have been generally expected. This was brought about through the arrival of the early immigrants at Philadelphia, proceeding up the valleys of the Schuylkill and Perkiomen, and from thence either moving directly eastwards or higher up by a semicircle southeastwards into the township of Springfield, and then later into Nockamixon and Haycock. This can be readily understood, that on a direct line from Philadelphia to Reading and to the eastward of the same was much earlier settled by the Germans than the adjacent parts of northern Bucks county, thus first following the direction of improvement and subsequently wheeling around eastwards to secure wild or unoccupied lands at lower rates, which to an industrious and frugal people with limited means was an object.

The family belonged at one time in the Nockamixon Lutheran Church, but Herman's membership privileges were revoked in 1766. The church elders did grant him the right to attend services.

The Durham Road next to the Youngken farm in 1732 is known to have been extended north from Bristol to Newtown, through Buckingham and on to the Tohickon Creek. It was lengthened again 14 years later through Bucksville and Stony Point to Durham Furnace. Then in 1755, it was cut through to the Lehigh River at Easton. "These facts are interesting and go to show that the first settlements in Nockamixon must have been made between the years 1738 and 1750," wrote Buck. "The McCartys were here in 1743, if not, somewhat earlier, Peter Keyser before 1750, and Herman Youngken and George Overpeck four years later; we possess no evidence to this date of others having preceded them in this vicinity... Another road was laid out from Herman Youngken's house on the Durham Road by way of 'the German meeting house,' now St. Luke's Church, to Gallows Run, thence to the river Delaware. The Court, in September, 1767, ordered it to be speedily opened. Herman Youngken resided nearly half a mile above the present village and said road extended eastwardly through where is now Kintnersville."

Herman placed an announcement in the Pennsylvania Gazette in June 1769 that a black mare had strayed or been stolen from his farm at Nockamixon. The mare was four years of age, and:

...paces, trots, and hand gallops, fhod before, with old fshoes, has a remarkable running wart at the root of h er near ear, light bodied, and about 14 hands high. Whoever takes up faid mare and thief, fo that the owner may have her again, and the thief brought to jufstice, fhall have FOUR POUNDS reward, or Twenty Shillings for the mare only, and reafonable charges, paid by THOMAS BARTON, in New Britain townfhip, or faid HARMAN YOUNGKIN.

He died in Nockamixon on Feb. 28, 1788. His sons Abraham and Killian jointly inherited the farm, and with Abraham already deceeased, his son Abraham Jr. sold his share to Killian. 

Eva's fate is not yet known. In an interesting twist, the author Buck added this in his history: 

The early settlers excepting the McCartys were from Germany. Very few are found who cannot speak both English and German. The latter as spoken may be regarded as rather a dialect and to be despised by critics, yet we feel proud of it, and with our limited vocabulary of the English, we are enabled to converse with all whom we come in contact with, while our English brethren for the want of a knowledge of any other must confine themselves entirely to their own language.

Herman's will and other Bucks County and church records were researched circa 1937 by Anita L. Eyster, a double Youngken and member of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. These findings were summarized and published in the Christmas 1937 edition of the  Younkin Family News Bulletin. Many years later, her records were donated by her heirs to the Spruance Library and Museum in Doylestown, Bucks County. She was the great-granddaughter of John and Anna "Elizabeth" (Youngken) Houpt, he the Johann "Heinrich" Junghen line and she of the Herman line. In 1941, she wrote a letter published in the YFNB, saying: 

I wish I had something that could be of use to you in the News Bulletin but I know of nothing that would help. Of course my personal interest in the family stops with the death of my greatgrandfather's wife, Elisabeth Youngken, in 1831... My activities in the past few years have been largely in lines far removed and not often amongst the German element. Really genealogical work is very slow at present and when I have no very active clients I busy myself with research in Philadelphia and nearby. I live very quietly since my children are all married and out of the city but I have a comfortable house and few cares and I take life easy and try to view approaching old age with equanimity.

At least eight of his direct descendants bore the name "Herman." 

~ Son John Youngken ~

Son John Youngken (1743- ? ) was born in about 1743 in Philadelphia.

On March 12, 1771, he entered into marriage with Anna Maria Essig ( ? - ? ), a name Americanized to "Essey." Their wedding ceremony was held in St. Michael's Zion Church in Philadelphia.

Seven known offspring of this union were John "Nicholas" Junghen, John "Michael" Junghen, Abraham Junghen, Anna Catharine Junghen, John Junghen, Mary Magdalena Seip, Elizabeth Junghen and Margaret Hoffman/Huffman. It's possible that Anna Catharine wed Conrad Lotroe.

He was said to have been a blacksmith but to have made farming his primary occupation. According to an 1899 book of Bucks County biographies, reprinted in a 1938 edition of the Younkin Family News Bulletin, "he erected a log house and sawmill, both of which were still in good condition, and are landmarks of the district; he cleared the land and carried on agricultural pursuits the remainder of his active days."

In the years 1788 to 1798, he held a seat as a trustee of the Nickamixon Lutheran Church.  

John's second wife was Barbara Wimmer ( ? - ? ).

The second marriage's only son was David Youngken. At David's baptism, performed in April 1804 by Rev. Mensch, they received a baptismal certificate written in German and later republished in the Younkin Family News Bulletin: "Diesen beyden ehegatten als Eohanes Eunchen und seiner ehalichen hausfrau eina geborne Wimmer is ein schalein zur welt geboren als David ist zur welt geboren em eahr unsers herrn easu 1804 den 5ten tag Aprill um 5 uhr morgens em zeichen de ist getauft worden von pfarren mensch sina tauf zengen warren Jacob Funk und seine ehe frau Susanna."

The English translation of the baptismal certificate was: "The two untied persons John Youngkin and his united wife a born Wimmer; a son is born called David, is born in the year of our Lord 1804, the 5th day of April at 5 o'clock in the morning, was baptized by Rev. Mensch and his godfather and godmother were Jacob Funk and his wife, Susanna."

John is said to have served in the Revolutionary War as a member of the Nockamixon Township company of militia. On one occasion, while in a camp near home, he and his fellow militiamen were drinking and gambling when discovered by John's father-in-law, Mr. Wimmer. According to a story told by a grandson, Josiah Youngkin:

...an argument ensued, which ended by John striking Mr. Wimmer and knocking him down. After this incident he left for parts unknown, never to return. He was supposed to have gone to Luzerne County, and engaged in mining of coal and, to have acquired considerable wealth, when he died he owned valuable coal lands. It was said of him, that he married bigamously a woman named McLaughlin by whom he had two children. 

In 1899, grandson Josiah G. Youngken attempted to lay claim to the coal lands in Luzerne, generating an article in the Philadelphia Times. The story said that the grandson:

...lives in a frame mansion, near Applebachville, on the road leading from Richlandtown to the Bethlehem road, in Bucks county... Mr. Youngken's fight for the property will be based on the following allegations, which he says he is ready to prove: His grandfather, Youn Youngken, married Barbara Wimmer and, many years ago lived in Richlandtown, but mysteeriously disappeared. He is reported to have gone to New Jersey, thence to Easton, and finally to have settled in Luzerne county, where he purchased more than 300 acres of coal land, from which fields more than 1,000,000 tons of coal have since been mined, and which are estimated to be worth at present $5,000 an acre. John is reported to have there married and shortly afterward died. The heirs to his estate tried to settle, but the Easton branch of his family would not lay any claim to the estate. John Youngken had two children by his first wife, a son David, the father of Josiah, being one of them. No divorce has evern been recorded between John Youngken and his wife Barbara. Many of the old residents of Richlandtown remember the sudden disappearance of John Youngken, but as railroad, telegraph and mails were little used or not property constructed, the missing man could not be traced. Josiah Youngken has in his possession an old Bible which belonged to his father, DAvid, and gives the date and place of birth, and also the marriage certificate of his great-grandfather, John Youngken. 

He was deceased by 1829.  

More than a century later, John and Anna Maria were named in articles in the Christmas 1937 and April 30, 1938 editions of the Younkin Family News Bulletin.

Son John "Nicholas" JunghenYounkin (1772-1848) was born on Feb. 21, 1772. He was baptized in infancy in the Old Williams Lutheran Church by Rev. Nicholas Mensch. He is believed to be the same "John Nicholas Youngken" who, according to William J. Buck's 1893 book Account of the Buck Family of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, purchased his grandfather Youngken's farm in 1790 and sold it two years later. Having learned that he could harness the power of the moving water of Haycock Run, he built the framework for a new sawmill. Then in 1792, when he bought a tract of land on Haycock Run about a mile away, from sellers Rev. Peter and Catharine Ohl, he took the framework along and erected the first water-powered sawmill in that vicinity. Wrote Buck: "This property has been since continuously in the family. The Youngken homestead above Bucksville has of recent years been known as the Lacey farm, which previously had been long in the possession of the Fenner family and later of Alfred Buck now of South Bethlehem. In September and October 1814, he and his brother Abraham are believed to have served in Captain Wilson's Bucks County Company at Marcus Hook for the defence of Philadelphia during the War of 1812. John Nicholas first was joined in marital union with Catherine Verity ( ? - ? ). Three children were borne of this union -- Nicholas Younken, Maria Fischler and Jane Sterner. Sadly, Catherine died before 1814. He was united in matrimony with his second wife, Mary Elizabeth Young ( ? - ? ), by the hand of Rev. Mensch. Their children were John Younkin, Mary Younkin, Julia Ann Kohl, Catherine Ann Zoellner/Selner, Henry Herman Younkin, Abraham Youngken, Herman Younkin and Jesse Younkin. Nicholas served at some point as a trustee of the Haycock Run schoolhouse in Springfield, located 100 yards north of the Haycock and Nockamixon Township border, along the road from Stony Point to Applebachsville. Built in 1822, wrote Buck, 

It was a substantial stone structure, twenty-two feet square, containing five windows, with three of the sides containing desks, for the accommodation of the larger pupils, while the smaller ones were obliged to sit on rude benches constructed of slabs. The teacher had for his use a large oak chair and a medium sized table for a desk. The stove was of huge dimensions, admirably calculated for burning hickory wood. Owing to its location through the enforcement of the school laws it remained vacant and finally went to ruins about 1860 and by 1884 its materials were all removed so that the spot is no longer visible to a stranger passing that way. Among the teachers that taught here were "Billy" Smith, "Old Davie" from York State, Henry S. Afflerbach of Springfield; Isaac McCarty and Isaac McIntyre, of Nockamixon; Mr. Fabian, Dr. John Hoot, of Haycock; Petit Burson, of Bursonville, and Thomas Miller, of Stony Point. Among the trustees were Nicholas Youngken, Frederick Selner, Samuel Fluck, William Campbell, Jacob E. Buck and John E. Mondau. 

Mary is said to have passed away in Reigelsville, Bucks County at the age of 86 on Jan. 3, 1883. Not all of the dates are in alignment in this family and need to be verified. John Nicholas' sawmill is said to have been rebuilt several times, and a plank bridge over Haycock Run was constructed at the site of the mill during the Civil War in 1863.

  • Grandson Nicholas Younken (1818-1912) was born on Oct. 27, 1818. He was a lifelong bachelor, and earned his keep as a farmer and lumberman, keeping possession of his father's real estate. In 1880 and 1900, he lived in the household of his married brother Henry. In 1889, Nicholas and his brother Henry among others signed a petion to establish Bridgeton Township from its parent Nockamixon Township in Bucks County, as cited in the 1905 book History of Bucks County, Volume 2, by William W.H. Davis. Nicholas congracted "la grippe" (influenza) and congestion of the lungs and died in Nockamixon Township on March 11, 1912, at the age of 93. The aged remains were interred in Durham, PA.
  • Granddaughter Maria Younken (1817-1872) was born in about 1817. She wed Gottfried Fischler (1801-1854), also spelled "Godfrey Fishler," of Trenton, NJ. The couple is believed to have produced four offspring, Joseph Fishler, Mary Fishler, Sarah Daubert and Almeira/Elmira Fishler. The federal census of 1850 shows the couple in Easton, Northampton County, with Gottfried laboring for a living. In the household that year were daughters Sarah and Elmira as well as Reuben and Susan Gardner, Joseph Gardner, Mary and Justine McCartney. Research by others gives Gottfried's date of death as July 24, 1854, in Easton, with interment in Easton Cemeteery. If so, Maria lived for the next 18 years as a widow. She dwelled under the Easton roof of son-in-law and daughter Amandus and Sarah Daubert in 1860. The spirit of death carried her away in Easton in Aug. 1872.  

    Great-grandson Joseph Fishler (1824-1903) was born on Jan. 28, 1822 in Easton and must have been a stepson of Maria's. He died at the age of 81, in Trenton, NJ, in Dec. 1903. His remains were laid to rest in Easton Cemetery.

    Great-granddaughter Mary Fishler (1832- ? ) was born on Oct. 15, 1832.

    Great-granddaughter Sarah Fishler (1834-1920) was born on April 4, 1834 in West Easton, Northampton County. She entered into marriage with Amandus A. Daubert (1830-1906). Four known offspring of this union were Edwin Forrest Daubert, Thomas Daubert, Clara Thompson, Elmira Stamets, Augustus Daubert, Joseph Daubert and Roscoe Daubert. The family dwelled in Easton in 1860-1906. Sadly, Amadus died on July 6, 1906, with an obituary printed in the Allentown Morning Call. Death enveloped her in Philipsburg, Warren County, NJ in May 1920. Her remains were brought to Easton to sleep eternally in Easton Cemetery.

    Great-granddaughter Almeira/Elmira Fishler (1842- ? ) was born on Dec 16, 1842. She appears to have been baptized on Sept. 15, 1849. 

  • Granddaughter Jane Youngken (1804-1847) was born on Jan. 30, 1804 in Bucks County. She was united in the bonds of matrimony with John Sterner ( ? - ? ). The identified children of this brood were Ephraim Sterner, Elisabeth Sterner, Josiah Sterner, Barbara Ann Sterner, Janet Sterner, John Sterner and William Sterner. Sadness cascaded over the family when Jane died of fever at the age of 43 on Sept. 26, 1847. Burial was in Easton's St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Cemetery.

    Great-grandson Ephraim Sterner ( ? - ? )

    Great-granddaughter Elisabeth Sterner ( ? - ? )

    Great-grandson Josiah Sterner ( ? - ? )

    Great-granddaughter Barbara Ann Sterner ( ? - ? )

    Great-granddaughter Janet Sterner ( ? - ? )

    Great-grandson John Sterner ( ? - ? )

    Great-grandson William Sterner ( ? - ? )

  • St. Paul's, Applebachsville. 
    Courtesy Donna (Younkin) Logan
    Grandson John Youngken (1815-1891) was born on April 3, 1815. He tied the marital knot with Maria Kressler (Feb. 10, 1811-1860). Four offspring of this family were Emmy Leonard, Mary Jane Youngken, John Jerome Youngken and Emaline Youngken. Sadly, Maria died at the age of 49 on April 14, 1860. John outlived her by more than three decades. He passed away at the age of 76 on April 9, 1891. Burial was in Durham Union Cemetery.

    Great-granddaughter Emma "Emmy" Youngken (1839-1873) was born in about 1839. She married L. Leonard ( ? - ? ). Death swept her away at the age of 34 years, six months and 21 days on April 17, 1873. Her remains were laid to rest in Saint Pauls Evangelical Lutheran Cemetery, Applebachsville, Bucks County. Her marker was photographed in the 1990s by cousin and researcher Donna (Younkin) Logan.

    Great-granddaughter Mary Jane Youngken ( ? - ? ) -- did she marry Frederick H. Koch ( ? - ? ) of Philadelphia on June 11, 1867, by the hand of Rev. W.S. Emery, as reported in the Bucks County Intelligencer?

    Great-grandson John Jerome Youngken (1845- ? ) was born in 1845 in Springfield Township, Bucks County.

    Great-granddaughter Emaline Youngken (1850- ? ) was born in 1850 in Springfield Township, Bucks County. 

  • Granddaughter Mary Younkin (1821- ? ) was born in Nov. 1821. She was joined in wedlock with John Musselman ( ? - ? ). The pair has not yet been located in the U.S. Census of 1850.
  • Granddaughter Julia Anna "Juliann" Younkin (1823-1907) was born in July 1823. She entered into marriage with John Kohl (1817?-1889?). Their two known children were Henry Franklin Kohl and (?) Arthur. Evidence hints that John died in Durham, Bucks County on May 18, 1889. Julia's final address was with her granddaughter Mrs. Stewart Long in Easton at 1113 Ferry Street. Stricken with cancer of the left arm, and problems with her salivary glands, at the age of 84, she surrendered to the angel of death on Sept. 1, 1907. Mrs. Arthur, of Easton, provided key details for the official Pennsylvania certificate of death. The remains were laid to rest in Durham Cemetery. An obituary was published in the Allentown Morning Call.

    Great-grandson Henry Franklin Kohl (1846-1934) was born on Nov. 24, 1846. He wed Amelia Reichert Fulmer (Oct. 4, 1849-1935), daughter of Leidy Fulmer. They dwelled in Durham, Bucks County. At the age of 87, Henry died from the effects of chronic heart valve disease on July 31, 1934. Amelia survived for fewer than six months. Also having developed chronic heart valve disease, death overtook her on Jan. 10, 1935. Interment was in Durham Cemetery. Edward A. Unangst of Durham signed the death certificate.

    Great-granddaughter (?) Kohl married John Arthur. Their residence in 1907 was in Easton. 

  • Pleasant Hill Cemetery. Courtesy Tom Myers
    Granddaughter Catherine Ann Younkin (1826-1913) was born on July 19, 1826 or 1829 in Nockamixon Township, Bucks County. When she was 38 years of age, on Nov. 8, 1867, she wed Charles Zoellner (1833 ? ), also spelled "Zelner," "Sellner" and "Selner," a native of Springfield Township, Bucks County, and the son of Sarah Zoellner. Rev. D. Rothrock presided, with the news reported in the Bucks County Intelligencer. One known son of this later-life union was John Nicholas Selner. The federal census enumerations of 1870 and 1880 show the family in Springfield, with Charles toiling as a farmer. By 1900, the  Selners had moved to Freemansburg, Northampton County, with the census-taker recording his occupation as "capitalist." They remained in Freemansburg to the end. Sadly, Charles died at the age of 73 on Dec. 18, 1904. Catharine outlived him by nine years. Suffering from what a doctor called "cerebral softening," she was felled by a heart attack and, after 55 days, passed into the arms of the angelic host on Dec. 18, 1913. The informant for her death certificate was P.A. Bergstresser of Hellertown, PA. Burial was in Pleasant Hill Cemetery in Bucks County.

    Great-grandson John Nicholas Zelner/Sellner/Selner (1869-1956) was born on the Fourth of July 1869 in Springfield Township, Bucks County. At the age of 30 in 1900, still a bachelor, he lived with his parents in Freemansburg and worked in a merchandise and feed store. He is believed to have been united in matrimony on Jan. 20, 1908, with Ellamina Nicholas ( ? - ? ), a resident of Northampton Heights. Rev. E.R. Jaxheim presided at the ceremony in Christ Lutheran Church in Freemansburg, with the marriage announced on the pages of the Philadelphia Inquirer. They were longtime farmers and belonged to the Trinity Evangelical and Reformed Church in Springfield Township. His name generally appears to have been spelled "Selner" in adulthood. In the 1950s, he resided in Allentown at 1903 Turner Street. With his health in decline, John was admitted to live in the Phoebe Home, a senior living facility in Allentown. There, burdened with an enlarged heart, heart disease and hardening of the arteries at the age of 86, he died on Feb. 9, 1956. Rev. Sydney Smith, superintendent of the Phoebe Home, signed the death certificate, spelling the deceased's last name as "Selner" and the names of John's parents as "Charles Zoellner" and "Catharine Ann Youngken." There was no viewing. Burial was in Pleasant Hill Cemetery in Bucks County, with an obituary appearing in the Allentown Morning Call.  

  • Grandson Henry Herman Youngken (1831-1924) was born on July 30, 1831 in Nockamixon Township. After receiving a grade-school education, he learned the trade of cabinet-making and worked in this field as a  young man in Bethlehem and Easton, PA. On April 12, 1857, he married Anna Christianna Lenning (Sept. 1834- ? ), daughter of Adam and Christiana Lenning of Easton, OA. The nuptials were held in St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church in Easton, PA, by Rev. Stadtler, and announced in the Bucks County Intelligencer. Five children of this union were Sarah Youngken, Mary Alice Carlow, John N. Youngken, Abraham Lenning Youngken and Emma Jane Faben. Henry also was a longtime farmer and flour miller. When the federal census enumeration was made in 1880, his aged mother and brother Nicholas were in the household, as was a 37-year-old grandson, David Mensch. He and his brother rebuilt the old family flour mill. In 1889, Henry and his brother Nicholas among others signed a petition to establish Bridgeton Township from its parent Nockamixon Township in Bucks County, as cited in the 1905 book History of Bucks County, Volume 2, by William W.H. Davis. As of 1894, he is believed to have operated Chapmans Quarries Hotel in Northampton County.

    Younkin Family News Bulletin, 1938  
    Henry also is credited with having served on the Committee on Arrangements for and event of the Buckwampun Literary Association to help celebrated the Bucksville Centennial. Others on this committee were John T. Buck, Harvey Kiser, Sylvester Buck, Owen George, and Abel Kohl, all residents in or near Bucksville, and the descendants of old and respected families," wrote William J. Buck in his 1893 book Account of the Buck Family of Bucks County, Pennsylvania. "Much credit is to be given to the various ways they faithfully labored in making the occasion a grand success." In 1907, at the death of his sister Julia, Henry was named in the Allentown Morning Call obituary. His final residence was in Nockamixon. Just a few months prior to Henry's death, in October 1924, Rev. O.N. Melchor paid a call to the home and "saw their marriage license dated April 12, 1851," reported the Morning Call. "Mr. Youngkin is 93 and Mrs. Youngkin is 91 and both are able to be about but very hard of hearing. Mr. Youngkin is blind in one eye and Mrs. Youngkin almost entirely blind."  Henry Herman endured a stroke and surrendered to the angel of death on Dec. 28, 1924. Burial was in Durham. Grandson David N. Mensch, of Bucksville, PA, was the informant for the death certificate. A granddaughter, Gladys D. Youngkin, published a letter in the April 30, 1938 edition of the  Younkin Family News Bulletin article saying the old farm was the original homestead and in the family until sold in 1925. 

    Great-granddaughter Sarah Youngken

    Great-granddaughter Mary "Alice" Youngken wed Robert Carlow of Philadelphia. One known son was David M. Carlow.

    Great-grandson John Nicholas Youngken IV ( ? - ? ) may be the same "John N. Youngken, son of Henry Youngken, Nockamixon," who in September 1894 was injured in a hunting accident. Said the Perkasie News Herald, he and Harry Kane of Bucksville "went into the woods to gun for squirrels. After chasing one into a hole in a tree, both men stood their guns against the tree and discussed ways and means of capturing the game. Youngken was leaning against the tree with his left hand, and they came to the conclusion the squirrel could not be caught. Kane picked up his gun, and in dong so struck the hammer against the tree, discharging the piece and sending the whole load through Youngken's arm above the wrist. The unfortunate man was taken to his father's house, where Dr. G.M. Grim, of Ottsville, bandaged the wound and ordered him to be sent to St. Luke's Hospital, Bethlehem. He was taken to that institution and Saturday afternoon his arm was amputated at the elbow." John married Lillie T. McCarty ( ? - ? ).

    Great-grandson Abraham Lenning Youngken entered into marriage with Eva Emaline Overholtzer (Nov. 26, 1873- ? ). The couple lived in Easton and at one point moved to Philadelphia. Two known offspring were Harold Henry Nicholas Youngken and Gladys Dorothy Youngken. They are named in the book Some account of Jacob Oberholtzer, who settled, about 1719, in Franconia township, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania.

    Great-granddaughter Emma Jane Youngken ( ? - ? ) married West Faben. They planted themselves in Bucksville, Bucks County and bore one daughter, Edith May Faben.

  • Grandson Abraham Youngken (1833-1857) was born on March 28, 1833 in Bucks County. In 1855, he entered into marriage with Mary Catherine Frankenfield (1832-1917), daughter of Henry and Anna (Datesman) Frankenfield. Sadly, their marriage was brief and produced one son, Abraham Frankenfield Youngken. When he was 24 years of age, he died in Bucks County on Nov. 13, 1856 or 1857. Burial took place in St. Luke's Evangelical Lutheran Church Cemetery in Ferndale, Bucks County. Mary Catherine married a second time, on Sept. 23, 1860, to Aaron Ziegenfuss (1830-1902). The Ziegenfusses bore five more offspring of their own -- Ellamanda Ziegenfuss, Anna Ziegenfuss, Mahlon Ziegenfuss, Henry Ziegenfuss and Harvey Ziegenfuss. She endured as a two-time widow and passed away at the age of 85 on Nov. 15, 1917. Burial was in Durham Cemetery in Bucks County. Mary and Abraham are mentioned in a section about the Frankenfield family in the 1905 book A Genealogical and Personal History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, Vol. III, authored by William W.H. Davis.

      
    Abraham F. Youngken's 1858 baptismal certificate in German. In English: "The married man Abraham Youngken and his wife Maria Catharina a born Frankenfield has a son been born on the 31st day of March in the year of our Lord 1858. This son was born in Haycock Township in Bucks County in the State of Pennsylvania in North America, he was christianed and received the name Abraham on the 20th day of June in the year of our Lord 1858 from Mr. W.B. Kemmerer. Christianing witnesses: the mother of the child." Courtesy Edna (Youngkin) Swartz and Donna (Younkin) Logan

    Great-grandson Abraham Frankenfield Youngken (1858-1934) -- also spelled "Younghen" -- was born on March 31, 1858 in Haycock Township, Bucks County. In June of that year, he was baptized by Rev. W.B. Kemmerer, with the parents receiving the traditional "taufschein," a certificate of baptism, written in German. Abraham was twice-wed. His first bride, on Nov. 2, 1878, was Mary Ellen Steeley (1857-1885). The wedding was announced in the Bucks County Intelligencer. Their trio of children were Mary Estella Youngkin, Oscar William Youngken and Christian Steely Youngkin. The eldest two children both died in September 1881, five days apart, with their tender remains lowered into repose in St. Luke's Evangelical Lutheran and Reformed Church Cemetery in Nockamixon. Sadly, Mary Ellen died in 1885 at the age of only 20. Abraham's second spouse, whom he married on June 12, 1886, was Ellemanda Bougher (1865-1928). They bore two children of their own -- Horace Youngken and Alvin F. Youngkin. The Youngkens were longtime farmers. Their residence was located along Hellertown Road in Lower Saucon Township, Northampton County, PA. Burdened with senility, Abraham died at the age of 75, on Feb. 18, 1934. Son Christian, of Bethehem, PA, provided details for the official Pennsylvania certificate of death. His remains sleep for the ages in Nockamixon Union Cemetery in Ferndale.

    Great-great-grandson Christian Steely Youngkin (1883-1969) was born on May 25, 1883. On Christmas Eve 1904, at the home of the bride, he wed Minnie Georgia Serfass (1881-1972). Presiding was Rev. Sandt of the Lutheran Church of Freemansburg. They later told a newspaper reported that "For their wedding trip ... they traveled by horse drawn sleigh to the home of Mr. Youngken's father, Abraham Youngken, in Bucks Co. The couple recalled that it was so cold that the clocks stopped running and they were snowbound for several days." Christian earned a living over the years as a farmer and milkman, employed by Norbeth Dairy, with a residence along Hawthorne Road in Bethlehem, PA, and a membership in the Betheny United Church of Christ. He retired in 1950. Their address circa 1960 was 732 Hawthorne Road. At their 56th wedding anniversary, they were pictured in the local newspaper.He died at the age of 85, in Northampton County, on April 11, 1969. Burial was in Belfast Union Cemetery in the county. five known children were Georgia Herrity, Mary Marguerite Younken, Alvin W.S. Youngkin, Philip F. Youngken and Henry C. Youngken.

    Alvin and Alice Youngkin 
    Great-great-grandson Horace Youngkin (1887-1972) was born on April 12, 1887. He entered into marriage with Anna E. Bean (1887-1942). The pair's three known children were Evelyn Pearl Youngken, Anna Kathryn Youngkin and Walter Bean Youngkin. Sadness cascaded over the family when Anna passed away in 1942. Death carried him away at the age of 84 on March 13, 1972. The remains sleep for all time in Nickamixon Union Cemetery.

    Great-great-grandson Alvin F. Youngkin (1893-1963) was born on April 11, 1893. He was joined in wedlock with Alice Grace Weirbach (1894-1947). Alvin labored as a farmer and was employed by Bethlehem Fabricators. Together, they bore a family of four known individuals -- Clarence Edward Youngkin, Harold Abraham Youngkin, Ralph Louis Youngkin and Edna Swartz. Alice passed away in 1947 at the age of about 51. The angel of death cleaved him away on Sept. 20, 1963. The remains were lowered into the soil of Durham Cemetery in Bucks County.

  • Grandson Herman Younkin (1834- ? ) was born in 1834. Nothing more is known.
  • Grandson Jesse Younkin ( ? - ? ) was born in (?). He is said to have gone west. He was still living as of 1899.
  • Grandson Michael Youngkin ( ? - ? ) lived in Nockamixon in 1907 and was named in the Allentown newspaper obituary of his sister Julia Kohl. 

Son John Michael Junghen/Youngken (1773- ? ) was deceased by 1850.

Son Abraham Junghen/Youngkin (1775-1849) was born on Oct. 6, 1775 in Springfield Township, Bucks County. He entered into marriage with Elizabeth Hauser ( ? - ? ), daughter of Ulrich Hauser. Their only known offspring was Jemima Youngkin. In September and October 1814, he and his brother Nicholas are believed to have served in Captain Wilson's Bucks County Company at Marcus Hook for the defence of Philadelphia during the War of 1812. Abraham died at the age of 73, in Smithfield Township, Monroe County, PA. As named in Abraham's last will and testament, Abraham Newhart served as executor of the estate. The final account was announced in the Aug. 21, 1851 edition of The Jeffersonian of Stroudsburg.

  • Granddaughter Jemima Youngkin ( ? - ? ) was born on (?). She married (?) Newhard. One known child was Abraham Newhard. 

Daughter Anna Catharina Junghen/Youngken (1778- ? ) was born in 1778. She was twice-wed. One of her spouses is said to have been John Leonard. Another reputedly was Conrad Dutro.

Son John Junghen/Youngken (1789- ? ) was born in about 1789. He earned a living as a blacksmith.

John David's grave, 1849
Courtesy Tom Myers
Daughter Mary Magdalena Junghen/Youngken (1781-1873) was born on Oct. 25, 1781 or 1788 in Bucks County. She was joined in the rite of wedlock with John "David" Seip (March 11, 1773-1849), son of Johan Jacob and Rosina (Mertz) Seipt. Seven children resulted from this marriage -- William Seip, Anna Margaret Seip, Rosanna Wright, David Seip, Catharine Steely, Maria Maxwwell and Elizabeth Oldham. John David died at the age of 76 on Oct. 12, 1849. Mary Magdalena outlived him by 24 years. Death spirited her away at the age of 91 on July 28, 1873. Interment was in St. Luke's Evangelical Lutheran Church Cemetery in Ferndale, Bucks County. Her death was noted on the pages of the Pittsburgh Commercial, which said that her death "occurred at her residence in Nickamixon... at the advanced age of ninety-three, [and she] was the eldest person living in that neighborhood. She left thirty-eight grandchildren, forty great-grandchildren and one great-great grandchild." While David's grave is marked, Mary Magdalena's apparently is not. Information on this clan was provided to the late Donna (Younkin) Logan by Shirley Hadley of Englewood, CO.

  • Grandson William Seip ( ? - ? ) was born on (?). He wed Anna Maria Raub ( ? - ? ). His occupation over the years was as a tinsmith. Evidence suggests that he may have died in Reigelsville, Bucks County on May 7, 1882, at the age of 81, with burial in Durham Cemetery, and an obituary appearing in the Philadelphia Inquirer. This needs to be confirmed.
  • Granddaughter Anna Margaret Seip (1805- ? ) was born on March 1, 1805. At her infant baptism, her sponsors were her uncle and aunt, Anthony and Margaret (Youngken) Hoffman.
  • Granddaughter Rosanna Seip ( ? - ? ) was born on (?). She was united in matrimony with George P. Wright ( ? - ? ).
  • Grandson David Seip (1816-1885) was born on Aug. 7, 1816. He married Catharine (1819-1858). Their known offspring were Mary Ellen Seip, Theodore F. Seip, John Henry Seip, Sarah Seip and  Emma Nicholas. Sadly, Catharine died in 1858. David survived his bride by 27 years and wed a second time to Lucy Ann ( ? - ? ). At the age of 69, he passed away on Aug. 16, 1885. His remains are in eternal repose in St. Luke's Evangelical Lutheran Church Cemetery in Ferndale, Bucks County.

    Great-granddaughter Mary Ellen Seip ( ? - ? )

    Great-grandson Theodore F. Seip ( ? - ? ) 

    Great-grandson John Henry Seip (1851- ? ) was born in 1851. He was united in matrimony with Catharine Matilda (McElroy) Slifer (1851-1915). A stone stands in his name in Upper Tinicum Cemetery in Bucks County, but without a year of death. Catharine died at the age of 64 on Sept. 5, 1915.

    Great-granddaughter Sarah Seip ( ? - ? ) 

    Great-granddaughter Emma Seip (1859-1906) was born in 1859 or 1861. Circa 1880, she tied the knot with Elias Nicholas (June 1851-1915). They made their residence in Durham, Bucks County and produced two offspring -- Jenny Nicholas and Raymond Nicholas. Elias earned a living as a miner of iron ore. Stricken with what a physician called "congestion of the brain," at the age of 45, she died in the state hospital in Norristown, PA on May 2, 1906. Dr. Mary M. Wolfe signed the death certificate. Burial was in Durham Cemetery. 

  • Granddaughter Catharine Seip (1819- ? ) was born on March 7, 1819. She was joined in wedlock with Frederick Steely ( ? - ? ).
  • Granddaughter Maria Seip ( ? - ? ) tied the knot with William Maxwell ( ? - ? ).
  • Granddaughter Elizabeth Seip ( ? - ? ) married William Oldham ( ? - ? ).

Daughter Elisabeth Junghen (1807-1840)  was born in 1807. The angel of death carried her away at the age of about 33 in 1840. Her estate is recorded in Bucks County Estate Book 3, page 220.

Daughter Margaret Youngkin ( ? - ? ) was born on (?). She wed Anthony Hoffman/Huffman ( ? - ? ). Their duo of daughters were Mary Hoffman and Elisabeth Hoffman. At the infant baptism of their niece Anna Margaret Seipt circa 1805, Margaret and Anthony served as sponsors. Sadly, Margaret was deceased prior to December 1829.

  • Granddaughter Mary Hoffman ( ? - ? ) 
  • Granddaughter Elisabeth Hoffman ( ? - ? )

David Youngken's grave, 1884
Courtesy Tom Myers
Son David Youngken (1804-1884) was born on April 4, 1804. He was baptized in infancy by Rev. Mensch, with Jacob and Susanna Funk serving as his godparents. The pastor gave the parents baptismal certificate written in German. David entered into the rite of marriage with Matilda Green (Sept. 8, 1809-1871). Together, they produced one known son, Josiah G. Youngkin. Matilda passed away at the age of 62 on Nov. 30, 1871. David lived on for another nearly 13 years. He was gathered in by the grim reaper of death at the age of 80 on Aug. 8, 1884. The remains were laid to rest in Richlandtown Union Cemetery in Bucks County. In its "Richlandtown" column, the Perkasie (PA) News Herald reported that he had been the "owner of the well known nursery and fruit farm lying on the limits of the town..." A report about this branch was written by Gustavus N. Hart of Haddonfield, NJ and published in the Younkin Family News Bulletin edition of Christmas 1937. Their grave markers stood erect and legible when photographed by Tom Myers, who posted them on the Find a Grave website and graciously has allowed his images to be used in this biography.   

  • Grandson Josiah G. Youngkin (1827-1907) was born on Feb. 6, 1827 in Richland Township, Bucks County. He completed two years of study at the Quakertown School and then became a teacher himself, spending a dozen years as an educator. In 1853, at the age of 26, he married Maria Helen Minnich (1831-1897), daughter of Joseph and Sarah Minnich of Allentown. Their nine known offspring were Oswin A. Youngkin, Charles Eugene Youngken, Milton A. Youngken, Alice H. Youngken, Ida Stull, Elizabeth Jane Younken, Titus C. Youngken, David J. Youngken and John Ferdinand Youngken. Five years into the marriage, Josiah is known to have acquired his fatheer's farm at Richlandtown, where he "engaged in fruit growing, and his botanical garden is filled with the choicest of flowers," said a profile in the 1887 History of Bucks County, edited by J.H. Battle. In May 1885, the Perkasie News Herald reported that he was "building an addition to his house. He has torn down part of the old one." They are known to have held a dance at their residence in July 1893. In July 1897, the couple hosted a visit from Titus C. Youngken of Philadelphia. By 1899, the Youngkins lived in Springfield, Bucks County. He later showed his father's German-language baptismal certificate to a friend, Gustavus N. Hart of Haddonfield, NJ, and told him stories about the early days of the Revolutionary War era. Sadness blanketed the family when Maria Helen passed away on Dec. 16 or 22, 1897.

    The widowed Josiah spent his final years in Richland Township, Bucks County. He made news in the Philadelphia Times in July 1899 when laying claim to several millions of dollars worth of property in Luzerne County, which he said had belonged to his grandfather John. The article said that Josiah "lives in a frame mansion, near Applebachville, on the road leading from Richlandtown to the Bethlehem road, in Bucks county." It added that he "has in his possession an old Bible which belonged to his father, David, and gives the date and place of birth, and also the marriage certificate of his great-grandfather, John Youngken." Around that time, he leased his farm to Dr. A.G. Langler of Easton for purposes of mining ore. Having been afflicted with hardening of the arteries and a ruptured aorta, he died at the old homestead on Jan. 25, 1907, just 19 days shy of his 80th birthday. Interment was in Springfield Cemetery. Milton Youngken of Richland Township signed the death certificate. Burial was in Pleasant Hill Cemetery. An obituary in the North Penn Reporter spelled his name "Chessiah" but a similar one in the Perkasie News Herald spelled it correctly. Both versions said that "In his younger days he taught school and was also a school director at one time in Richland township." The News Herald added that he "was a respected and life-long resident near Richlandtown."

    Profile in the 1887 History of Bucks County, edited by J.H. Battle
    Courtesy Google Books

    Great-grandson Oswin A. Youngkin (1855-1901)

    Great-grandson Milton A. Youngken (1859-1925) dwelled in Richlandtown in 1907.

    Great-granddaughter Ida Youngken (1862-1934) married Benjamin Stull. 

    Great-grandson David J. Youngken (1867-1928) was born in 1867. His homeplace in 1907 was near Richlandtown. The 1992 obituary of his great-grandson David E. Youngken, killed in an automobile accident in North Carolina, was published in the Younkin Family News Bulletin (January-March 1993). 

    Great-grandson John Ferdinand Youngken (1873-1956) resided near Richlandtown, PA in 1907. 

    Heber Youngken Jr., with a portrait of his father.
    Courtesy Younkin Family News Bulletin, January-March 1993

    Great-grandson Charles Eugene Youngken ( ? - ? ) lived in Quakertown, PA in 1900-1907. On Sept. 11, 1884, he was joined in wedlock with Marian W. Wilkinson ( ? - ? ) of Philadelphia. The wedding was held in the Grace Baptist Church, Philadelphia, by the hand of Rev. Russell H. Conwell, and announced in the Bucks County Intelligencer. They became the parents of Dr. Heber Wilkinson Youngken, Eugene Wingrove Youngken and Dell Wallace Youngken. Son Heber was a professor at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and the author of A Textbook of Pharmacognosywhich went into more than 60 printings.

    Great-grandson Titus Youngken ( ? - ? ) was in Philadelphia in 1897-1900. 

~ Son Abraham Junghen Sr. ~

Son Abraham Junghen Sr. (1745-1790) was born on Oct. 2, 1745 in Tinicum Township, Bucks County, PA

He wed Elizabeth Wyker ( ? - ? ).

Together, they bore a trio of known offspring, Nicolaus Junghen, Abraham Younkin Jr. and Mary Junghen.

Abraham is said to have died in 1790. If so, his wife was expecting a baby at that time, as their son Abraham was not born until March 1791. 

Son Nicolaus Junghen (1788- ? ) was born on Aug. 25, 1788 in Tinicum Township, Bucks County. Nothing more about his life is known. 

Daughter Mary Junghen/Youngkin ( ? - ? ) was united in marriage with Isaac Overholt ( ? - ? ).

~ Son Daniel Junghen ~

Son Daniel Junghen ( ? - ? ) was born on (?). 

Daniel was still a bachelor when named in his father's last will.

During the American Revolutionary War, in the 1775-1881 timeframe, he served in the Bucks County Militia. This service is referenced in the Pennsylvania Archives Series 5, Volume 5. 

~ Son George Junghen/Younken ~

Son George Junghen ( ? - ? ) was born on (?). 

During the American Revolutionary War, in the 1775-1881 timeframe, he served in the Bucks County Militia. This service is referenced in the Pennsylvania Archives, Series 5, Volume 5. 

He was joined in wedlock with Elizabeth Bollinger (1769-1852). 

The couple moved to Northumberland County, PA, where in 1811 they dwelled near Pottsgrove in Chillisquaque Township. Their name generally was spelled "Younken" and "Younkin" in public documents.

Their house and barn and their contents were consumed in a fire in September 1833 and reported on the pages of the United States Gazette and the Lewisburg Journal. George's name appeared in a list of people having unclaimed mail at the Northumberland Post Office during the first week of the new year in 1835, published in the Sunbury Gazette.

George succumbed to the spectre of death in Chillisquaque Township, sometime prior to 1850.

When the federal census enumeration was made in 1850, the widowed Elizabeth dwelled by herself in Chillisquaque. Census records of 1850 show no one else by that surname in the county.

She is believed to have passed away on Dec. 20, 1852. The Sunbury American reported in its "DIED" column Jan. 8, 1853 edition that "In Chilisquaque, on the 20th ult., Mrs. YOUNKEN, wife of George Younken, deceased, aged 76 years."

George and Elizabeth are named in the Christmas 1937 edition of the Younkin Family News Bulletin

~ Son Herman Junghen/Younkin Jr. ~

Son Herman Junghen/Younkin Jr. (1748- ? ) was born on Feb. 5, 1748, a twin with his sister Magdalena.

He was a bachelor as of 1782 when listed among taxable men in Tinicum Township. 

Nothing more is known.

~ Daughter Magdalena Junghen ~

Daughter Magdalena Junghen (1748- ? ) was born on Feb. 5, 1748, a twin with her brother Herman.

~ Daughter Maria Catharina (Younken) Haupt/Houpt ~

 
The Haupts' graves, Durham Lutheran Cemetery  - Courtesy Tom Myers

Daughter Maria Catharine Youngken (1749-1815) was born in 1749, also spelled "Younken" and "Junkin."

At the age of 17, circa 1766, she was joined in wedlock with John "Henry" Sebastian Haupt Jr. (May or July 21, 1744-1809), son of John Henry "Sebastian" and Catharine Haupt Sr. The family surname alternately has been spelled "Houpt" over the years.

Henry's father, Sebastian, is believed to have originated in the Palatinate region of Germany and came to America at age 23 aboard the ship Glasgow, which arrived in the Port of Philadelphia on Sept. 11, 1738. He eventually settled in Perkiomen, Montgomery County, PA.

Rev. W.H. Haupt's manuscript history of the Haupts
Courtesy Somerset (PA) Historical Center

The family of a dozen children they produced together included John Haupt, Mary Magdalena Kreider, Sebastian Haupt, Samuel Haupt, Jacob Haupt, Sarah Pietsch, Sebastian Haupt II, Maria Elizabeth Haupt, Abraham Haupt, Catherine Evans, Henry Haupt and Elisabeth Baker.

The Haupts' home in the early 1800s was in Durham Township, Bucks County. When the township was legally formed in 1775, Henry's name appeared a petition supporting the move. He is said to have operated grist mills on a cousin's tract in Upper Dublin, PA. In 1770, he spent £1,200 to acquire a mill property from his father-in-law in Springfield Township, near Durham. As of 1931, descendants remained in possession of that tract of land.

Then in 1771, Henry purchased an 80-acre tract from his father, at a price of £150, and appears to have rented it to tenant farmers. He held on to this tract for three years until selling it again for £515, quite a marked appreciation. When lots in the Durham property were made available for sale, he bought two along Cook's Creek, of nearly 500 acres, adjacent to his earlier purchase. They erected a house and raised their family on the acreage. Records of family births, deaths and marriages were kept in a large German Bible.

During the American Revolutionary War, Henry went to Durham to sign an Oath of Allegiance to the new nation on May 27, 1778. He is believed to have served in a Pennsylvania militia unit, circa 1781, Capt. George Heinlein's Company of Durham. 

Wrote a great-granddaughter in 1931, "He had a busy life, buying and selling much property, running mills, farm, distillery and forge, and his six sons were kept so strictly and severely at work, that each of them, as he came of age, went out of the homestead to work for himself... [to] escape from parental control. It is commonly said that the Bucks County Haupts went north, south, east and west." 

Henry passed away at the age of 64 on New Year's Day 1809. Interment was in a private burial grounds near their home.

Maria Catharine survived him by six years. The angel of death cleaved her away in Springfield Township on Jan. 30, 1815, at the age of 66. 

Durham Furnace area near the Houpts' homeplace

Their and their offspring's early burials were in the private grounds. Then after the Durham Lutheran Church was incorporated, on Sept. 15, 1862, the coffins were removed and reburied near other loved ones at Durham, and new stones erected in their memory.

Their genealogy was chronicled in 1931 by a great-granddaughter, Anita (Smith) Eyster. She shared her materials for publication in the Younkin Family News Bulletin of the 1930s and her materials later were deposited in the Spruance Library at the Mercer Museum in Doylestown, in affiliation with the Bucks County Historical Society. Other records were typed under the title "Haupt family in America" by Rev. William H. Haupt of St. Andrew's Rectory in Charition, Iowa, with a copy deposited at the Somerset County (PA) Historical Society. The Colonial Haupt Association at some point published a book, entitled Descendants of Sebastian Haupt who arrived at Philadelphia September 9, 1738.

Son John Haupt (1767-1851) was born on Feb. 20 or June 12, 1767. He was baptized in infancy in St. Luke's Lutheran and Reformed Church near Ferndale, Bucks County, with John Juncken and Barbara Dieter serving as his sponsors. He tied the marital knot in 1792 with his mother's first cousin, Anna "Elizabeth" Younken II (Sept. 3, 1770-1831), daughter of Johann Heinrich and Catharina (Scherer) Junghen. John left home to seek his own fortune but was the only one of his siblings to return and settle on the family homestead and "carry on the line in Bucks County," wrote Anita (Smith) Eyster. "We have some direct evidence here, unfortunately only fragmenetary. In the papers of John HOUPT, 2nd, at the Homestead, only a few years ago, there was found a single sheet of paper, which was the firt page of a life history, begun by this first John HOUPT, oldest son of Henry. Short as it is, it gives us a glimpse of this family that is invaluable:

I, John Houpt, was born near Philadelphia on the 12th day of June, 1767. My parents were Henry and Catherine Houpt. My grandparents emigrated from Germany, which country they left in consequence of the persecution of protestants, preferring the wilderness of America, with the freedom from persecution, to the cultivated fields of Europe in connection with the oppression. They were by profession Lutherans, or Episcopalians, as the believers of the same doctrine are called in England. My parents brought me up in strict obedience to the church discipline and creed of the religious society of which they were members; and to that creed I have adhered during life; but I think with more liberality towards those who are of a different opinion than was manifested by my parents. For as I have looked back and reflected on their pertinacious adherence to forms and ceremonies, I have concluded that they were somewhat superstitious in being so very strenuous in their way and that they were not sufficiently charitable towards others.

Being the oldest of my father's sons, of which there were ten sons and daughters, I was, after the manner of the Germans, kept closely to work by my father at his business, he being a farmer, and therefore got but very little learning, though I so far improved my limited opportunities within my reach, as to be able to read the German language, though I never went to German school. When I arrived at the age of twenty-one years, I resolved to see a little of the world, and though my parents were opposed to my determination, yet having resolved I was not to be turned from my purpose. When the day arrived when I had fixed for leaving my home, my father, who was just ready to go to church, put a small amount ofmoney, less than...

At marriage, John and Elizabeth made a home in the end rooms of their mill. By 1796, he acquired from his father the original 90-acre family farm, including the mills, for the price of £2,000. He kept an account book that first year, a manuscript preserved in the Bucks County Historical Society. In all, John bought nearly 50 tracts of land, with the deeds later kept by a grandson, William F. Witte. On this ground, circa 1798, they erected a large stone house. They produced a family of 10 children, including four sons and six daughters, of whom only one of the sons married. Among the known names were Henry Youngken Haupt, John Haupt Jr., Daniel Haupt, Abraham Haupt, Catherine Riegel, Elizabeth Haupt, Sarah Frey, Benjamin "Franklin" Haupt, Mary Haupt and Mary Ann Witte.

Catherine surrendered to the angel of death on March 1, 1831. John outlived her by two decades. He died near Philadelphia on Aug. 25, 1851, at the age of 84 years, two months and 13 days. His remains were placed in the family's private burial ground and then in 1862 relocated to Durham Lutheran Church Cemetery.. Wrote Anita Eyster in 1931, "John HOUPT so far profited by his early hardships that he gave to his children all the advantages of education that might be had in his day. It is notable that the family has produced few farmers but many engineers and professional men. And the Lutheran creed is still held amongst them, with its harshness modified by time." 

  • Grandson Henry Youngken Haupt (1793-1864) was born on Aug. 2, 1793. He did not marry. Death claimed his life on July 26, 1864, at the age of 70 years, 11 months and 24 days. His remains sleep for the ages in Durham Lutheran Church Cemetery.
  • Grandson John Haupt Jr. (1795-1885) was born on July 25, 1795. He was a lifelong bachelor. At the age of 90 years, three months and six days, John died on Oct. 31, 1885. Burial was in the cemetery of the Durham Lutheran Church.
  • Grandson Daniel Haupt (1798-1802) was born in 1798. He only lived to the age of four and died in 1802. Burial was in Durham Lutheran Church Cemetery. 
  • Grandson Abraham Haupt (1799-1871) was born on Sept. 11, 1799. In Oct. 1829, he wed Rachel Long (Sept. 1, 1799-1852), daughter of Judge William and Jane Long. They bore five offspring -- Elizabeth Hibler, Jane Stuckert, William L. Haupt, Sarah Haupt and Mary E. Haupt. During the Civil War, they grieved at the loss of their son at the Battle of Falmouth, VA. Sadly, Rachel died on April 1, 1852, at the age of 52 years and seven months. She sleeps in eternal repose in Durham Lutheran Church Cemetery. Abraham outlived his wife by nearly two decades. He succumbed to the spectre of death on Aug. 15, 1871. The body was lowered under the sod of Durham Cemetery.

    Great-granddaughter Elizabeth Haupt (1821-1848) was born on Sept. 11, 1821. On Aug. 14, 1840, when she was 18 years of age, she married Stuart Hibler ( ? - ? ). Sadly, she died on Feb. 3, 1848, at the age of 26.

    Great-granddaughter Jane Haupt (1827-1898) was born on Oct. 28, 1827. When she was 24 years old, on Oct. 4, 1852, she wed Allentown resident George W. Stuckert (1828-1896). Death enveloped her on Sept. 29, 1898.

    Great-grandson William L. Haupt (1832-1863) was born on Jan. 9, or Aug. 2, 1832. Circa 1855, he was joined in matrimony with Matilda W. "Tillie" Martin ( ? - ? ). He joined the Union Army during the Civil War and was assigned to the 115th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I or F. He took part in the Battle of Falmouth on Jan. 26, 1863, and died of typhoid fever in a military hospital at Falmough. It is possible that the body was transported back to Bucks County to sleep with his forbears in the Durham Lutheran Church Cemetery, as a marker stands at his grave. The widowed Matilda immediately filed for and was awarded a military pension as compensation for her loss. [Widow App. #13.319 - Cert. #3.979] Her name adorns the family grave marker, but no dates are inscribed.

    Great-granddaughter Sarah V. Haupt (1834- ? ) was born in July 1834. She died at age 13 years and six months on Jan. 15, 1848.

    Great-granddaughter Mary E. Haupt ( ? -1848) was born on May 10, (?). She passed away in 1848 at the age of 10 years, eight months and six days. 

  • Granddaughter Catherine Haupt (1801-1881) was born on Jan. 27, 1801. On her 18th birthday, she entered into marriage with David Riegal (Sept. 1, 1794-1865). Together, the pair produced a family of four -- Franklin Riegel, Sophia Riegel, Reuben Reigel and Elizabeth Weidner. They were plunged into grief when son Franklin died in infancy in 1821. David died on June 27, 1865, two months after the close of the Civil War. Catherine survived for another 16 years. She passed into the arms of the angels on Nov. 21, 1881.

    Great-granddaughter Sophia Riegel (1823-1830) died at the age of seven.

    Great-grandson Reuben Riegel (1824-1846) was born on Sept. 3, 1824. He passed away just a dozen days after his 22nd birthday on Sept. 15, 1846.

    Great-granddaughter Elizabeth Josephine Riegel (1829- ? ) was born in 1829. She wed Thomas B. Weidner ( ? - ? ). 

  • Granddaughter Elizabeth Haupt (1804-1881) was born on Dec. 10, 1804. She too did not marry. The spirit of death cleaved her away on Sept. 6, 1881. In his Haupt genealogy manuscript, Rev. William H. Haupt of Charition, IA had no data other than her name.
  • Granddaughter Sarah Haupt (1807-1863) was born on Feb. 12 or 14, 1807. She wed James Frey ( ? - ? ) of Allentown, PA. She died on St. Patrick's Day 1863, at the age of 56 years, one month and 14 days. Burial was in the Durham Union Cemetery. Many years later, in 1921, Dr. B.F. Fackenthal Jr. of Riegelsville recorded the inscriptions on the graves and retyped them for a written record.
  • Grandson Benjamin "Franklin" Haupt (1809-1838) was born on Feb. 12, 1809 or on Aug. 30, 1809. At the age of 29, he passed away on Sept. 4, 1838. His remains sleep in the sacred soil of Durham Lutheran Church Cemetery.
  • Granddaughter Mary Haupt ( ? -1814) was born in about 1812 or 1813. She died at the age of one in 1814. Interment was in Durham Lutheran Church Cemetery.
  • Granddaughter Mary Ann Haupt (1816-1876) was born on Dec. 8, 1816. On June 18, 1840, at the age of 23, she was joined in wedlock with William H. Witte (Oct. 4, 1817-1875). They were the parents of a brood of three children -- Emma Elizabeth Smith, William Franklin Witte and Mary Ellen Haupt. Wife and husband died about a year apart. He passed first, in 1875. She died on March 5, 1876. In 1931, their son William owned and occupied the old Haupt farm and stone house. 

    Anita Eyster belonged to this family organization in Philadelphia 

    Great-granddaughter Emma Elizabeth Witte (1841- ? ) was born on May 22, 1841. She entered into marriage with Alfred Eugene Smith (Jan. 11, 1836-1905). Their three children were Anita Ludlum Eyster, Elizabeth Haupt Smith and Margaret Regina Smith. They grieved at the death of daughter Margaret in 1901 at the age of about 29. Alfred died on Jan. 4, 1905. In the 1930s, their daughter Anita was active in genealogy and was historian with the Colonial Haupt Association and a member of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. Her writings on the Youngken and Haupt families are essential for the understanding of these early Pennsylvania German families. Her home in 1931 was on South 42nd Street in Philadelphia.

    Great-grandson William Franklin Witte (1844- ? ) was born on April 25, 1844. On Nov. 7, 1871, he tied the marital knot with Annie J. Everett ( ? - ? ).

    Great-granddaughter Mary Ellen Witte (1849-1921) was born on May 20, 1849. She was united in matrimony with a cousin, Henry E. Haupt ( ? - ? ), son of Lewis L. Haupt. 

Daughter Mary Magdalena Haupt (1769-1816) was born on Sept. 9, 1768 or July 16, 1769. On Sept. 29, 1789, she tied the knot with Abraham Kreider (March 13, 1766-1826). The pair established their dwelling-place in Central Pennsylvania. Their foursome of offspring were Mary Catherine Barton, Regina Worman, John Kreider and Henry Kreider. Mary Magdalena reputedly died on Nov. 17, 1816. Abraham outlived her by a decade. He passed away on Nov. 2, 1826.

  • Granddaughter Mary Catherine Kreider (1790-1882) was born on Aug. 3, 1790. When she was 25 years of age, on Feb. 15, 1816, she was united in matrimony with John Barton (May 10, 1785-1856). The Bartons bore eight children -- Anna Regina Dreke, Emeline Paxton, Caroline M. Payne, Elisha K.P. Barton, Mary Catherine Barton, Adaline Townsend, John Hewey Barton and Clara E. Parker. John died on May 23, 1856. Mary Catherine lived on for another nearly 26 years. Death spirited her away on Jan. 29, 1882.

    Great-granddaughter Anna Regina Barton (1816- ? ) was born on Nov. 24, 1816. On March 13, 1845, she married Thomas W. Dreke ( ? - ? )

    Great-granddaughter Caroline M. Payne 

    Great-granddaughter Caroline M. Barton (1820-1852) was born on Nov. 5, 1820. She was joined in wedlock on Aug. 21, 1849 with Edward W. Payne ( ? - ? ). Sadly, she died at the age of 31 on May 6, 1852.

    Great-grandson Elisha K.P. Barton ( ? - ? ) died in his second year of age.

    Great-granddaughter Mary Catherine Barton (1824-1835) was born on Dec. 9, 1824. Sadly, she surrendered to the angel of death in 1835, at the age of about 10.

    Great-granddaughter Adaline Barton (1828- ? ) was born on Jan. 5, 1828. On June 2, 1859, she was united in matrimony with Joseph B. Townsend ( ? - ? ).

    Great-grandson John Hewey Barton (1830- ? ) was born on May 18, 1830. On June 15, 1860, he wed Hannah B. Price ( ? - ? ).

    Great-granddaughter Clara E. Barton (1832- ? ) was born on Sept. 10, 1832. When she was 31 years of age, on Jan. 14, 1864, she married Rev. C.C. Parker ( ? - ? ).

  • Granddaughter Regina Kreider (1792-1876) was born on Nov. 23, 1792. She tied the knot with (?) Worman ( ? - ? ). Four offspring in this family were Regina Snyder, Samuel Worman, Hannah Worman and Mary Creveling. Regina passed away in about 1876.

    Great-granddaughter Regina Worman married (?) Snyder of Bloomsburg, PA.

    Great-grandson Samuel Worman ( ? - ? )

    Great-granddaughter Mary Creveling 

    Great-granddaughter Mary Worman wed Alfred Creveling. They settled in Bloomsburg. 

  • Grandson John Kreider (1796- ? ) was born in 1796. He died young.
  • Grandson Henry Kreider (1798- ? ) was born in 1798. As with his brother John, he died at a young age.

Samuel's grave, Danube, NY, 1851
Courtesy Havergal Doherty

Son John Henry "Sebastian" Haupt III (1771-1775) was born on Aug. 4, 1771 in Springfield Township, Bucks County. Sadly, at the age of three-plus, he died in 1775. His tender remains were laid to rest in Durham Lutheran Church Cemetery.

Son Samuel Haupt (1773-1851) was born on Sept. 22, 1773 in Bucks County, PA. He entered into marriage with Elizabeth Sweitzer (Sept. 29, 1778- ? ), also of Bucks County. They migrated to New York State in youg adulthood and put down roots in Newville, Herkimer County. There Samuel constructed a gristmill on the site of the future home of their granddaughter Elizabeth Tibbitts. He also built a stone mill there in 1834 and in time added sawmills and other manufacturing-type facilities to the property. The family of children they produced together included Henry Houpt, Nancy Houpt I, Nancy Dyelin/Dysslin, Lewis Houpt, Chauncey Houpt, Eliza Church and Catherine Morris. Sadly, while his brother Jacob was visiting in September 1828, Jacob was afflicted and died in their home. Samuel lived for several decades more. As of 1850, U.S. Census records show him on a farm in Danube, Herkimer County, NY, with 34-year-old daughter Eliza in the household along with 18-year-old Sarah C. Dyslin. A family burying ground is believed to have been carved out of their farm tract at some point, known as "Houpt Cemetery." He died in New York on Jan. 9, 1851, and his remains were laid to rest in the Houpt Cemetery in Danube. His name and dates were inscribed on the face of his grave marker. More on this family possibly could be found in the "Kratz Family History" referenced by William H. Haupt of Charition, Iowa in his manuscript genealogy records. 

Houpt Cemetery sits on a hill behind a private residence near the intersection of Newville Road and Fords Bush Road in the Village of Newville, Town of Danube. This home is said to have belonged to the Houpt family at one time. Access is gained through an entrance opposite Creek Road, but a visitor needs to park and then walk up along a mowed path. The town of Danube maintains this cemetery. Of the 132 known burials registered on Find-a-Grave, 14 bear the name Houpt, with many more family interments with some other surname.

Above: Site of Henry Houpt's farm directly south of Newville,  Danube Township, from the 1868 Atlas of Herkimer County, New York, published by Stranahan and Nichols. Below: Other Houpt properties in the town.
  • Grandson Henry Haupt (1803-1870) was born on May 20, 1803. In about 1833, at the age of 30, he married Agnes Slaughter (1810-1858) of Newville, NY, daughter of New York legislator Cornelius Sloughter/Slaughter. Their four known children were Franklin C. Haupt, Lewis Henry Haupt, Elizabeth Haupt and Chauncey Houpt Sr. When the federal census enumeration was made in 1850, the Houpts were farmers of Danube, Herkimer County, NY. The family was plunged into grief when Agnes died on April 1, 1858. Burial was in Houpt Cemetery in Danube, NY. Henry died exactly a dozen years later, on April 1, 1870, at the age of 66 years, 10 months and 14 days.

    Great-grandson Franklin C. Haupt (1831-1851) was born in 1831. Tragically, he accidentally shot and killed himself at the age of 19 or 20 in March 1851 when a loaded gun he was carrying, as he tried to cross a fence, fired in his hands. The remains were lowered into the soil of Houpt Cemetery in Danube, NY. The nature of his death was reported in the 1901 obituary of his sister Elizabeth Tibbitts.

    Great-grandson Lewis Henry Haupt (1839- ? ) was born in about 1839 and grew up learning the farming business from his father in Danube, NY.

    Great-granddaughter Elizabeth Haupt (1842-1901) was born on Nov. 15, 1842 in Newville, Herkimer County, NY. In 1870, she was joined in wedlock with Dr. William Tibbitts (Oct. 1838-1908), originally from Stillwater, Saratoga County, NY.. Together, they produced a trio of sons -- William D. Tibbitts (1871-1943), Mortimer B. Tibbitts (1872-1888)and Henry Houpt Tibbitts (1875-1965). William was an 1867 graduate of Bellevue Medical College. Elizabeth surrendered to the spectre of death at the age of 58, in Newville, on Sept. 15, 1901. An obituary said she had died suddenly of "cardiac difficulty." William survived for another seven years. He passed away on March 11, 1908.  Their remains sleep for the ages in Houpt Cemetery.

    Great-grandson Chauncey Houpt (1846-1903) was born in 1846 in Newville, Herkimer County, NY. He entered into marriage with Amelia A. Walrath ( ? - ? ). Three sons were born into this family -- Henry Houpt, Chancey Houpt Jr. (1887-1914) and Samuel Houpt. Chauncey is believed in 1888 to have been elected as a Herkimer County Republican delegate to the state convention in Utica. His name again was in the newspapers in the first week of July 1899 when his barn and horse barn were struck by lightning and burned to the ground. Said The Earth of Burlington, VT, "This fire was started about 4 o'clock in the morning, and at the time the family was in the barn engaged in milking. The cows were released, but seven calves in the basement perished. Some of the members of the family had a narrow escape and were knocked senseless by the shock." Chauncey died at the age of 56 in Newville on Jan. 14, 1903. Burial was in the Houpt Cemetery in nearby Danube, Herkimer County. 

  • Granddaughter Nancy Haupt I (1805-1806) only lived for about a year and died in 1806. 
  • Granddaughter Nancy Haupt II (1806-1893) was born on May 29, 1806 in New York and named for an older, deceased sister. She was joined in wedlock with John Henry Dysslin (May 27, 1799-1877), also spelled "Dyelin" and "Dyslin," of Newville, NY. Federal census records for 1850 show the family living on a farm next door to Nancy's widowed father and adult siblings in Danube, Herkimer County, NY. They moved to Illinois in 1864 during the Civil War and planted themselves in Carroll County, IL. The Dysslins became the parents of seven -- Eliza Dysslin, Ann Alida "Lide" Bellinger, Sarah Catherine Little, Franklin "Frank" Dysslin, Lewis Henry Dysslin, Morris Dysslin and Clark Dysslin. Sadly, two of the offspring died in childhood, Eliza in 1832 at about age six and son John Henry in 1830 in infancy. The angel of death cleaved John away at the age of 78 on Oct. 23, 1877. Burial was in Lanark City Cemetery. Nancy endured as a widow for another 15 years. She passed away on March 28, 1893. The Freeport Weekly Standard said that services were held in the home of her married daughter Sarah Little, by the hand of Rev. Marcus Lane, followed by interment in Lanark. 

    Great-granddaughter Ann Alida "Lida" Dysslin (1828-1865) was born on Aug. 22, 1828. She was united in matrimony with farmer and carpenter George N. Bellinger (1823- ? ) of Herkimer County. His middle initial also has been given as "H." George stood 5 feet, 7½ inches tall and bore brown hair and blue eyes, with a light complexion. The newlyweds made their residence in the household of her parents in 1850 in Danube, Herkimer County, NY. They are believed to have borne two sons, Henry F. Bellinger (born 1850) and Charles G. Bellinger (1852-1930), both of whom became carpenters. The 1860 United States Census shows this family in Utica, Oneida County, NY. Evidence suggests that George joined the Union Army during the Civil War, enlisting on Jan. 4, 1864 at Wheeler, NY. He was assigned to the 8th New York Heavy Artillery, Company A. George was absent from the regiment in April 1865 and was granted a discharge on May 30, 1865. Immediately upon his return home, he filed for a military pension and it was awarded effective July 31, 1865 [Invalid App. #80.342 - Cert. #107.258] Sadly, Lida died that very same year in 1865. The widowed George married a second time to Sarah (1846- ? ) and continued to ply his trade as a carpenter in Utica. Son George was twice-wed, first to Louise Evans (1858-1913) and in 1913, at age 60, to 43-year-old Cora M. Claus (1867- ? ) of Rome, NY. George died in 1930, with burial in Utica's Forest Hill Cemetery.

    Great-granddaughter Sarah Catherine Dysslin (1831-1919) was born on Oct. 28, 1831 in New York. In Massachusetts, on April 9, 1857, she wed Charles H. Little (Dec. 7, 1832-1914). They moved to Illinois a year later in 1858 and settled in Freeport, Stephenson County, IL. As such, they were considered pioneer residents of the community and stayed for the balance of the decades of their lives. One known daughter of this family was Ellen May Little. Charles started his own business, C.H. Little & Company, a firm which dealt in china, crockery, glassware and toys. He "met with almost immediate success and for many years was one of the successful and prominent business men of the community," said the Freeport Journal-Standard. "During his business career he amassed a considerable fortune in Freeport, being interested also in other enterprises in other cities." Charles died in 1914, leaving an estate estimated between $200,000 and $300,000. Under the terms of his will, Sarah was to inherit $50,000 with another $25,000 to be used to build a home for the aged in Freeport. The rest of the assets were to be distributed among a host of others under a wide range of conditions and stipulations. When Sarah renounced his terms of the document, she thus inherited half of the estate. Sarah's final address was with her brother Morris at 418 Stephenson Street. She died in Freeport on July 16, 1919. Burial took place in Freeport's Oakland Cemetery. The Journal-Standard said in an obituary that her "death was not unexpected, as she had been in failing health for some time and had been critically ill for the last ten days. She was well known throughout the entire community and her taking off brings grief to a wide circle of friends and acquaintances." She left the sum of $25,000 to her brother Morris, $5,000 to her brother Franklin, $8,000 each to the children of her brother Clark and deceased siblings Lida Bellinger and Lewis Dyslin, and $13,000 to her nephew Clayton A. Porter of Fairmont, MN, among other bequests.

    Great-grandson Franklin "Frank" Dysslin (1834-1924) was born on July 26, 1834 in Herkimer County, NY. When he was 21 years of age, on Jan. 10, 1856, he married Ursula M. Cison (1838-1900). They relocated to Carroll County, IL and established a longtime home in a community named for the family, Dysslin Valley. Frank and Ursula produced a family of at least four offspring -- Nancy Aurand (1856-1947), Mattie E. Dyslin, Frankie B. Aurand (1867-1941) and Roy Dyslin (1872-1888). Sadly, daughter Mattie died at the age of about two in 1862. Then circa 1891, they pulled up stakes and made a move to Milledgeville, IL, where they stayed for good. Said the Polo (IL) Tri-County Press, Frank "was a quiet and reserved man but a man of observation and well read and a good conversationalist because of a wide range of reading. Kind and thoughtful of his family and neighbors and always ready to lend a helping hand. He was a faithful attendant of the M.E. church for many years..." He became a member of the Masons and was elevated to masteer in the Shannon lodge in 1879 and later moved his membership to the Lanark chapter of the Royal Arch Masons. He had an "intense interest in the work and life of Masonry," said the Press, " as well as his love for his brethren [which] was an outstanding fact of his life."  When he was about 61 years of age, in 1895, Frank received an inheritance of $2,000 from the estate of his wealthy aunt Eliza (Houpt) Church. Sadly, Ursula died on Jan. 3, 1900, bringing to a close their union of nearly 44 years' duration. He passed away in his home at the age of 90 on Oct. 31, 1924. His pastor, Rev. E.Y. Knapp, officiated the funeral services in the family church. Interment was in Lanark City Cemetery in Carroll County. A short death notice was printed in the Lanark Gazette. As of 1924, only two of their four offspring were living, daughter Nancy in Rockford, IL, and Frankie in Milledgeville.

    Great-grandson Lewis Henry Dyslin (1836-1908) was born on Christmas Day 1836 and grew up on a farm in Danube, NY. He made the migration to Illinois with his family. Lewis entered into marriage with Arminda Jane Wilcox (Oct. 16, 1842-1922), daughter of Nelson and Elizabeth (Walrod) Wilcox of Danube. The pair's brood of offspring included John Nelson Dyslin, Sarah E. Wilkin, Franklin Benjamin Dyslin, Morris E. Dyslin and George Dyslin. They grieved when daughter Annette died at the age of 11 on Nov. 17, 1873. Lewis is known to have received an inheritance of $1,000 from the estate of his aunt Eliza (Houpt) Church circa 1895. The angel of death cleaved away Lewis on Dec. 20, 1908, just five days shy of his 72nd birthday. His remains were lowered under the sod of Cherry Grove Brethren Cemetery in Lanark, IL. Their son George moved to Minnesota and in 1897 was in Fairmount, MN.

    Great-grandson Morris Dyslin (1839-1924) was born on March 10, 1839 in Newville, Herkimer County, NY and spent his early years in a farming home in Danube, NY. On Jan. 23, 1861, Morris was joined in wedlock with Frances "Fannie" Fralick (April 16, 1839-1911), also of Herkimer County. Four children of the pair were Charles Dyslin ( ? -Nov. 8, 1893), Clark Dyslin, Philo Dyslin and Addie A. Wolf (1867-1910). The family in 1862 relocated to Illinois and first planted themselves in Freedom Township, Carroll County, IL. In time they moved to Cherry Grove Township and eventually on March 6, 1900 into the town of Lanark. They were members of the local Christian Church. Morris acquired a 240-acre farm located seven miles north of Lanark and sold it in 1894 to John Keltner. He also owned land in Cherry Grove near Lanark and sold it in 1911 to Alvin Sword. Morris received an inheritance of $1,000 from the estate of his aunt Eliza (Houpt) Church circa 1895. Sadness swept through the family when Fannie passed away at home on Sept. 15, 1911. An obituary in the Tri-County Press said she "has been ailing for a long time and failed rapidly the last few weeks." Funeral services were held at the Christian Church, by the hand of Rev. Cresmer. Death enveloped him at the age of 85, in the home of his son Clark in Lanark, on Aug. 28, 1924. His obituary was carried in the Freeport Journal-Standard. Their son Charles, a member of the Stephen A. Douglas Garrison of the Knights of the Globe, died at the age of 31 on Nov. 11, 1893, leaving a widow and small child. His life insurance policy with the KGMBA was approved for a $2,000 payout to the widow.

    Great-grandson Clark Dysslin (1841-1914) was born on Nov. 23, 1841 in Montgomery County, NY. He migrated to Illinois in 1864. Clark was united in matrimony with Eugenia Wilcox (May 3, 1844-1906), daughter of Nelson and Elizabeth (Walrod) Wilcox of Danube, NY. Their trio of known children were Lewis Henry Dyslin (1865-1939), Ursula Elizabeth Wilkin (1867-1909) and Walter Dyslin (1869-1916). Clark made news in November 1894 when "waiting to have a load of grain weighed at the elevator," reported the Freeport Daily Journal, his team of horses "became frightened and ran away, throwing him out and wrecking the wagon on Devore avenue. Then then took cross lots for home, going through several barb wire fences, cutting themselves, but not badly." Sadly, having suffered from cancer for two years, Eugenia passed away on March 19, 1906. A notice of her death was made in the Daily Bulletin, and Clark's sister Sarah Little is known to have traveled to Lanark for funeral services. Clark outlived her by about eight years. He announced plans in February 1908 to build a new barn, measuring 100 feet by 164 feet, featuring 26-foot posts and a 20-foot cattle shed on each side. Then in about 1908, he moved to Iowa and remained for the final five years of his life. In Aurelia, IA, he surrendered to the spirit of death at the age of 72 on Jan.23, 1914. The Freeport Journal-Standard published an obituary, and his corpse was returned to Illinois for burial. with Rev. Knapp of the Methodist Epicopal Church conducting funeral rites. The couple sleeps for the ages in Lanark City Cemetery in Carroll County, IL.

  • Lewis' grave, Houpt Cemetery
    Courtesy Havergirl Doherty
    Grandson Lewis Henry Haupt (1810-1853) was born on Aril 26, 1810. When he was 34 years of age, on May 26, 1844, he wed Caroline Frances Benedict (Nov. 4, 1825-1879). A trio of children were born into this union -- Sarah Spencer, Annie C. Elwood and Lewis W. Haupt. Lewis died on Nov. 14, 1853 (or 1855), as inscribed on his grave marker, bringing to a close their union of just 10 years' duraction. Caroline lived for nearly a quarter-century longer, dying on St. Patrick's Day 1879.  Her remains were laid to rest beside her husband's in the Houpt Cemetery in Danube, NY. 

    Great-granddaughter Sarah E. "Sally" Haupt (1846- ? ) was born in about 1846 in or near Danube, Herkimer County, NY. She entered into marriage with Frank E. Spencer ( ? - ? ). She was named in the will of her aunt, Eliza (Houpt) Church, and was given $1,000 in cash from the estate circa 1895.

    Great-granddaughter Anna C. "Annie" Haupt (1848- ? ) was born in about 1848 in or near Danube, Herkimer County, NY. Anna wed Isaac Elwood ( ? - ? ). She was named in the will of her aunt, Eliza (Houpt) Church, and was given $1,000 in cash from the estate circa 1895.

    Great-grandson Lewis W. Haupt ( ? - ? )

  • Grandson Chauncey Haupt (1815-1845) was born on March 25, 1815. Little is known of his life. Death spirited him away into eternity on Sept. 14, 1845, at the age of 32 years, five months and 20 days. His remains lie within the sacred soil of the family's Houpt Cemetery in Danube, NY.
  • Granddaughter Eliza Houpt (1816-1895) was born on March 25, 1816. She did not marry until in her mid-30s and in early 1850 shared a home with her widowed father and niece Sarah C. Dyslin in Danube, Herkimer County, NY. On Dec. 18, 1850, she entered into marriage with 48-year-old Dr. Jefferson Church (Oct. 20, 1802-1885), a native of Middlefield, MA. Three children or stepchildren in this family were Eliza C. Church, Mattie Church and William Hyde Church. In young manhood, prior to marriage, Jefferson studied medicine in Castleton, VA and graduated from the Pittsfield Medical College. Then then studied under a mentor, Dr. William Tully, later publishing Tully's book Materia Medica or Pharmcology and Therapeutics. Jefferson first came to Boston in about 1825, then returned to Middlefield, and came back shortly and remained in Boston for good.  In 1840, he took part in the Massachusetts State Convention held in Worcester and Springfield, and he was elected president of the body, and famed abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison was named to a business committee. At that gathering, slavery and pro-slavery churches were denounced, and the call made that "no abolitionist could give his vote for William Henry Harrison or Martin Van Buren, without compromising his prniciples, and dishonoring his profession." Garrison's committees made two resolutions, first, "That the enslavement of one-sixth of the people of this country ought to silence forever all its claims to Christianity, republicanism, or civilization; it ought to cover us as a nation, and those of us who silent give their assent to it, as individuals, with the infany that attaches to the greatest of crimes." The second was "That slaveholding is a moral offence against God and man -- and not to be cleared away by influence short of heartfelt repentence and moral reformation." In 1849, he presided at an Anti-Slavery Convention in Springfield, with Garrison's famed newspaper, the Boston Liberator, calling him "a true and steadfast friend of the slave."  In that meeting, said the Liberator, the representatives passed three resolutions, as follow:

    1. Resolved, That inasmuch as (in the language of the late Judge Story) it is 'historically well known' that one of the objects of the United States Constitution was 'to secure to the citizens of the Slaveholding States, the complete right and title of ownership in their slaves, AS PROPERTY , in every State of the Union;' and inasmuch, also, as (in the language of Judge Baldwin) 'the foundations of the government are laid, and rest on the right of property in slaves;' we do, therefore, affirm, that such a Constitution and Government are fitly described by the prophet's language as 'a covenant with death, and an agreement with hell,' and are of such a nature that no honest and free man can consistently uphold them, or be in any wise a partner to them; and the law of God, and the dictates of a sound judgment and an enlightened policy, alike require that we should all cease from any connection with them. 2. Resolved, That we, therefore, reaffirm our great principle of No UNION WITH SLAVEHOLDERS,' and summon every humane, honest and God-fearing soul, to come to this only unchanging standard of truth and right. 3. Resolved, That the Religion and the Church which countenance and fellowship Slavery, inasmuch as they are thereby upholding the 'sum of all villanies,' are the most deadly foes to Christ, and the most thorough infidels to his religion, anywhere to be found, and should never receive the countenance and fellowship of any honest and Christian man. 

    Dr. Jefferson Church's dear abolitionist friends, L-R: John Brown, William Lloyd Garrison, Wendell Phillips - Library of Congress

    Then in 1856, he was elected vice president of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society in a meeting at Boston's Williams Hall, and throughout the Civil War remained active with the organization. Federal census records for 1860-1880 show the pair in Springfield, Hampden County, MA, with him continuing his medical practice, and in 1860, 19-year-old live-in maid Margaret Shehan was in the household. Their boarders in 1870 included a butcher, milliner and dressmaker, and in 1880 a nurse. In 1880, he presented petitions in the Massachusetts House of Representatives promoting the cause of women's right to vote, known as "suffrage." Sadly, Jefferson died in 1885 at the age of 83. An obituary in the Boston Globe said he "was well known to the older residents of the city, but for nearly three years past has been confined to his bed a great portion of the time... In the old days of slavery he devoted much time to the abolition movement. When he lived where the opera house now stands his dwelling frequently contained one or more fugitive slaves, who were in hiding until an opportunity should offer for going to Canada or elsewhere. He was a warm friend of such men as John Brown, Wendell Phillips, William Lloyd Garrison, Parker Pillsbury and others, whose names have become identified with the history of the abolition of slavery." Pillsbury preached the funeral oratory, with no music or prayer, and the pallbearers were six Bostonians who were Black -- Wesley Francks, Eli Baptist, Thomas Thomas, H.O. Tremann, James B. Adams and J.N. Howard.

    Eliza outlived him by a decade and moved to Freeport, IL where a niece was living. Death claimed her in March 1895. An article in the local Daily Democrat said she was the aunt of Mrs. C.H. Little and was "quite wealthy and a lady of advanced ideas. She was in sympathy with woman's suffrage and remembered the cause very handsomely in her last testament." An obituary in the Boston Evening Transcript said her husband "Was for some fifty years one of the prominent physicians in Springfield [and] was well known not only as a physician, but as an abolitionist of the most steadfast and aggressive kind when there were few to follow or sustain him." Heer remains were brought back to Springfield for burial. She bequeathed to the Littles  thousands of dollars worth of notes, and an opportunity to buy 80 shares of stock in the First National Bank. She also made bequests of cash to nieces and nephews Nancy Dysslin, Franklyn Dysslin, Lewis Dysslin, Morris Dyslin, Chauncy Houpt, the children of her deceased brother Louis Houpt, and to Sarah and Anna Lewis and a number of others. She also gave $8,000 to Lucy Stone, Mrs. William L. Garrison Jr. and Abby W. May "to advance woman's sufrage in the United States, $200 to woman's suffrage lecturer Margaret Campbell, $1,000 to the trustees of the normal school at Hampton, NY, $500 to the children's home in Springfield, MA, $500 to the home for the friendless in Springfield, and $300 to the Index publishing firm of Boston.

    Great-granddaughter Eliza C. Church ( ? - ? ) 

    Great-granddaughter Mattie Church ( ? - ? ).

    Great-grandson William Hyde Church (1833-1914) was born on Sept. 15, 1833 in Springfield, MA. He was married to Katherine VanNess Tinslar (1832-1878). They became the parents of Jefferson Church II (1869-1943) and Elizabeth L. Church (1866-1927). William moved to New York and for four decades dwelled in Brooklyn, from about 1874 to the end of his life. He was employied in the field of banking and retired from the Bank of America. For his last 10 years, he was an invalid, making a home at the address of 270 Lefferts Place. William died in Brooklyn on June 27, 1914. Interment was in the city's Green-Wood Cemetery. Rev. Dr. Frank M. Townley, rector of St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church, led the funeral rites. An obituary appeared in the Brooklyn Times Union

  • Granddaughter Catherine Haupt (1818-1872) was born on Dec. 15, 1818. On St. Patrick's Day 1839, at the age of 20, she was joined in wedlock with Dr. William Morris of Utica, NY. They bore three sons -- Dr. William H. Morris, Dr. Charles H. Morris and Samuel H. Morris. Catherine passed away into the arms of the angels on Dec. 3, 1872.

    Great-grandson Dr. William H. Morris ( ? - ? )

    Great-grandson Dr. Charles H. Morris ( ? - ? )

    Great-grandson Samuel H. Morris ( ? - ? )

Son John "Jacob" Haupt (1776-1828) was born on April 27, 1776. Circa 1816, in Philadelphia, the 40-year-old Jacob married a Haupt cousin, 30-year-old Anna Margaretta (Wiall) Snyder (July 22, 1786-1857), daughter of Peter and Elizabeth (Haupt) Wiall. Anna brought a son to the marriage, Charles Jacob Snyder, with the boy later taking on the Haupt name. The couple settled in "old Philadelphia," where Jacob earned a living as a merchant. The children borne by this union were Hermann Haupt, Ellen Haupt, Henrietta Bennett Archambault, Thomas Jefferson Haupt, Jacob "Lewis" Leeds Haupt and Mary Elizabeth Haupt. He is said to have "lost his business in the War of 1812 and been forced to work as a bookkeeper in a wholesale grocery," according to a narrative about his son Herman in the 2015 paper A General Chronology of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, Its Predecessors and Successors, by Christopher T. Baer. The same son's entry in American National Biography says that Jacob was "a businessman of modest attainments, and Anna Margaretta Wiall, the proprietor of a small dry goods store. Herman attended several private schools in Philadelphia, but in 1827 his father, suffering from poor health, gave up the grocery store he then owned and moved to Woodville, New Jersey. Jacob Haupt died the next year, leaving his widow in straitened circumstances." Sadly, Jacob passed away on Sept. 30, 1828, in or near Albany, NY, said to have been en route to see his brother Samuel of Newville, Herkimer County, NY. It appears that he arrived in Albany in late September 1828 "in an extremely debilitated situation [and] found on the Pier," reported the Albany Daily Advertiser, as reprinted in the Oct. 7, 1828 edition of the Farmer's Herald of St. Johnsbury, VT. 

He was unable to speak, and appears somewhat deranged. He had come up the previous evening, in the steamboat Albany. -- He is genteelly dressed and has a trunk containing good clothes, and some money. He whistles often as if calling a dog. On being asked if his dog's name was "Bull, Rover," &c. he made no answer, but when the name "Watch" was mentioned, nodded his head, and with great difficulty muttered out "yes." On his trunk, is a label -- "Jacob Houpt, Utica County." Mr. Vosburgh, a cartman of this city, humanely took him to his house, where he is now receiving the most kind treatment, and has medical assistance. It is desired that printers may give this circulation.

The widowed Anna Margaretta outlived her husband by several decades. In 1840, the artist John Neagle (1796-1865) painted her portrait. The work on canvas measures 27 inches by 23 inches. It was handed down in the family to a great-granddaughter, Mrs. J. Frederick M. Stewart, and thence to Marguerite A.C. Stewart. In 1963, Marguerite donated the portrait to the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, DC where it is part of the permanent collection [63.17]. The painting is referenced in Vol. 1 of the Corcoran's 1966 catalogue of American paintings, "Painters Born Before 1850." Anna Margaretta passed away on Aug. 24, 1857. Her remains were laid to rest in Laurel Hill Cemetery. 

Above: At left, Herman inspects wreckage after the Second Battle of Fredericksburg, VA. Below: Herman overseeing construction of wartime excavations for the "Y" at Devereux Station along the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Library of Congress.
  • Gen. Herman Haupt - Library of Congress
    Grandson Gen. Hermann Haupt (1817-1905) -- later spelled "Heerman" -- was born on March 26, 1817 in Philadelphia. He was 12 years of age at his father's untimely death and went to work to support his widowed mother and siblings. At the age of 14, he was appointed to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point by President Andrew Jackson. Upon graduation, with high honors, he was named professor of engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. Herman on Aug. 30, 1838 was united in matrimony with 17-year-old Ann "Cecelia" Keller ( ? -1891), daughter of Rev. Dr. Benjamin and Catharine Eliza (Craver/Schaeffer) Keller of Gettysburg, PA. At the time of the marriage, she was said by the Harrisburg Telegraph to be "the belle of Gettysburg. Her lovable disposition, constant cheerfulness and bright mind made her a great favorite in social circles, so that when [Herman] led her to the altar he was regarded as a most fortunate young man. She was then only 17, but together the happy couple started life and they traveled hand in hand..." Together, the couple produced a brood of 11 children -- John Stenger Haupt, Jacob Benjamin Haupt, Lewis Muhlenberg Haupt, Mary Cecelia Haupt, Ella Catherine Chapman, Ada Rosalind Haupt, Dr. Herman Haupt, Charles Edgar Haupt, Frank Spangler Haupt, Alexander James Derbyshire Haupt and Grace Hermania Haupt. Grief cascaded over the family when three of the offspring died young -- John at age three in 1843, Ada Rosalind in 1851 at age one and Grace Hermania at age one. For a time they resided in Harrisburg at Front and Locust Streets and also on Market Street. Herman gained fame during the Civil War as a railroad engineer and gained the nickname "Lincoln's railroad man" and "wonder worker" for an ability to span rivers in a single night for armies to cross. He was the author of Reminiscences of General Herman Haupt, 1901. He was profiled in Appleton's Cyclopaedia of American Biography, which reads:

    He was graduated at the U. S. military academy in 1835, and entered the 2d infantry, but resigned on 30 Sept. following, and was assistant engineer on the public works of Pennsylvania until 1839. He was appointed in 1844 professor of civil engineering and mathematics in Pennsylvania college, Gettysburg, and filled that chair until 1847, when he became principal engineer of the Philadelphia and Columbia railroad, of which he was made superintendent in 1849. From 1856 till June, 1861, he was chief engineer of the Hoosac tunnel in Massachusetts. During the civil war he was aide to Gen. Irwin McDowell, with the rank of colonel, and chief of the bureau of U. S. military railways, in charge of construction and operation. In September, 1862, he declined the appointment of brigadier-general of volunteers. In 1875 he acted as general manager of the Piedmont air-line railway from Richmond, Va., to Atlanta, Ga. Since 1875 he has been chief engineer of the Tide-water pipe line company, and he has demonstrated the feasibility of transporting oil in pipes for long distances. He was also for several years general manager of the Northern Pacific railroad. Col. Haupt invented a drilling-engine, which took the highest prize of the Royal polytechnic society of Great Britain. He is the author of "Hints on Bridge Building " (1840); “General Theory of Bridge-Construction" (New York, 1852); "Plan for Improvement of the Ohio River" (1855); and "Military Bridges" (New York, 1864).

    Above: Herman on his invention, a pontoon boat for scouting. Below: one of his bridges on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad line, the type of which Lincoln once said has "nothing in it but cornstalks and beanpoles." Library of Congress

    The Haupts marked their golden wedding anniversary in 1888 at their summer home at Spring Lake, Giles County, VA. Recruited by Rev. Dr. J.G. Butler, they were influential donors to a legacy project, new Lutheran church erected at the corner of Maryland Avenue and Ninth Street Northeast in the District of Columbia. Sadly, Cecelia died before the project could be completed. She passed away in April 1891, bringing to a close her and Herman's marital union of 53 years' duration. Burial was in Philadelphia's Laurel Hill Cemetery. It was dedicated on Oct. 3, 1892, in memory of Cecelia's father and named "Keller Memorial Lutheran Church." The first pastor was Rev. Charles H. Butler. The church was pictured in a February 1922 edition of the Washington (DC) Herald along with the story of the Haupts' "splendid liberality." As a measure of Herman's standing, he is named on several pages of the great multi-volume biography by Carl Sandburg, Abraham Lincoln: The War Years. The list of their children is spelled out in William Henry Egle's 1896 book Pennsylvania Genealogies; Chiefly Scotch-Irish and German (Harrisburg Publishing Company).

    Great-grandson Jacob Benjamin Haupt (1842-1903) was born on April 20, 1842. He was baptized in infancy 15 days later on May 5, 1842 in St. James Evangelical Lutheran Church of Gettysburg. On Nov. 8, 1866, he tied the knot with Mary Elizabeth Ziegler (May 18, 1846-1911). Four known children of this union were Charles Ziegler Haupt (born 1867), Edward Haupt (1869), Catharine "Katie" Sturdevant (1876-1967) and Anna Cecelia Haupt (1879). Federal census records for 1870 and 1880 show the Haupts in Philadelphia, on 32nd Street, with Jacob engaged as a civil engineer. Jacob died in Manhattan, NY on May 8, 1903. A handwritten record of his death, in German, was made in the papers of the East 68th Street Church of Manhattan. Son Edward wed Charlotte Maud Wistar ( ? - ? ), and in turn their son Caspar Wistar Haupt was accepted into the Sons of the American Revolution on the service of his mother's ancestor Hartman Deitsh/Deutsch (1750-1815).

    Great-grandson Lewis Muhlenberg Haupt (1844- 1937) was born on March 21, 1844 in Gettysburg, PA. He also became an engineer of renown. In 1873, Lewis married Isabella Christina "Belle" Cromwell (1852-1912). Five offspring they bore together were Lewis H. Haupt (1889-1956), Bessie M. Haupt (1879-1966), Florence Urner (1883-1957), Susan Adamson (1885-1974) and Mrs. A. Lodge Oliver ( ? - ? ). In sending out wedding cards, they included the editor of the newspaper in Austin, TX where he once had been stationed under the command of Gen. Canby. Their wedding was held on June 26, 1873. Lewis was employed by the University of Pennsylvania as a professor of civil engineering and authored many related textbooks. His profile in Appleton's Cyclopaedia of American Biography states that Lewis: 

    ...was educated at the Lawrence scientific school of Harvard, and at the U. S. military academy, where he was graduated in 1867. He was lieutenant of engineers in the lake surveys in 1868, and in 1869 engineer officer of the 5th military district, Texas. He resigned in August of that year, and was appointed engineer of Fairmount park, Philadelphia. In April, 1872, he became assistant examiner in the U. S. patent-office, and in September of that year he was chosen assistant professor of civil and mechanical engineering in the University of Pennsylvania, and soon thereafter professor of civil engineering, which chair he still (1887) fills. Prof. Haupt, in April, 1886, patented an automatic system for improving rivers and harbors, and of maintaining channels by an adjustable deflecting shield, suspended by buoys, floats, or barges. He is editor of the "American Engineering Register," and has published Engineering Specifications and Contracts (Philadelphia, 1878); "Working Drawings, and How to Make and Use Them" (Philadelphia, 1881); and "The Topographer-his Methods and Instruments" (Philadelphia, 1884).

    Lewis' profile in the 1898 book Prominent and Progressive Pennsylvanians of the Nineteenth Century, Vol. III, reads as follows:

    Professor Haupt's boyhood was spent in an atmosphere of science and engineering. He attended the Philadelphia public schools for a short time, and later the famous old Germantown Academy came in for a share of his educational training. Owing to his delicate health, out-of-door exercise was recommended for him in place of the schoolroom. At the age of fourteen his father removed to Massachusetts to survey and construct the Hoosac Tunnel Line, from Troy to Greenfield, and it was on this work that Professor Haupt began his practical experience as level rodman. During the severest winter weather his time was spent at the Greenfield and Cambridge High Schools, and later at the Lawrence Scientific School, where he began a course of studies preparatory to entering the University of Pennsylvania. After a short and special course at the latter institution he was appointed by President Lincoln to the cadetship at West Point, in the fall of 1863. Four years later Professor Haupt was graduated and immediately assigned to duty in the United States Corps of Engineers. His first work in the service was with a party then conducting the triangulation of Lake Superior. In February, 1869, he was transferred to the Mexican border to act as aid on the staff of Gen. E. R. S. Canby and his successor, General Reynolds. He resigned that position in September of the same year, and it was here the formative period may be said to have terminated and the application to the problems of civil life to have begun. He next accepted a position as Assistant Engineer and Topographer in charge of the survey of Fairmount Park, Philadelphia. He was engaged in this work for several years, collating the data for an elaborate contour map, and locating and constructing the drives, drains and other engineering features of this peerless pleasure-ground. In 1872 he again entered the public service, being appointed to the post of Assistant Examiner, United States Patent Office, Department of Engineering. He resigned his position in a few months, however, in order to accept the Professorship of Civil Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania, and for twenty years he discharged the duties incident to that position with the same fidelity and ability that had always characterized his work. Up to the time of his joining that great institution of learning, his life had been spent in gaining experience. The position offered to him such opportunities that he could make good use of it, both as a student and as an instructor. His long summer vacations were spent in practical engineering work. He held the appointments of Engineer on the Fourth Lighthouse District in charge of surveys for range lights in the Delaware River, and Assistant in the United States Coast and Geodetic Surveys, being in charge of the geodesy of Pennsylvania. He was one of the Commissioners in the Lake Erie and Ohio River ship canal. He was also the Associate Judge to report on the transportation features of the Paris Exposition. While connected with the coast survey he made a critical examination of all the old maps and harbors with a view to noting the changes of channels and bars. This study resulted in the discovery of a law which governed the formation of ocean bars and led to suggestions for their prevention and removal and for the improvement of harbors. His discoveries in physical hydrography and his invention of a system of harbor improvements were esteemed of such moment that the American Philosophical Society awarded him the Gold Medal of the Magellanic Premium, an honor so rare that only twice in a century has any paper been submitted that has been considered worthy of it. Professor Haupt's interest in waterways and water transportation became so absorbing that, in 1893, he resigned from the University in order to devote all his time to the subject. He was the first President of the Engineers' Club of Philadelphia, and is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, American Philosophical Society, Franklin Institute, the Geographical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Consulting Engineer for the Trades League of Philadelphia, and Chairman of the Colombia-Cauca Arbitration Committee, selected by the State Department to settle the dispute as to the amount of indemnity between the contending parties. In July, 1897, he was appointed by the President one of the three members of the Nicaragua Canal Commission, to determine a proper route and the feasibility and cost of this important commercial highway for all nations. He is the author of many books, publications, serials and contributions to the scientific literature of the day.

    Additional of his books were A Move for Better Roads (1891) and The Transportation Crisis (1907). Lewis also was interested in his Haupt genealogy. In 1925, he arranged for an entry in the book The Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy by Frederick Adams Virkush. The note shows his lineage from 1738 immigrant Sebastian Haupt to their son Johann Henry married to Catharine Younken. He died in Bala Cynwyd at the age of 92 on March 10, 1937.

      
    Brothers Rev. Lewis M. Haupt (left) and Rev. Alexander J.D. Haupt
    Courtesy Google Books

    Great-granddaughter Mary Cecelia Haupt (1846-1911) was born in 1846. She resided in Philadelphia and was single for her entire life. As her health failed, she was admitted to Lansdale Hospital in Montgomery Township. Montgomery County. There, having contracted gangrene of the lung which lingered for two months, she died on May 1, 1911. There was no informant on the death certificate, and thus no details about her life. Burial was in Philadelphia.

    Great-granddaughter Ella Catherine Haupt (1848-1918) was born on July 23, 1848. On Nov. 13, 1873, in Philadelphia, she entered into marriage with Civil War veteran Frederic Lord Chapman (May 23, 1848-1934), also known as "Fred," of Cambridge, MA. Their wedding announcement in the Boston Globe asked that no cards of congratulation be sent. Their children were Dr. Herman Haupt Chapman, Lucy Lord Chapman, Eleanor Hassel Reif and Marion Norton Chapman. Frederic served in the 12th Unattended Company of Massachusetts Infantry during the war. Circa 1876, Fred is believed to have been clerk and treasurer of the Troy and Greenfield Railroad Company in Massachusetts. As of 1883, he was employed as general agent for the Northern Pacific Coal Company, with his father-in-law serving as general manager and brother-in-law Herman Jr. also involved. Then in 1885, Fred and Herman Jr. jointly filed to incorporate the American Patent Rights Insurance Company in St. Paul, MN to protect their inventions against infringement. Frederick was awarded a soldier's pension on May 25, 1910. [Invalid App. #1.390.685 - Cert. 1.161.165 - C #2.468.063] Ella died in in or near St. Paul on Feb. 28, 1918. Burial was in the city's Oakland Cemetery. Frederic outlived his wife by 16-plus years. He passed away in or near St. Paul on July 17, 1834.

    The Chapmans' daughter Eleanor H. Chapman (1877-1946) was born in Oct. 1877 in Massachusetts. She married Herbert Kemper Reif ( ? - ? ) in St. Paul on June 6, 1900, with her uncle Rev. Edgar Haupt officiating.

    The Chapmans' daughter Lucy Lord Chapman (1876-1918) was born in June 1876 in Massachusetts. She graduated from a preparatory school in St. Paul in 1895. She died on May 7, 1918.

    The Chapmans' son Dr. Herman Haupt "Chappie" Chapman (1874- ? ) was born in Oct. 1874 in Massachusetts. He was an 1889 graduate of the University of Minnesota and then in 1904 obtained a master of forestry degree at Yale University. His first professional position was with the U.S. Forest Service. He joined Yale's forestry school in 1906 and then in 1911 was named Harriman professor of forest management, continuing for decades until retirement in 1943. Among his books were Forest Valuation (1914), Forest Mensuration (1921), Forest Finance (1926) and Forest Management (1931). Said the Hartford Courant, he "was an early supporter of the state park movement in Connecticut, and upon the creation of the State Park Commission in 1913 was appointed by the Governor as one of the original members. In 1921 he was influential in broadening the scope of the Commission to include forestry, which had formerly been under the Experiment Station in New Haven. He continued as a member of the reorganized Park and Forest Commission, succeeding Lucius Robinson as Chairman form 1938 until 1943; and serving as Vice-Chairman from 1943 to 1944, he completed his long and useful term as commissioner in 1947." Among his forestry interests were public recreation, camping and fishing, fire protection, and landowner education. He held terms as chairman of the Forests and Wild Life Commission and president of the Wild Life Federation of Connecticut. He is known to have helped create state parks such as Hammonasset, Sherwood Island and Rocky Neck. He also helped to conserve the forests of the Chippewa nation in support of Chief Forester Gifford Pinchot in the administration of President Theodore Roosevelt. Active in the public administration of forests, he opposed a move to transfer the Forest Service out of the Department of Agriculture, and fought the idea of moving large tracts such as the Olympic National Forest to the Parks Service, on the argument that "much of the area was better suited to timber production than to recreation," said the Courant. He has also taken a prominent part in the fight against the western stock men to gain possession a large areas in the national forests for their own selfish interests." The University of Minnesota awarded him with an honorary doctorate in 1947, saying he had "influenced the course of forest conservation in the United States as profoundly as any single man." In 1949, he received the Schlich Memorial Medal from the Society of American Foresters in recognition of his work, only the fifth man at the time to be so recognized. That same year, he chaired the 7th Pacific Science Congress held in New Zealand. He researched and collected his grandfather Haupt's business and personal correspondence, financial and legal papers, and writings, and then authored an unpublished biography. He donated these documents, photographs, additional family correspondence, diaries, and other papers to Yale University.

    The Chapman's daughter Marion Norton Chapman (1879- ? ) was born in April 1879 in Massachusetts. 

    Great-grandson Dr. Herman H. Haupt Jr. (1852-1925) was born on May 7, 1852. He wed Anna Jameson Medlar (1860-1944). Three of their children were Edwin Irvin Haupt (1883-1936), Helen Whitehead (1891-1967) and Herman H. Haupt III. Herman served as assistant librarian at the University of Pennsylvania until 1890. He was a lawyer and a mechanical engineer, and practiced medicine in Philadelphia. They appear to have had a home on Long Island later in life. At retirement, they relocated in about 1913 to Miami and stayed for good. At the age of 73, in Miami, he was swept away by the grim reaper of death on July 23, 1925. An obituary was published in the Philadelphia Inquirer and the Miami News. The body was shipped back home for interment in West Laurel Hill Cemetery in Bala Cynwyd. A large marker stands at the grave, featuring a carving of a woman holding a wreath in one hand and the cross in the other. Son Herman III dwelled in East Setauket, NY in 1925.

    Great-grandson Rev. Charles "Edgar" Haupt (1854-1942) was born on Aug. 25, 1854 in Philadelphia. He migrated to Minnesota in 1882, at the age of 28. Charles was twice-wed. His first spouse was Mary Bell Griffith ( ? -1885). Sadly, she died on Nov. 28, 1885. His second bride was Alexandra V. Dougan ( ? - ? ). He was the father of Rev. David R. Haupt. He and his brother Frank launched the Haupt Lumber Company in 1883 and it enjoyed growth in the ensuing years. But he was called into Christian ministry, and became rector of the Church of the Messiah in St. Paul. Then from 1903 to 1907, he was vicar of St. Mark's Episcopal Church and then co-rector of the congregation to 1910. Also from 1908 to 1910, he served as superintendent of Wells Memorial Settlement House. In time Edgar was named archdeacon of the Minnesota Episcopal Church, where he is said to have "accomplished wonders" and a leader in religious education. In 1917, he opened the Breck School for boys in St. Anthony Park near Minneapolis. The school classes were first held in a private home and then moved to a new location at 2477 Como Avenue. He always was interested in the Church Home of Minnesota, a home for the aged connected with the Episcopal movement. He resigned from the school in 1938. He died on June 10, 1942. Burial was in Oaklawn Cemetery, with funeral rites conducted in St. Matthew's Church. An obituary appeared in the Minneapolis Daily Times. In his memory, the Breck school established a scholarship program.

    Great-grandson Frank Spangler Haupt (1856-1914) was born on Dec. 3, 1856 at Chestnut Hill, PA. His birthday erroneously also has been given as June 1, 1859. He was an 1882 graduate of Harvard College, having taken an eight-year course, and excelling at hurdle-racing. He established himself in 1881 in St. Paul, MN. On June 25, 1885, in the home of her parents on Summit Avenue in St. Paul, Frank was joined in wedlock with Carol Nichols Dean (1861-1930). Rev. David R. Breed presided, and the happy event was announced on the pages of the St. Paul Globe, which said "It was a quiet, family wedding, but extremely elegant. The bride, richly attired, stood with the groom, and Miss Lelia Dean and Mr. Frank Chapman before a massive bank of brilliant blooms during the ceremony, and fragrant flowers throughout the apartments." One known son of the couple was John Nichols Haupt. The Haupts spent their lives in Minnesota. In 1883, Frank and his brothre Edgar jointly opened a retail lumber company at 251 University Avenue, Haupt Lumber Company. A news article noted that it maintained three lumberyards in town, including one on the line of the St. Paul, Minneapolis  Manitoba Railroad. "There are extensive sheds and buildings necessary to the business," said the Minneapolis Star Tribune. "The company deals in soft pine lumber of all grades, sash, doors, blinds, windows, shingles, lath, building paper and all material usually kept in stock in the business. The yards employ 10 men. Business is good and shows  a very satisfactory increase over last year's trade." He and a number of others incorporated the Northwestern Building of St. Paul in 1888. In 1902, they relocated to Redlands, CA. Their address in 1914 was on Terracina Avenue. Having become seriously ill, Frank pursued treatments at several sanatoriums, but without relief. So in the summer of 1914, he decided to take his own life. And on Aug. 16, 1914, during dinner at home with his wife and family, said the Los Angeles Times, he "left the table, went to his room upstairs, and shot himself through the heart with a shotgun. Death was instantaneous, and when the family, disturbed by the report, reached him a minute later, he had breathed his last." The body was shipped to St. Paul to sleep under the sod of Oakland Cemetery. A brief notice of his death was printed in the Boston Evening Transcript. Caroline outlived her husband by 16 years and in 1917 endured the death of 13-year-old son John at California Hospital. The boy's remains were transported to St. Paul for interment. Carol passed away in 1930.

    Great-grandson Rev. Alexander James Derbyshire Haupt (1858-1934) was born on June 1, 1858/1859 in Greenfield, MA when his father was there overseeing construction of the famed Hoosac Tunnel. He was united in matrimony with Ida Louise Boyer (Oct. 25, 1861- ? ). Together, they produced six children -- Edith A. Haupt, Margaret C. Haupt, John Boyer Haupt (1895-1961), George Edward Haupt, Henry Harpster Haupt (1903-1970) and Rev. James Alexander Haupt (1903-1970). Alexander was a Lutheran Church pastor in St. Paul, MN and described as "a great lecturer who commands attention not only in religion as such but on the family life, eugenics." His credentials were published in Who's Who in America. He was profiled extensively in Rev. J.C. Jensson's book American Lutheran Biographies (Milwaukee, 1890). 

    At the age of seven years he began attending the public school at Chestnut Hill, near Philadelphia, Pa. When nine years old the family moved to Philadelphia where his studies were continued and completed, after eighteen years of school life. He passed through the whole public school course, graduating from the Boys' Central High school, Feb. 14, 1874, standing seventh in a class of twenty-six, of which he was chosen the Valedictorian. From this institution he received as a reward by the high average attained at the final examination, a certificate of distinguished scholarship and also a certificate to teach as a principal in any of the public schools of Philadelphia. Five years after graduation this institution also conferred upon him the degree of Master of Arts. During the last two years of his high school course, his spare moments were engaged in studying Latin and Greek, preparatory to entering college, and his whole time from Feb. 14 to June 12, 1878, was similarly occupied. Then followed a four years' course in the University of Pennsylvania, from which he graduated June 15, 1882, among the second honors, ranking nine in a class of twenty-six; but having taken during his last years at college, also during his first year at the seminary, besides having had fourteen of his fellow pupils to tutor in mathematical physics and astronomy. He also had the honor of being one of the orators of the class at Commencement, which, strange to say, took place just fifty years after that of his uncle, Rev. C. W. Schaeffer, the same institution. Two years later, June, 1884, he graduated from the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia, thus completing his preparatory course of studies; and was ordained at Reading, Pa., Jan. 10, 1884, from whence he departed a few days later, to the field his future labors in St. Paul, Minn. When only three years old he was stricken with a dangerous disease from which his parents never expected him to recover. At the age of twelve he was suddenly taken down with typhoid pneumonia and for one whole week was unconscious. But the good Lord spared him, and as strength returned his pious father said to him one day, "my son, God has spared your life in a marvelous way, now these two times in answer to your mother's prayers mine; do you not think that He intends you for some grand and noble work?” This was the beginning of very serious thought on his part of preparing for the ministry. His confirmation under Rev. J. A. Kunkelman in St. Mark's, Philadelphia, strengthened the conviction. Still there was a doubt and a looking back with longing to the money making opportunities of the world, until he heard an aged disciple of the Lord preach in Richmond, Va., from the text, “Whoso putteth his hand to the plow and looketh back is not fit for the kingdom of heave.” From that day his face was turned toward the gospel ministry, with ten years of preparation before him. At another time, the Lord, in a direct answer to a special prayer, made known to him his call and promised blessing. Moreover, the Lord had all these years been preparing him for his future work. While yet a mere boy, he was trained in the use of tools, and assisted in the erection of a number of buildings. At the age of seventeen he was called upon to begin mission work among the poor whites in the mountains of Virginia in the vicinity of his summer home. In this work he was several times called upon to make extemporaneous addresses; a great strain upon him at the time, but the value of these experiences to his later work cannot be overestimated. At the same time he was compelled to keep a country store, and thus became acquainted with the keeping of books and finances. In 1881 his father was called to St. Paul, Minn., as general manager of the Northern Pacific railroad. In 1882, Rev. Haupt, then graduating from the University, paid his parents a visit at St. Paul. He was impressed with the great need of English Lutheran mission work, for as yet there was not a single English Lutheran Mission in the North West, Rev. Trabert not having started his work in Minneapolis until January of the following year. The following summer, 1883, Mr. Haupt, being a senior student in the seminary, came again to St. Paul, and spent the whole summer assisting Rev. Tabert to establish a mission in St. Paul. The influence of his father was a great aid in this undertaking, by which he was enabled to secure nearly $1900 in three months. The rest of the needed amount having been donated by friends in the east through Rev. G. H. Tabert. Rev. Haupt was installed as the English Lutheran minister to St. Paul, July 6, 1884, on a salary from the Mission Committee of $400, and $100 from the congregation. Had it not been that his parents kindly gave him his room and board, he never could have lived upon the sum in those days. Since that time until the present, (Jan. 1, 1891) he has built three churches, and saved the missions a considerable sum by drawing his own plans and personally supervising the work of building. Over $12,000 have been raised for the work in St. Paul, some $10,000 of which were raised through his persistent efforts. The three missions have received in all a total membership of 220 souls, and the Sunday schools some 500 scholars, the present membership being about 180 communicants and 250 scholars. To carry on and keep alive this work has required a great strain on the part of the missionary. He has been compelled to be his own janitor, organist, choir master, and preacher, and, at times, almost his own congregation. He has had to hold four and five services on Sundays, and, including catechetical classes, the same number during the week; has had a tedious drive of sixteen miles every Sunday afternoon during the winter in the severe cold with the thermometer twenty to thirty degrees below zero, and many times almost frozen stiff; or during the heat and dust of the dry summer months weary and worn. It may be interesting to the reader to know that the early days of this pastor were spent in the Episcopal Church, there being no English Lutheran church that the family could attend, but that a gracious Providence led him back into the noble faith of his fathers. Rev. Haupt was for many years the bosom friend of the Rev. Horace G.B. Artman, who died in the mission field of India.

    During his career, he used his technical know-how to draft architect's plans for six local churches and raised funds for their construction. From 1914 to 1928, he served as Protestant juvenile court officer in St. Paul. For the last three years of his life, Alexander was pastor of a church in Horicon, WI. He died there at the age of 73 on Sept. 29, 1934. co-officiating his funeral were Rev. Dr. R.H. Gerberding, Rev. Carl H. Bartsch and Rev. John Sander. Burial was in St. Paul's Oakland Cemetery, with an obituary appearing in the Minneapolis Star.

  • Granddaughter Ellen Haupt ( ? - ? ) died at the age of three. 
  • Granddaughter Henrietta Bennett Haupt (1821-1913) was born on April 6, 1821. On Dec. 6, 1848, she married Achille Lucien Archambault ( ? -1908), son of Joseph Oliver Victor Senez Archambault of Newtown, Bucks County. Achille's father is said to have been an aide to French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte and accompanied him to St. Helena, said the Philadelphia Inquirer, "and it was he who broke his sword over his knee and threw the pieces into the sea to prevent his British captors getting it." Five offspring born to the pair were Joseph Lucian Archambault, Thomas Jefferson Haupt Archambault, Charles Victor Archambault, Anna "Margaretta" Archambault and Achille Lucian Archambault. They grieved when their eldest son Joseph died in 1851 at the age of under two. Achille founded the Kensington Iron Works Company and Kensington Engine Works. He is widely credited with having invented the first portable engine in the United States and in designing the first steam yacht in action in American waters. When the couple marked their golden wedding anniversary in Dec. 1898, they held a reception at their home at 426 South 40th Street, with a notice published in the Inquirer. Among those helping in receiving guests were Isabel M. Harrison, Bessie Haupt, Florence Haupt and Susie Haupt. Guests included Mr. and Mrs. B.K. Jamison, Mr. and Mrs. Norton, Mrs. Ash Shaffer, Mrs. Lewis M. Haupt, Professor and Mrs. Jones, Mrs. Henry Heyl, Mr. and Mrs. E.S. Levy, Mrs. Barrett, Mrs. Harrison, Mrs. George Jenks and Mrs. Howard. The couple reached their golden wedding anniversary on Dec. 6, 1948. The celebration was short-lived, as Achille died 22 days later, on Dec. 28, 1908. His death created headlines in newspapers across the nation. Henrietta lived on for another five years. Burdened with hardening of the arteries, she passed away at the age of 92 on Sept. 16, 1913. Burial was in Woodlands Cemetery.

    Great-grandson Thomas Jefferson Haupt Archambault (1852-1941) was born on April 6, 1852. He did not marry or reproduce. He assisted his father in the operation of the Kensington Iron Works Company. Circa 1899-1900 he served as commissioner of the Nicaragua Canal and director of irrigation projects in Arizona. His final residence in the City of Brotherly Love was with his sister 426 South 40th Street. He died at the age of 89 at home in Philadelphia on April 14, 1941. An obituary in the Philadelphia Inquirer confirmed his father's relationship to Napoleon. Interment was in Woodlands Cemetery.

    Great-grandson Charles Victor Archambault Sr. (1854-1943) was born on March 11, 1854. In 1895, he married Julia Virginia Richardson (1873-1953). the ceremony was led by Rev. Thomas J. Kenny of the St. Mary's Star of the Sea Church, held in the home of the bride in Baltimore. Together, they produced a family of four -- Virginia Parrott (1896-1999), Winifred Border (1897-1976), Charles Victor Archambault, Jr. (1899-1973) and Thomas Julian Archambault (1901-1986) . He spent his career as a marine designer. The Archambaults dwelled in Baltimore in 1941. Charles died in Rhode Island at the age of 89 on Aug. 24, 1943. Burial was in Baltimore's New Cathedral Cemetery, following a requiem mass at St. William's Church, with an obituary appearing in the Baltimore Sun.

    Margaretta's 1924 book
    Courtesy Google Books

    Great-granddaughter Anna "Margaretta" Archambault (1856-1956) was born on Feb. 12, 1856 or 1857. She did not marry but devoted her life to her art. As a young woman, she attended Miss Anne Longstreth's School for Girls followed by the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. She went on to further study at the Académie Julian in Paris, working in the city of light for Gabrielle Debillemont-Chardon, a specialist in miniature painting. Circa 1898, back in Philadelphia, Margaretta served as secretary of the Pennsylvania Society of Miniature Painters in affiliation with the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She also was an accomplished water-colorist. The 2013 book North American Women Artists of the Twentieth Century, by Jules Heller, says that she exhibited her work at London's Royal Miniature Society and captured prizes in 1922 and 1925 at the Pennsylvania Society of Miniature Painters and in 1941 at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Circa 1941, shared a residence with her bachelor brother Thomas in Philadelphia. She also maintained a home in Upperville, VA. She was the author of the 1924 volume, A Guide Book of Art, Architecture and Historic Interests of Pennsylvania (John C. Winston Co.). In 1949, Margaretta donated a set of 23 photographs, some damaged and faded, to the Library of Congress depicting her brother's work in Nicaragua and Arizona in 1899-1900. The images show engineers and construction workers engaged in dredging for the Nicaragua canal commission, Nicaraguan street scenes and native quarters, as well as dredging on the Gila River, Arizona. During the last 10 years of her life, she suffered with hardening of the arteries. Death swept her away in Philadelphia's Home for Aged Women of Christ Church Hospital at the age of 99 or 100 on June 29, 1956. Burial was in Woodlands Cemetery.

    Great-grandson Achille Lucian Archambault (1866-1940) was born on Jan. 18, 1866. He was wed twice. His first marriage, on Oct. 8, 1890, to Mountain Lake Angel ( ? -1891) only lasted a little more than a year. She was spirited away by death on Nov. 8, 1891. On Feb. 1, 1895, he wed a second time to Margaret Chapman Angel ( ? - ? ). The second union resulted in five children, among them Achille Lucien Archambault III (1896-1974) who wed Louise Josephine Belcher (1897-1981). 

  • Dr. T.J. Haupt was sailing on the George Law when he drowned in 1856.    
    Courtesy Library of Congress

  • Grandson Dr. Thomas Jefferson Haupt (1823-1856) was born on the Fourth of July 1823 and apparently named for the author of the Declaration of Independence who was still living at the time. He was a medical doctor and practiced dentistry. Circa 1844-1845, at the age of 21, he was based in Philadelphia at 201 North Sixth Street, between Callowhill and Wood, and advertised daily in the local newspaper, the Philadelphia Public Ledger. By 1846, he had an office at 148 Lexington Street in Baltimore, MD, and was planning to travel to Gettysburg, where he brother Herman was residing, to provide dental services there. As of 1850-1851, his practice had moved to 308 Broadway, and he advertised in the New-York Daily Tribune that the "Dental operations performed at this office are characterised by elegance, permance and excellence of materials; charges barely remunerating and much below the usual rates. A visit from those whose limited incomes have heretofore prevented them from employing a competent Dentist is respectfully solicited." He is known in May 1856 to have sailed aboard the steamer  George Law, carrying U.S. postal mail and millions of dollars in gold, en route from San Francisco to New York via Aspinwall, Panama. Tragically, on May 13, 1856, at the age of 33, he drowned while on that trip, three days before the ship was to have arrived in New York. His body was not recovered, and no newspaper coverage or obituary have been found. His death may have been overshadowed by a far greater tragedy on that voyage, while docked in Panama, a week earlier, a number of George Law passengers boarded a Panama Railroad express train and were killed when the locomotive derailed at the Obispo Bridge, killing some 30 to 40 people, generating worldwide reportage. A cenotaph tablet was erected in Thomas' memory on his mother's grave in Philadelphia's Laurel Hill Cemetery.
Philadelphia: A History of the City and Its People, by Ellis Paxson Oberholtzer
Courtesy Internet Archive
  • Grandson Jacob "Lewis" Leeds Haupt (1826-1898) was born on April 20, 1826 in "old Philadelphia" and was said to have been of English, German and Huguenot bloodlines. He was a graduate of Boys' High School in the city and then became employed as a teacher at the Oak Ridge Seminary for girls in Gettysburg, PA. Not long afterward, said the Lancaster (PA) Semi-Weekly New Era, "during the presidency of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company of Mr. John Edgar Thompson, he was appointed the general passenger and ticket agent of the newly organized enterprise, with headquarters first at Harrisburg and afterwward at Philadelphia; and was well acquainted with all the workers, officers and conductors of the passenger department of the entire road, which he brought to a state of splendid efficiency. He was largely the originator and promoter of that great convenience to all modern travelers, the 'coupon' ticket, and was a conscientious, steady worker, traveling incessantly for the road. So important an officer was he to the system that when he was 'drafted' during the Rebellion, near the close of the fifteen years of his service, his fine was promptly paid by the railway in order to retain him at his post of duty, and secure the faithful transfer and forwarding of the troops, from the West and North, over this great system. The work over which he then presided has now become three great departments of the road. Mr. Haupt subsequently entered upon a mercantile life and was interested in the mining, shipping and delivery of coal. He was also President of the North American Life and Accident Insurance Company of Philadelphia." On April 1, 1885, he accepted a new position as superintendent of the Visitation Agency of the Glen Mills School or House of Refuge, located at the corner of Parrish and 23rd Streets in the city, and maintained that position for the balance of his years. Said the New Era, "And it it safe to say that the thousands of his 'boys' and 'girls' of this great charity were the better for having come into contact with his noble character and self-denying care." For decades, both in Philadelphia and Harrisburg, he was active in eldership and Sunday School roles and in time was named president and treasurer of the church council of St. Mark's Lutheran Church in the city of brotherly love. He also held posts as secretary of the Lutheran Orphans' Home at Mount Airy and helped to organize the city's Lutheran Theological Seminary, where he sat on its board from 1867 to 1885 during a time when the school produced five Lutheran pastors who went on to serve pulpits in Lancaster. The New Era said that  "Of a quiet, unassuming nature, he never sought or held public office, yet he ever lived for others and was a most self-denying, useful man. He was always ready when called upon to lend a helping hand. The entire ticket system of the great Sanitary Fair was under his supervision and management. Always at his post of duty, honorable, chaste, reliable, thorough in all he undertook, careful, but fixed in his convictions, a ready writer, with a rich vein of wit and a keen sense of humor, earnestly, deeply spiritual and morally devout, systematic, patient and persevering, the enemy of all that looked like tyranny, cant, or hypocrisy, he stood as the embodiment of a true Christian and American churchman and civilian... In person Mr. Haupt was small and of gentle winning manners." 

    In 1849, he wed Louisa Caroline Keller (July 30, 1828-1918), daughter of Rev. Dr. Benjamin Keller. (Lewis' brother Herman wed Louisa's sister Ann Cecilia.) Their family of five children included Rev. Charles "Elvin" Haupt, Henry Eugene Haupt, William Keller Haupt, Fanny Gertrude Haupt snd Mary Louise Conarroe. While on a visit to the home of his son Elvin in Lancaster, PA in late August/early September 1898, his health failed due to what a newspaper called "of a scirrhous nature." He passed away at the age of 72 on Sept. 17, 1898. The Semi-Weekly New Era reported that "As midnight approached on saturday last the spirit of Mr. Lewis L. Haupt passed from its earthly state and found peace." The remains were brought back to Philadelphia for funeral rites at the family home at 1724 Park Avenue. Delivering the funeral oration was Rev. J.L. Sibole, assisted by Rev. Ashmead Schaffer. Pallbearers were Richard A. Leweis, Amos Bonsall, W.W. Kurtz and Benjamin N. Faires. The remains were interred in Laurel Hill Cemetery. Louisa outlived her spouse by two decades. Toward the end she became senile and developed heart disease. She remained in Philadelphia at 1724 North Park Avenue and died there at the age of 90 on Sept. 30, 1918. An obituary in the Lancaster (PA) Intelligencer said she "was a most active Christian woman in her day and was well known here." Burial was in Laurel Hill Cemetery.

    Great-grandson Rev. Dr. Charles "Elvin" Haupt (1852-1920) was born on Oct. 6, 1852 in Harrisburg, Dauphin County, PA. He grew up in Philadelphia, graduated from its public school system and attended a private academy. In 1868, at the age of 16, he enrolled in the University of Pennsylvania and graduated with a classical degree in 1872. Elvin made the decision to enter Christian ministry and graduated in 1875 from the Lutheran Theological Seminary on Franklin Square. On Jan. 15, 1878, he wed Mary Martha Geissinger (Sept. 22, 1846-1920), daughter of John Geissinger of Huntingdon County. The couple's duo of known children were Charles Elvin Haupt Jr. and Gerald Lewis Haupt. They quickly established their permanent residence in Lancaster, PA, where he launched his career at Christ Lutheran Church, at that time a mission of Old Trinity, as an assistant under Rev. Dr. Greenwald. For many years he was a principal at Franklin and Marshall College and a professor of mental and moral philosophy. He and his cousins Rev. Alexander James Derbyshire Haupt and Rev. Lewis Muhlenberg Haupt were  profiled in Rev. J.C. Jensson's book American Lutheran Biographies (Milwaukee, 1890).

    Since he entered on his residence in Lancaster, Pa., Sept. 1, 1875, as Dr. Greenwald's assistant, the Rev. Charles Elvin Haupt has seemed a vital part of Lancaster and its Lutheranism... His youth was spent in Philadelphia. After graduation at the University of Pennsylvania of that city and the Philadelphia Theological Seminary, he was ordained by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania at Norristown, May 26, 1875. His duties as assistant to Dr. Greenwald lay especially in that portion of Holy Trinity parish where Christ Church had been erected. He was a man exactly to the Doctor's mind – in many things a copy of the mild, engaging old pastor, and has since succeeded to his local popularity among people of every rank, notably among the poor and distressed. In January, 1880, he became pastor of Grace Church, in the northern part of the city. Fruits of his work there are a small parish school, quite a rarity in English churches, and the Greenwald memorial mission, called "The Evangelical Lutheran Sunday School of Emmanuel.” He is the author of "Stories from Bible History," and a biography of Rev. Dr. Greenwald. His skill in music and drawing, and his acquaintance with most of the natural sciences, added to a ready flow of genial humor and an abundant store of apt anecdotes and illustrations, make him a valuable adjunct at Sunday School institutes and wherever children or youth are to be interested in the affairs of God's Kingdom.

    He also was known as a witty user of puns to make others laugh. He also was a workaholic. The Lancaster Examiner once said that "For many years he persistently refused to take a vacation, until several years ago, he was sent on a Western strip to the Pacific coast, and he returned greatly refreshed. Whenever the subject of vacation was broached, he emphatically declared that the church must be kept open." Elvin was named in 1880 as the second pastor of Lancaster's Grace Lutheran Church and held that post for four decades to the end of his life. All told,he performed 3,500 weddings and more than 4,000 funerals. He received a doctoral degree in 1900 from Franklin and Marshall. During his pastorship at Grace, when a new building was constructed in 1908, a "singing tower" of a 15-bell chime was installed and still functioning as of 2000. During the 1908 construction era, the members worshipped at the Temple Shaarai Shomayim on the same block, having always had a cordial relationship, including a "joint Thanksgiving service at the temple for which some of Haupt's colleagues roundly criticized him," said the Intelligencer Journal. He was a founder of Lancaster General Hospital and Madame Cotta College, later reorganized into the Shippen School for girls and renamed the Lancaster Country Day School. The Intelligencer Journal said that the Lemon Street Public School, later the Lancaster General Hospital School of Nursing, ws renamed the Haupt School and stayed that way until the 1990s. At the death of his mother in 1918, in Philadelphia, he traveled to attend the rites and had to forego leading his usual midweek services. His address in 1920 was 21 East James Street in Lancaster, a residence known as "Grace Place." Suffering from chronic heart disease and acute kidney failure, death swept him away just eight days after his 68th birthday on Oct. 14, 1920. Charles E. Haupt Jr. of Washington, DC signed the official state death certificate. Burial was in Woodward Hill, also known today as Greenwood Cemetery. The city is said to have paid for a prominent marker at his grave. Inscribed on its face is this epitaph: "A fervent preacher of God, a loving disciple of Jesus Christ, a faithful servant of his fellow-men, came not to be ministered unto but to minister." Today, the carved letter "H" is in his honor remains in a rectangular stone as part of an old three "carriage-steps" platform in front of the church parsonage at 21 East James Street, Lancaster. Their son Gerald died at the age of six, and their son Charles moved to Washington, DC where he was an architect.

    Great-grandson Henry Eugene Haupt (1855-1925) was born on June 30, 1855. On April 15, 1880, he wed his cousin, Mary Ella Witte (1849-1921), daughter of William H. and Mary Ann (Haupt) Witte of Bucks County. The couple did not reproduce. Circa 1898, when named in his father's newspaper obituary, he worked as a scales manufacturer. Their address in the early 1920s was 225 South 40th Street. Sadly, Mary Ella died at home on March 25, 1921. An obituary in the Philadelphia Inquirer said she was "well known in musical circles in this city... [She] was an alumna of the Moravian Seminary at Bethlehem, a charter member of the Philadelphia Choral Society, the Philadellphia Music Club, associate member of the Fortnightly Club and connected with other musical interests here." Her funeral rites, conducted in the residence, were presided by Rev. J. Henry Harms, of the Lutheran Church of the Holy Communion. The widowed Henry then went to live at 4521 Spruce Street. On March 22, 1925, at the age of 69, he died from the effects of pulmonary tuberculosis. The body was laid to rest in Laurel Hill Cemetery. No obituary has been found in the Philadelphia Inquirer.

    Great-grandson William Keller Haupt (1857-1939) was born on Oct. 11, 1857. He was married three times during his lifetime and is not known to have reproduced. His first marriage was with Rachel Sweetman ( ? -1904). William was employed in the bankfield field for more than 50 years. In 1887, he joined the employ of the Union National Bank. By 1898, he had moved to the Fourth Street National Bank, remaining until 1900. He then was tapped to be vice president of Colonial Trust Company. He became a partner in Altemus and Haupt, brokers. For five years, reported the Philadelphia Inquirer, he was the Philadelphia representative of the commercial paper brokerage firm of Lahey, Fargo and Company of New York. He also was "widely known as a singer" and performed solos as a tenor at the North Broad Street Presbyterian Church and the First Unitarian Church. William held memberships in the vaunted Union League, Bachelors Barge Club, Orpheus Club, Symphony Society, Melody Club and Matrinee Musical Society. He also served a term as treasurer of the Geographical Society of Philadelphia. H Sadly, Rachel died on Dec. 7, 1904. His second sposue was Sarah Lombaert (1857-1921). He is known to have signed his mother's death certificate in 1918 and at the time lived at 119 South Fourth Street. Then on June 19, 1922, he tied the marital knot with Anna (Thompson) Wood (1886-1957). The couple shared a home at 2112 Spruce Street. In November 1937, William was stricken by a severe cerebral hemorrhage but did not die. He lingered for about 16 months. During that time, at Christmas 1937, some 37 members of his Orpheus Club came to his home to serenade him with holiday carols. Said the Inquirer, "The affair attracted so much attention the police roped off the space in front of the Haupt home and the Orpheus then delighted the neighborhood with an outdoor concert. Mr. Haupt became a membere of this top-ranking Philadelphia singing club about 50 years ago." Death mercifully carried him away at the age of 81 on Feb. 21, 1939. He succumbed to the spectre of death in Philadelphia on Feb. 21, 1939. The remains were interred in Laurel Hill Cemetery.

    Great-granddaughter Fanny Gertrude Haupt (1862-1947) was born on June 20, 1862. She did not marry over her long life. In the 1940s, she dwelled at 270 West Walnut Lane in Philadelphia. As her health declined she was admitted to resided in the Conner Convalescent Home. Diagnosed with cancer of the lung and a leasion on the right breast, which spread, she surrendered to the angel of death on April 24, 1947. Her mortal remains were lowered under the sod of Laurel Hill Cemetery in Philadelphia.

    Great-granddaughter Mary Louise Haupt (1864-1906) was born on Jan, 24, 1864 or 1865. At the age of 28, on Oct. 19, 1892, she wed Richard Riley Conarroe (1863-1930), also commonly spelled "Connaroe" and "Conarrol," the son of John L. and Margaret (Hamm) Conarroe. Their nuptials were held in St. Luke's Evangelical Church in Philadelphia, officiated by Mary Louise's brother Rev. C. Elvin Haupt, assisted by Rev. J. Luther Sibole. In announcing the marriage, the Philadelphia Inquirer said that the "bride was attired in white crepe de chene, en train, trimmed with embroidered chiffon. She wore diamond ornaments, a tuile veil, with orange blossoms and white kid gloves and bore a bouquet of bridal roses." Afterward, the wedding banquet was held at the home of her parents at 1724 Park Avenue. Six children were produced by this union -- Elvin Hamm Conarroe (1896-1953), Richard Riley Conarroe Jr., Margaret Louise Conarroe (1893-1966) and triplets Louis Conarroe, John Conarroe and Elizabeth Conarroe. The Conarroes lived in Philadelphia where Richard earned a living as a hardware store merchant. He is known to have become a partner of the hardware firm James M. Vance & Co. in January 1902 along with H. Vance Peters and Edmund L. Wunder. Their homeplace was at the address of 2033 North 22nd Street. Tragically, while expecting a baby in late 1905, Mary Louise developed kidney problems which plagued her for the remaining six months of her existence. Then, after giving birth to not one baby but three, in mid-March 1906, her health plummeted. A week after birth, death spirited her away at the age of 41 years, two months and two days on March 26, 1906. Adding to the family's overwhelming grief, one of the triplets, Elizabeth, was stillborn. Funeral services were held in the family home, with burial for Mary Louise taking place in South Laurel Hill Cemetery and baby Elizabeth in the Odd Fellows Cemetery. A very brief notice of her death was printed in the Philadelphia Inquirer. The widowed Richard outlived his bride by nearly a quarter of a century. He wed a second time circa 1907 to Pansy D. Ottwell (1884-1946), daughter of Mary Ottwell. His final employer was Charles M. Ghriskey's Sons. Their home in 1930 was the Chelton Arms Apartments in Germantown. He passed away in Germantown Hospital at the age of 66 on Feb. 2, 1930. An obituary appeared in the Inquirer. Daughter Margaret Louise did not marry. She lived in Bryn Mawr, PA where she was employed as an executive secretary, and died from colon cancer on April 7, 1966.

  • Granddaughter Mary Elizabeth Haupt (1828-1867) was born on Aug. 3, 1828. She never married but devoted her life to her career. The Philadelphia Evening Telegraph said she was "One of the first teachers in the Girls' High and Normal School, when that institution was reorganized on its present basis, [and] was placed in charge of the department of Mental and Moral Philosophy. As a teacher she had few equals and no superiors, and in the latter branch exemplified her teachings by her daily walk and conversation." Circa 1866, she dwelled at 2029 Green Street, Philadelphia. When in her 30s, she left the high school to join Mary E. Tazewell as principals of the West Penn Square Seminary for Young Ladies at 5 South Merrick Street, on West Penn Square below Market. The Evening Telegraph said the seminar "bid fair to become one of the best and most popular of its character in the city." They are known to have placed advertising in the Philadelphia Inquirer in 1866 and 1867 announcing when the next terms would begin and instructing parents on deadlines for applications. Mary also was a member of St. Philip's Protestant Episcopal Church. In July 1867, she and Mary, in company with Josiah W. Harmer, Mr. and Mrs. Clark and Rev. Robert G. Chase and his wife, took a holiday to the coast of Maine. At the time, Chase was rector of St. Matthias Episcopal Church of Philadelphia, while Harmer was an up-and-coming lawyer and Clark was the cashier of the Framingham National Bank of Massachusetts. On the tragic day of July 24, 1867, while yachting together in Bar Harbor near Mount Desert, all but one in their immediate party drowned when their vessel capsized in a sudden burst of wind. The Philadelphia Evening Telegraph said that on the day of the outing: 

    They were a pleasant and happy company, and were enjoying themselves to the utmost. The last words spoken were by Mr. Chase, who stood upon the mast, "On, this is glorious." In a moment the squall struck them, and they were buried in the ocean depths. Verily, "in the midst of life we are in death." Those who were in the other boat saw the disaster with feelings that can better be imagined than described, but they were two miles and more to leeward, and could in no way reach the spot. Miss Blake, of Framingham, who was rescued, has recovered, but is still here. Her life was saved by an oar which she clutched, and by which she was buoyed up till help could reach her. Other bodies were seen floating on or just below the surface, but it was impossible to reach them. The boat went down stern foremost, dragging the smaller boat in tow with her, and disappeared almost instantly. The most strenuous efforts have since bee nmade to recover the bodies, but without success. The water is forty or fifty fathoms deep, and the current is very strong. It is hardly probable they will ever be recovered till the sea shall be compelled to give up its dead.

    A special report to the Portland Daily Press in Maine gave more details --

    A party came in from Southwest Harbor about half past eleven in the sail boat Telegraph, owned by Mr. Freeman of Southwest Harbor, and piloted by one Robinson...  They remained about an hour and put out again with another boar that had accompanied them, in charge of Mr. John Freeman. Two other boats started out soon after, one in charge of a Capt. Higgins, and the yacht Maggie Mitchell. We were badly baffled by flaws in getting out of the harbor. The Telegraph and her companion boat, however, were getting on well. All the boats were separated by the distance of a mile or more. When the Telegraph was about four miles out squalls began to strike us. The Telegraph was seen to careen, but then righted again, partially, at least. Another squall, and she was seen to go over, and in three or four minutes she went down. Capt. Higgins, who was nearest and had the best course, reached the spot first. It may have been 15 or 20 minutes. Four persons were seen floating upon the surface. Not a trace of the boat was seen. She had gone down so rapidly that no on seems to have had time to loose and launch the small boat, the and pilot had gone with her.

    In its own analysis of the accident, the Philadelphia Inquirer observed that the:

    ...sad catastrophe... continues to be the subject of much comment and regret... These ladies were the companions of Mr. and Mrs. Chase upon their summer excursion. Miss Houpt was a sister of Lewis L. Houpt, Esq., the former General Ticket Agent of the Pennsylvania Railroad and at the present time President of the North American Accidental Insurance Company. He will feel the blow sadly... This calamity should be a warning to that class of careless persons who, forgetting or not realizing their ignorance and inexperience in such matters, will bathe, boat and sail in the most reckless manner. Accidents of this kind frequently occur, and though for a time they have some slight influence in checking the method of seeking dangerous pleasure. the caution is soon forgotten. A disaster, however, as severe as this, and one which has caused a deep gloom to settle not only on the immediate friends of the unfortunates, but also on many others, cannot fail to produce a full and good effect. 

The news was published as far away as Pittsburgh, PA and Lawrence, KS. A cenotaph in Mary Elizabeth's memory was placed in Philadelphia's Laurel Hill Cemetery on the same marker as a similar tablet for her brother Thomas Jefferson Houpt, lost at sea in 1856, and their mother. The operation of the school continued under the leadership of Mary S. Mitchell and Renee N. Townsend. Agnes Irwin became its head in 1869 and changed its name to the Agnes Irwin School, and then in 1875 moved it to her home at the southeast corner of Spruce and 19th Streets. In October 1898 -- 30-plus years after the tragedy -- a tablet to the memory of the two Marys was on exhibition at the Thackera & Co. on Chestnut Street during Jubilee Week.

  • Step-grandson Charles Jacob Haupt (1810-1851) was born on March 17, 1810. On his 24th birthday in 1834, he tied the marital knot with Emily Mestayer ( ? - ? ), daughter of Lewis and Maria Mestayer of Boston. Their family of offspring included Emily Marie Haupt, Rosalie Haupt, Charles Henry Haupt and William Ayres Haupt. The family was shrouded in grief when daughters Emily died at age two and Rosalie at age one. Charles died on May 8, 1851. 

    Great-grandson Dr. Charles Henry Haupt (1839-1894) was born on March 30, 1839. He planted himself in St. Paul, MN where he practiced as a physician. Death carried him away in 1894.

    Great-grandson William Ayres Haupt (1844-1896) -- stage name "William Mestayer" -- was born on June 8, 1844. He was twice-wed, first to Ida Riddle ( ? - ? ). His second marriage was with Theresa Rose Ott ( ? - ? ), stage name "Theresa Vaughn." They both were stage actors. 

   
Richmond, VA articles about piracy of Abraham Piesch's fleet, 1811
Courtesy Library of Congress

Daughter Sarah Haupt (1778- ? ) was born on Nov. 12, 1778. She was joined in wedlock with Abraham Piesch ( ? - ? ). The pair did not reproduce. He was a well-known ship owner and East India shipping merchant in Philadelphia, said to have been in business with his wife's brothers Samuel, Jacob, Sebastian and Henry. He also was a board director of the Marine and Fire Insurance Company of Aurora, IL. A typed, manuscrpt history of the family by Rev. William H. Haupt of Chariton, Iowa said that "During the Napoleonic wars their vessels were seized and formed part of the French spoilation claims. In 1812 the British seized the remaining 15 ships just out near Philadelphia, and this finished the operations of the company. The French settled their claims and as Piesch was on his way east, he was taken ill and died at Wheeling W. Va. and the papers lost." One of the ships was the Rose, commanded by Capt. Hidelias, carrying 500 tons of tobacco and hides to Stockholm, Sweden, when captured by a British brig of war, while yet within the capes of Delaware in August 1811. Another vessel, the Dolphin, under Capt. Brown, en route to New Orleans, was captured by the British sloop of war Atalanta and sailed to Halifax on the charge of transporting French goods, when in fact the only such objects to be found were 25 casks of French wine.  Sarah is believed to have died in Vandalia, IL.

Slaves picking cotton in Alabama, 1860 - Library of Congress

Son Sebastian Haupt II (1781-1835), also spelled "Sebastin" and "Houph," was born on May 17, 1781 in Philadelphia. One account calls him the "son of a rich ship-owner." Sebastian migrated to Alabama in young manhood. On Aug. 23 or 26, 1817, in Clarke County, AL, he entered into marriage with Matilda Brewster (Sept. 20, 1794-1880), a native of Georgia. Their nuptials were conducted by justice of the peace William Cochran. They became the parents of seven known children, among them Eliza Haupt (died in 1819 at age one), Lewis Houpt, Nancy "Anna" McDowell, William Walton Haupt, Stephen Adams Haupt, Sebastiana M. Houpt and an unnamed infant son who died in 1835. In the 1830 federal census enumeration of Greene County, AL, there are 22 people shown in the household, including 15 slaves. From there, the family may have relocated for a time to Texas but returned to Alabama. Sebastian is named in the book Historic Families of Alabama, which stated that he was "for many years a prosperous coffee planter in the Island of Trinidad, and on returning to this country, avoided the rigors of the northern winters by settling upon large traces of rich land which had bought in Greene and Sumpter counties, Alabama." A profile of their son in William Leslie Black's book A New Industry, Or Raising the Angora Goat, and Mohair, for Profit, states that in 1833, Sebastian bought largely of lands on the Bigbee river from the Choctaw Indians, upon which he settled." The New Industry also states that Sebastian "was of an inventive turn of mind, and had the honor of digging the first artesian well ever sunk in the United States."

Another of their residences in the early 1830s was in McDowell, Sumter County, near Belmont and across the river from Demopolis, Marengo County. The tract was comprised of 126.25 acres, called "Stephens Bluff," at the legal description Fraction Section 27, Southeast Quarter Township, Range 2 East. With his health in decline, Sebastian wrote his last will on Sept. 30, 1835. Sadly, he died three days later on Oct. 3, 1835 near Demopolis, AL. Interment was in a small burying ground west of Demopolis today known as the "Houpt" Cemetery, containing less than two dozen graves. Under the terms of the will, he appointed John W. Smith and James Bruster as his executors. He explicitly requested that "my slave Spencer be sold in Mobile to settle my debts -- and after the debts is all settled I wish to bequeath to my Brother Abraham the sum of one thousand Dollars to him and to his heirs..." The balance of his assets were to be distributed among his lawful heirs. The widowed Matilda outlived her husband by 35 years. The New Industry book says that she "was a woman of remarkable energy, and practical sense, as has been clearly demonstrated by the manner in which she reared her son [William Walton], who was only five years of age at the time of his father's death." She wed again to Merrit Hodgins (1796-1868). Matilda was rendered a widow for a second time when Merrit died on Nov. 22, 1868, with burial in the Houpt Cemetery. Death swept her away at the age of 85, in McDowell on July 19, 1880. Her remains sleep in the sacred soil of Houpt Cemetery. A nearby burying ground on the property, called the "Palestine Cemetery," apparently connected with the Palestine Baptist Church, known to have been a Black congregation, may hold the remains of their slaves. A Haupt descendant, Mrs. Monroe Adams, living in Statesville, NC, once wrote to the Alabama State Department of Archives in Montgomery, seeking information about Sebastian so that she could qualify for membership in the Daughters of the American Revolution.

Site of the Houpt plantation and family cemetery at McDowell, AL and nearby "Palestine Cemetery" which may hold the dust of their slaves.  U.S. Geological Survey - Below: Demopolis as of 2010. Library of Congress
  
  • Col. William Walton Haupt
    Courtesy Google Books
    Grandson Col. William Walton "W.W." Haupt (1828-1907) was born on Feb. 10, 1828 or Jan. 1830 in Greene County, AL, although some in his family thought him Pennsylvania-born. His birthplace was at the forks of the Bigbee and Warrior rivers. He was only about seven years of age when his father died. He attended grade school in Demopolis, near their home at McDowell. He then went on to spend two years at Centenary College in Mississippi and two years at  what became Washington and Lee College in Virginia. While in Virginia, he led drilling for a Cincinnati company of cadets on the grounds of the Virginia Military Institute. At the age of about 20, circa 1848, William relocated to Texas and farmed cotton west of the town of Bastrop, on the bend of the Colorado River. He was twice-wed. His first bride, whom he married on March 25, 1851, was Alexine H. Colgin ( ? - ? ). Their wedding was conducted by justice of the peace Ben J.H. Gaines back in Sumter County, AL. Sadly, the marriage ended with Alexine's death a short time later. On May 22, 1855, in the bride's hometown of Matagorda, Matagorda County, TX, he was united in matrimony with first wife's cousin, Sarah Ann Rugeley (Feb. 1, 1836 or May 1840- ? ), also an Alabama native and the daughter of John and Eliza Clopton (Colgin) Rugeley. Together, they bore a brood of offspring, several named for Confederate Army commanders -- Sebastian Haupt, Sebastiana Matilda "Bassie" Haupt, Leila Haupt, Alice B. Haupt, General "Beauregard" Haupt, Lewis McDowell Haupt Sr., Louise Haupt and Ouay Touay Haupt. As of 1856, the Haupts dwelled in Bastrop County. Then after William visited Hays County, TX and became "infatuated" with the possibility of introducing angora goats to the region, they moved in December 1857 to Kyle, TX. He is said to have purchased eight of the goats and cross-bred whem with the shorthaired Spanish goat. For this innovation, he has been cited in Arda Talbor Allen's Twenty-one Sons for Texas , the Portable Handbook of Texas and the Southwestern Historical Quarterly (1987). Paul H. Carlson's 1982 book Texas Woollybacks credits William with running "the first steam cotton gin used in his area." A lengthy profile in William Leslie Black's book A New Industry, Or Raising the Angora Goat, and Mohair, for Profit, states that after the move to Kyle, William also "constructed with a steam whistle and a pipe from the boiler to the pick-room, to extinguish fire, and discharged the exhaust pipe into the chimney as a spark arrester, all of which was his own construction." The New Industry book says that William:

    ...was never fond of a city life, and boasts of the fact that he “never lived a day in town in his life.” His preference was for a farm life, where he could surround himself with all the comforts of a home, and indulge his fancy for various kinds of live stock, of which he was especially fond. He introduced the first Essex hogs, and Brahma cattle, into Western Texas, and has invented many appliances for economy in farm work. He has always been a regular subscriber to agricultural papers, and has contributed many valuable articles upon various subjects relating to live stock and farming.

    A New Industry, Or Raising the Angora Goat, and Mohair, for Profit
    Courtesy Google Books

    When the federal census enumerations were made in 1860, 1870 and 1800, they made a home on a farm plantation in Hays, Hays County, TX. The slave schedule of the 1860 census shows that William owned nine slaves, four males and five females, ranging in age from 20 to 60. William is known to have been appointed postmaster of the town of Mountain City, Hays County, effective Oct. 24, 1860. He also was an inventor and on Oct. 17, 1871 received a patent for a new type of chair. In his claim, he said that "This invention relates to that class of chairs in which the back, seat, foot-rest, and head-rest are all self-adjusting, and operated by the natural movements of the occupant, who is enabled to occupy a position erect, horizontal, or at any desired inclination between the two." As of the early 1880s, he owned a herd of 600 heads. William wrote a lengthy summary of his operations that was published in John Lord Hayes' 1882 book, The Angora Goat; Its Origin, Culture, and Products:

    In breeding the pure Angora on the smooth-haired Mexican goat, the fleece in the offspring appears for the first time. Therefore, the fleece of the offspring is not affected by atavism. A grade billy will breed as well as a pure blood in proportion to his grade. The fibre in any grade being as fine or finer, at least here, as in the pure-blood, successive crosses are needed only to raise the grade and lengthen the fibre. This, however, is only my own idea. Whilst I set down as a rule that each cross, from the first up, adds a half pound to the fleece, yet I do not value any fleece much that falls below the fifth cross on account of kemp, though it is equally valuable in making saddle girths, for which it is more suitable than hair or buffalofur, moss, or any other material, being soft, strong, and durable. All my mohair has heretofore been worked up in Austin in that way. If factories were established for that purpose, they would consume all the mohair in the country for the next ten or fifteen years.

    Above: angora goats of the type that William raised. Below: William's narrative in the book The Angora Goat. Courtesy Google Books

    William also authored an article in an 1884 edition of Texas Stockman and Farmer, entitled "The Angora Goat." It appears that he was in connection with his first cousin, Col. Herman Haupt, a Union Army hero of the Civil War, who became interested in angora sheep-raising. Herman and perhaps others obtained a "liberal" charter from Virginia, known as the "Virginia Angora Company," which received a mountainous 160-square-mile tract with the intent of breeding 800 thoroughbred Angoras from California, and 20,000 Mexican and Maltese goats. The enterprise was abandoned with the Angoras could not be obtained. The New Industry profile said that in 1895, William:

    ...concluded to turn his attention to horticultural farming, and was forced to dispense with his goats, for which he had formed a very strong attachment. He, at first, thought of retaining an interest in them, but finally decided to sell them out and out, and Mr. W. G. Hughes, of Hastings, Kendall County, became the fortunate owner, and is still continuing to breed them. True to his nature, Col. Haupt established his garden upon the most approved plan, and now has under the most skillful cultivation thirty acres, which is said to be the most magnificent sight, in the shape of a garden, that has ever been seen in the State of Texas. He has several thousand fruit trees, consisting mostly of plums, which have proved to be most profitable, and a large amount in grapes, which are likewise very productive. But the main product is the dewberry and blackberry, of which he has fifteen acres, which supports a small army of women and children during the "berry time." Depending upon the elements for water, in West Texas, has always resulted in failure, and Col. Haupt has provided against all contingencies in this respect, by the means of a powerful windmill, and a tank, covering one acre of ground, in the center of his garden, from which he can irrigate his land at will. He is now contemplating the purchase of a gasoline engine, to be used in the event of necessity, which, however. occurs only for a short time, in the hot months of July and August...

    His magnificent estate consists of 3000 acres of beautiful land, 2500 of which is a pasture, on which three hundred improved cattle are run, and the remainder, between 400 and 500 acres, in farm and garden. Col. Haupt has a peculiarity of always imagining he is "hard up," and, with a man of his activity, it is not likely he would keep much loose cash around his house, yet he is recognized by all who know him as being as nicely situated in the comforts that this world can supply as anyone could wish to be, and his ranch is the envy of all who have had the pleasure of visiting it. He enjoys the good will of his neighbors, and is always glad to entertain his friends. He visits town about once a month, but rarely takes a seat, and is back at his ranch in a very few hours. At the advanced age of seventy-two, he is as active in mind and body, as a man of forty, and bids fair to live a considerable time, which is, doubtless, explained by the even tenor of his life. 

    As of 1900, census records show William earning a living as a farmer and gardener. Toward the end, he began to write a will dividing his ranch acreage equally among his children, except for his mentally ill daughter Alice Landers, who was estranged from her husband and living under her parents' roof. But he did not complete or sign the will, nor have it witnessed. Sadly, he died in Mountain City on Aug. 26 or 27, 1907. His remains were laid to rest in the Kyle Cemetery, On the face of his tall grave marker is the scripture from Jesus' Beatitudes, "Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God."  Their son Lewis, although not named as estate executor, but with the tacit blessing of his siblings, took charge of the estate, including his property, pasture lands and private papers, and used the income for their widowed mother's support. Sarah Ann outlived her spouse by five years. Death claimed her on Sept. 1 or 8, 1912. After Sarah's death, son Lewis distributed the farm proceeds with his brothers and sisters, except for their sister Alice Landers, who was considered "insane" and estranged from her husband, and had made a home with her parents. He also sold an undesignated 125-acre tract and used the money to send his sister to a sanitarium in San Antonio. Lewis did not admit his father's will for probate for about seven years, and under the law, it was barred under a statue of limitations. It all became a mess of what the purported will could dictate, what Alice was owed, and then when a man named Michaelis tried to buy Alice's interest, it went to court. The resulting case, Michaelis v. Nance et. al., No. 5590, was heard in the Court of Civil Appeals of Texas at Austin on March 2, 1916. Going on the witness stand to give testimony were son-in-laws W.H. Barbee and J.M. Nance, sons G.B. Haupt and Lewis Haupt, and daughter Touay Barbee, with their words included in the printed summary. 

    William Walton Haupt's chair patent - Courtesy Google Books

    Great-grandson Sebastian Haupt (1856- ? ) was born in 1856. His life story seems to be lost to history.

    Great-granddaughter Sebastiana Matilda "Bassie" Haupt (1857-1938) was born on Jan. 19, 1857 in Bastrop County, TX. She relocated to Kyle, Hays County, TX with her parents when she was about a year old and stayed for the balance of her many years. At the age of 20, in Oct.  1877, she was united in matrimony with Jeremiah Milton "J.M." Nance (April 6, 1850-1926). The 11 children they bore together were Haskel Joe Nance, Elmo Pate Nance, Albert Pate Nance, Lola Bunberry Armstrong, Jeremiah Milton Nance Jr., Flora Lee Howell, Stella Nance, Sally Barbee Smith, Winnie Tolbert, Mattie Parke Marcelline and Joseph Haupt Nance. When J.M. read his father-in-law's will on March 20, 1914, and saw that had not been witnessed, he took it to a lawyer in San Marcos and was told it was valid. The question of whether it could be admitted to probate, and its terms ironclad, became the noted court case Michaelis v. Nance et. al., No. 5590, heard in the Court of Civil Appeals of Texas at Austin on March 2, 1916. The Nances' home at one time was in San Marcos and later two miles east of Kyle. J.M. passed away in a San Antonio hospital on Sept. 16, 1926, bringing to a close their union of nearly 50 years. Leading his funeral rites was Methodist Church pastor Rev. J.E. Morgan. Bassie died at the age of 81 on April 14, 1938. Funeral rites were jointly conducted by Rev. J.E. Morgan, Rev. E.N. Sullivan and Rev. A.L. Miller. Burial was in Kyle Cemetery. An obituary in the Austin American said she was "one of the oldest Central Texas pioneers" and was survived by 16 grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

    Great-granddaughter Leila Haupt (1858-1924) was born on March 6, 1858 in Bastrop County, TX. She first was joined in wedlock with widower James Wylie "J.W." Williamson (July 26, 1847-1886). His first wife Mary E. (Landers) Williamson had died in 1883, and he brought these stepchildren into the second union -- James Allan Williamson, Grace E. Williamson Miller and Richard Andrew Williamson. Sadly, James died the year of their marriage, on Nov. 18, 1886, even as Leila was expecting their firstborn. Burial was in Richland Cemetery in Brinker, Hopkins County, TX. In 1887, she gave birth to Annie Wiley Blumrich Bowers. Later, she entered into matrimony with (?) Cooper ( ? - ? ). She was twice-widowed by 1916. The angel of death cleaved her away at the age of 66 on March 7, 1924. Interment of the remains was in Lockhart Municipal Burial Park in Caldwell County, TX.

    Great-granddaughter Alice B. Haupt (1859-1937) was born on June 16, 1859 or 1863 in Hays County, TX. On May 8, 1883, at the age of 24, she wed Col. Andrew Pike "A.P." Landers (March 4, 1843-1920), son of John C. and Jane (Goodman) Landers of Batesville, AR. The wedding was held in the local Baptist Church in Kyle, presided by Rev. W.E. Hall. In announcing the happy event, the Austin American-Statesman reported that "The ceremony was witnessed by a large number of friends, many of whom were from Austin. There were a large number of costly and handsome presents. The young couple are at the Raymond house, and will leave for Sulphur Springs, their future home, on the International this morning." At the time of marriage, Andrew was employed as Hopkins County Clerk. He is known to have served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War as a member of the 32nd Texas Cavalry, Company D. They made a home in Sulphur Springs, Hopkins County, TX. Andrew was active in public affairs and in 1889 served on a committee of the North Texas District Alliance to establish a woolen mill in town. He was quoted in the Abilene Reporter in August 1890, saying that "In 1889, the women of Hopkins county used $10,000 worth of snuff; the men used $36,000 worth of tobacco, and the people generally paid $75,000, and for flour $100,000. The first two items are luxuries and could, in time of depression, be dispensed with. In regard to bacon and flour, there is no reason why Hopkisn county should not raise a surplus of both. I do not know the amount paid for whisky, but it is enormous. We are improving, however, Last year there were 2,000 chattel mortages filed in my office, against only 300 this year. Ir the crops come up to the present prospects, Hopkins county will be wonderfully prosperous this year." Tragically, by 1907, Alice had become "insane." Estranged and divorced from her husband, she moved back home and lived with her parents in Mountain City. During that time, Andrew and the two sons remained in their residence at Sulphur Springs. Because she had lived with her parents, and then after their deaths, her brother refused to provide her with her share of the estate assets. Alice's siblings did agree to sell an undesignated 125-acre parcel and use the funds to send her to a sanitarium in San Antonio. In time, the matter went to court. Andrew died in Sulphur Springs of heart disease on April 17, 1920. Burial was in Richland Cemetery in Brinker, Hopkins County. Her home in the 1930s was with W.H. Landers in Dallas, TX, at the address of 2536 South Ervay Street. She lapsed into a coma of unknown origin and died at the age of 74 on Sept. 9, 1937. Burial was in Sulphur Springs, TX. 

    Great-grandson General "Beauregard" Haupt (1861-1927) -- known as "G.B." for short -- was born on Jan. 21, 1861 in Mountain City near Kyle, Hays County, TX. He appears to have been named for General Pierre Gustave Toutant-Beauregard, onetime superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point who later commanded the Confederate Army during the Civil War. In 1890, G.B. tied the marital knot with Mary Lorine Thompson (1869-1945). Their family of children included Addie Mavis Groos, Anna Laura Sills, Lela White, Elizabeth French Fletcher and Thomas Walton "Tommy" Haupt.. The Haupts were longtime farmers in Kyle. He is known to have gone on a fishing trip with friends to Colorado in the summer of 1913.  Sadly, G.B. contracted a serious illness which he endured for the final two years of life. He died in Mountain City, TX at the age of 66 on April 18, 1927. An obituary was printed in the Austin American. Funeral services jointly were conducted by Rev. J.E. Morgan, of the Methodist Church, and Rev. Gilbert, of the Baptist Church. His remains sleep for the ages in the local Kyle Cemetery, but his grave is not believed to be marked. Mary Lorine lived for another 18 years. In Feb. 1929, she endured the untimely death of their son Thomas at the age of 19 following a lingering, four-year illness of Hodgkin's Disease. She passed away in Austin, TX on Nov. 27, 1945.

    Great-grandson Lewis McDowell "L.M." Haupt Sr. (1868-1963) was born on March 19, 1868 or in June 1868 or 1870 in Texas. (Records differ.) A bachelor at the age of 30, in 1900, he resided with his parents in Hays County, TX and was employed as a cattleman. He helped with his father's business affairs even after moving to the nearby town of Kyle. In 1873, he wed Lucy Gillespie Harris (1875-1968). They became the parents of four -- William Clodius Haupt, Lewis McDowell Haupt Jr., Erin Inez Moody and Mavis Harris Bennett. For decades, the Kyles were ranchers near Kyle. They belonged to the Wortham First Baptist Church. In about 1958, as Lewis reached his 90th birthday, the couple began living alternately with their adult children in Bryan, Coolidge and Wortham, TX. At the age of 95, he surrendered to the legion of death's angels on Sept. 21, 1963. The remains were lowered into the sacred soil of Kyle Cemetery. The Mexia Daily News carried an obituary. Lucy outlived him by five years. She died in Wortham at age 92 on March 4, 1968. Her funeral services were presided by Rev. Joe Cariker.

    Great-granddaughter Louise Haupt (1874- ? ) was born in 1874. Nothing more is known.

    Great-granddaughter Ouay "Touay" Haupt (1878-1947) -- also spelled "Touai" -- was born in May 1874 or 1878 in Texas. She was single in 1900 and dwelled with her parents in Hays County. She was joined in wedlock with William H. "W.H." Barbee (Dec. 7, 1872-1967). Together, they produced two known children, William Gaston "Pete" Barbee (1901-1960) and Mary Elizabeth Barbee (1911-1975). William earned a living over the years as a rancher and banker. They were Methodists, and he belong the the Kyle lodge of the Masons. Burdened with exhaustion from psychosis and senility at the age of 72, Touay was admitted to the Austin State Hospital, remaining for a month and 11 days until death. She surrendered to the angels on June 2, 1947. The body was shipped to San Marcos, TX for interment. William endured as a widower and lived for another two decades in Kyle. He married a second time on June 20 1949 to Lillian Taylor ( ? - ? ). William and Lillian made their dwelling in Childress and then moved in 1966 to Fort Worth to be nearer to her daughter, Mrs. Preeston Waller. The spirit of death claimed his life in Fort Worth at the age of 94 on Aug. 24, 1967. An obituary appeared in the Childress (TX) Index.

  • Grandson Lewis Houpt (1820-1873) was born on May 3, 1820 in Jackson, Clarke County, AL. Evidence suggests that he attended Washington and Lee College and graduated in 1848. At the age of about 38, in 1858, he was joined in wedlock with Matilda Dale (1833-1921), an immigrant from Ireland. Three known children of this union were Erin A. Weller, Lela Smith and Lewis William Houpt. The family was plunged into mourning when son Lewis died on April 6, 1872 at the age of about one. The family farm was located three miles south of Belmont, Sumter County, AL, and west of and across the river from Demopolis, Marengo County. The federal census of 1870 shows the family together in the Belmont location, with Lewis listed as a farmer, and the census-taker spelling their name "Hout." In an interesting twist, in 1870, several Black families named "Houpt" were near neighbors and all had the occupation of "farm labor" -- Alex (born 1830) and Judy Houpt and children Georgie, Nancy and George; Charles (born in Virginia 1810) and Minerva Houpt and family members Gabe, Sarah, Bettie, Charlie, Sam and Adaline; and Henry (born 1825) and Caroline Houpt and daughter Phalby. Who were they? And why did they bear the Houpt name?

    Lewis died at the age of 52, in Belmont, Sumter County, on Jan. 19, 1873. His remains were lowered under the sod of Houpt Cemetery. In April 1873, Matilda placed legal advertising in the Livingston Journal, advertising the upcoming Nov. 29  same of the family farm and contents, including horses, cattle, wagons, plows and farming implements. The ad said that "The stock of cattle to be sold is large and valuable, and presents special inducements to purchasers." Matilda survived as a widow for another 48 years. She made news in the Journal in May 1883 when giving a "bouquet party" in her home, featuring plays and music by her daughter Lela. By 1889-1890, her home community bore the name of "McDowell's," and in April 1890 her married daughter Erin returned from St. Louis for a visit of several weeks. She was joyous at the birth of daughter Lela's first baby and namesake in July 1894, only to be shattered in grief a month later when Lela died at age 29. Sadly, she sustained serious injuries in a fall in January 1921, and fearing the worst, her grandchildren were called to her bedside. There was to be no recovery. Ten days later, she surrendered to the spirit of death at age 88 on Jan. 25, 1921. An obituary in the Demopolis Times said that "Sumter county, the Demopolis Section, and the whole circle of acquaintances who knew her, suffered a loss... She had been for many years a resident of McDowell, living a life that endeared her to those with whom she came in contact, useful, faithful, generous, loving and kind. That she has fallen asleep removes her from the active affairs of life, but the memory she leaves behind fills many hearts with life that was not lived in vain." Funeral services were held at McDowell, conducted by the Rosenbush Furniture Company, led by Rev. J.R. Larkin of Coatopa. Her only survivors were her daughter Erin and granddaughter Lela Speed.

    Great-granddaughter Erin A. Houpt (1859-1942) was born in 1859. Her home in young womanhood was in Belmont, AL. In early Nov. 1881, when she would have been about age 22, she was united in matrimony with Confederate Civil War veteran William Henry Weller (July 7, 1838-1916) of St. Louis. In announcing the marriage, the Livingston Journal said it was "the 'event' of our neighborhhod, this week... It was celebrated with a simplicity that added to its impressiveness, and befitted the joining of loving hearts pledged in matrimony. There were few guests other than members of the Bride's family and her Sabbath's chool class." With her father deceased, she was given away in marriage by J.W. Phares, with Rev. James M. Patton presiding at the ceremony, held at McDowell's Station, "which was beautiful and impressive. But I must say something of the Bride's dress -- for the benefit of the Journal's feminine readers. She was arranged in a traveling dress of myrtle green cloth trimmed with plush of the same shade, and a hat to match; brilliant diamonds brightening the sombre costume... After partaking of a sumptuous Supper gracefully presided over by the hospitable mother of the Bride, the guests accompanied the happy couple to the Railroad station, where as the 7:40 train drew near, good-byes and good wishes were hurriedly spoken. In Miss Erin St. Louis gains a worthy Bride; while Belmont loses its most popular young lady -- though we have beauties left." In a separate article about the wedding, the Journal said "We are reminded that the Groom 'did service' in the South during the war -- defending Southern rights and opposing invading armies." The couple remained in St. Louis for a number of years, with Erin occasionally returned to her mother's home for visits of several weeks' duration. Together, they bore a brood of offspring, among them William H. Weller Jr., Rosa Lela Hood and Douglas H. Weller (March 23, 1888-1906). The Wellers later moved from St. Louis to Birmingham, AL, where he "was the founder of the first pipe shope here," said the Birmingham Post-Herald, "was one of the former owners of the street car and ice business, and also was head of the old Weller Rolling Mill company." Sadly, their son Douglas died at the age of 18 on Dec. 4, 1906. Interment was in the Houpt family cemetery in Alabama. The couple's final home together was in the Bayview Apartments in Birmingham. At the age of 78, William passed away in Birmingham on Christmas Day 1916. His remains were shipped to McDowell to be laid to rest in Houpt Cemetery. A notice in the Birmingham News said "his death followed an illness of several months," and the Post-Herald referred to him as "a pioneer citizen of the district." Daughter Rosa Lela Weller ( ? - ? ) resided in Anniston and Gadsden, AL and on Oct. 15, 1903, was joined in wedlock with William Alexander Hood ( ? - ? ), son of William Hood. Their wedding was announced in the Gadsden Times-News, which said the bride "is one of the handsomest young women in the state and ossesses a lovable character. Mr. Hood is a leading business young man in Birmingham and is well worthy of Miss Weller's heart and hand." An alumnus of Alabama Polytechnic Institute, William became a mining engineer and died in Birmingham on April 26, 1952. The Hoods' two children were Cmdr. William Alexander Hood Jr. of Jacksonville, FL and Mrs. Randle Brereton of Pittsburgh.

    Granddaughter Lela "Nelly" Houpt (1863-1894) was born in about 1863. As a young woman, she taught school in Belmont, AL, and appears to have given plays and performed music in parties hosted by her mother. She made news in 1885 when attending an exposition and bringing back souvenirs for each of her pupils. On Jan. 22, 1891, she joined her hand in marriage with Stephen Pitts Smith (1853-1905) of Meridian, in nuptials led by Rev. J.M. Patton. News of the happy event was printed in the Livingston Journal, which said that "Mr. Smith is surely to be congratulated upon having won our exceedingly worthy young lady. Our best wishes attend them through life." The newlyweds settled in Meridian, MS. The family rejoiced in the June 1, 1894 birth of their daughter Lela Stephanie. But doom replaced the joy a month later when mother Leila died at the age of 29, on July 1, 1894, in Lauderdale County. The body was brought back to Demopolis to sleep with her forbears in Houpt Cemetery. Their daughter Lela Stephanie (1894-1979) later wed Herman Grey Speed (Nov. 22, 1892-1928) and lived in McDowell. They were the parents of Louis Haupt Pinkney Speed (1914-1945), Elizabeth Dale Speed (1916-1917), Lela Dale Speed (1918-2001) and Helen Hermione Gideon (1923-1994).

  • Granddaughter Nancy "Anna" Haupt (1821-1866) was born on (?), 1821. She was said to be "an educated and intellectual woman," as profiled in Thomas Marshall Green's book Historic Families of Alabama. In about 1852, Anna married widower Alexander Keith Marshall "A.M." McDowell (April 19, 1806-1892), son of Samuel and Anna (Irvine) McDowell of Cynthiana, KY. Together, Anna and Alexander bore several known children, including Louise Irvine (McDowell) McDowell, William McDowell, Marshall McDowell, Joseph Sebastian McDowell, Anna McDowell and Lewis McDowell. Alexander's profile in Historic Families said that his:

    ...childhood was passed in Mercer [KY]. His mother dying when he was about ten years old, he was sent to Franklinton, Ohio, where he lived, alternatively, with his two elder brothers, and attended school. Later, he received instruction at the academy of the learned and celebrated Dr. Priestley, in Tennessee, where one of his classmates was Andrew J. Donelson, and afterward was sent to the college at Nashville. On attaining maturity, he bought land near Palmyra, Missouri, and while living there, married Priscilla, daughter of General Robert [Breckinridge] McAfee -- the historian of, and a gallant officer in, the War of 1812 -- who had removed from Kentucky to Missouri. After a brief residence in Missouri, he determined to settle permanently in the South; and while proceeding thither with his wife and their infant.

    He left Kentucky and "Went west" in 1829. He is known to have taken part in the Black Hawk War, of 1832, receiving a wound in the knee which disabled him for life. Five years later, his world was turned upside down in the  Ben Sherrod  steamboat tragedy of May 8, 1837. At the time, the McDowells were residing in Belmont, Sumter County in Alabama. The tragedy happened about midnight, when the Sherrod was in a race with the steamer Prairie on the Mississippi River. The Sherrod caught fire when its drunken crew allowed the boilers to become red-hot, which ignited stacks of wood and engulfed the vessel in a conflagration. According to an account in the Charleston (SC) Daily Courier, reprinted in the New York Daily Sun and Baltimore Sun, the steamboat Alton arrived soonafter, with its wake capsizing a number of passengers who had been floating on the wreckage. The Daily Courier added that "but from the carelessness or indiscretion of those on board, was the means of drowning many persons who were floating on the water... Mr. McDowell attributes the drowning of his wife to the indiscretion of the managers of the Alton, as she was floating safely on a plank at the time. Mr. McDowell sustained himself some time against the current, so that he floated only two miles down the river, and then swam ashore ten miles above Fort Adams... Mr. McDowell lost his wife, son, and a lady named Miss Frances Few, who was under his protection; also a negro servant."

    Catastrophic fire aboard the 'Ben Sherrod,' 1837, in which Alexander McDowell lost his 1st wife, young son and a slave. - Courtesy Lloyd's Stemboat Disasters and Internet Archive

    As a widower, after moving briefly to Missouri and then selling his property, he took his servants to Demopolis, Marengo County, AL, where be bought a cotton plantation. When the U.S. census was made, Anna and Alexander dwelled in Marengo, with 35-year-old Morris O'Connor, a Irish immigrant, living under their roof, possibly as an overseer of the workforce of slaves. A separate census of their slaves that year shows that they owned eight males and four females, ranging in age from 5 to 30. Records show that from Oct. 12, 1850 to Oct. 8, 1854, he was employed as a receiver in the land office of the Demopolis municipality. Also in 1854, he was a stockholder and secretary/treasurer of the Marengo Plank or Covered Road Company, which had received a loan from the State of Alabama in exchange for bonds to finance a new road in the community. Repayment of the loan, amounting to over $18,950, became an issue when the company tried to repay the loan in Confederate currency in 1864, a currency that was now illegal. As of 1872, the debt issue was tied up in litigation in the case Jemison et. al. vs. Governor of Alabama. Alexander went on to employment as a civil engineer, "for which he had been educated, until about four years before the war, when he became a resident of Demopolis," said Historic Families.

    By 1860 -- the year before the outbreak of the Civil War -- census records of Demopolis show Alexander's occupation as civil engineer, and may have already disposed of the cotton farm, as he has not been found in a similar slave census schedule for that year. Historic Families went on to say that "His condition did not prevent his early enlistment in the southern army, but he was soon detailed from the line to other and more important duties." In fact, he is known to have served as a major in the 43rd Alabama Infantry. Then  at about the time of the Confederate surrender, he was chosen probate judge of Marengo County, just across the Black Warrior River, in what was then the county seat of Demopolis. His lifetime of heartbreak was compounded when 45-year-old Anna died in Demopolis three days after Christmas 1866. Her remains were interred in Houpt Cemetery, with a tall marker erected at the site, inscribed with the scripture, "I know that my redeemer liveth." In 1868 he sold out what possessions in Alabama the war had left him, and removed to St. Louis, where he remained until 1873, when he became a citizen of Cynthiana [KY], and afterward clerk of the Harrison circuit court. A handsome, stately gentleman, of winning and graceful manners, sunny temper, extensive reading, and attractive gifts, he is also an uncompromising Calvinist." Alexander passed away in the home of his son on June 15, 1892. Burial was in Battle Grove Cemetery in Cynthiana. An obituary in the Clarksville (TN) Leaf-Chronicle said that he "was largely connected in Lexington and was a wealthy, influential and honored citizen." A one-sentence death notice appeared in the St. Louis Globe-Democrat. A tall, prominent, red stone was placed at the grave. Their family is spelled out in Dorothy Kelly MacDowell's book McDowells in America: A Genealogy. He was profiled in the book The Irvines and Their Kin, by Lucinda Joan (Rogers) Boyd:

    Judge McDowell was as near perfect manhood as a human being could be. He was a scholar, a soldier, and a true Christian. At the time of his his death it was said of him: Judge McDowell has bequeathed to his descendants a legacy of far more worth than the long line of ancestry from which he came, or the armorial bearing that would hav been carved above his place of repose had he died in Scotland, the father of his people -- a spotless name. Carve above his tomb, :Resurgam." He was a true Christian.

          
    Louise and Dr. Hervey McDowell
    Courtesy "HistoryNut" (left) and Annette Bradford (right)

    Great-granddaughter Louise Irvine McDowell (1840-1916) was born on Dec. 2, 1840. In 1860, unmarried, she lived at home with her parents in Marengo County, AL. She wed a cousin, Dr. Hervey McDowell (April 16, 1835-1901), son of John Lyle and Nancy Hawthorne (Vance) McDowell of Cynthiana, KY. He was described in Green's Historic Families of Kentucky as "With a large, well-formed head, a square forehead and prominent brow; a very large, clear, pale-blue eye that looks squarely at you and sometimes glitters like steel; a full jaw and chin, indicating the utmost resolution and force; an athletic person -- with features that are so peculiar to his race... About his menner there is a quiet reserve; his appearance and bearing impress all who meet him as those of a man absolutely impenetrable to fear, and as absolutely incapable of falsehood and any kind of meanness. The soldieers who fought by his side in the Confederate army describe his courage as heroic, his coolness and composure under the heaviest fire as phenomenal. These characteristics were most amply tested ... in prison, in camp, on the march, in the hottest fights of the bloody war; in victory and defeat; always uncomplaining, calm, energetic and daring, he exhibited the best qualities of a soldier." Their large brood of offspring included Rev. Hervey McDowell Jr. (1871-1943), Marshall McDowell (1872-1939), Edward Campbell McDowell (1874-1955), Marion S. McDowell (1876-1900), Sebastian Haupt McDowell (1877-1926), Anna Mary McDowell (1879-1894), Jo Desha McDowell (1883-1958). 

    Hervey and his parents moved to Owen County, KY when he was 12, and they settled along the Kentucky River. After completing his grade school studies, he took a preparatory course at Drennon Springs and then in 1856 graduated from the Kentucky MIlitary Institute at Frankfort. Desiring a career in medicine, he studied under Dr. Ethelbert Dudley and Dr. Henry Skillman at Lexington and attended the annual meetings of the Missouri Medical College in St. Louis, graduating in 1858. He then moved to Cynthiana, KY, practicing medicine for two years. At the outbreak of the Civil War, said the book History of the Orphan Brigade, "he took fire, after the manner of the old Covenanter, who had impressed his traits so powerfully on his descendants, and entered the Confederate army. Hervey was placed in the 2nd Kentucky Infantry (Hanson's), Company F. He took part in all of his regiment's engagements and was promoted to captain and then to major after the Battle of Chickamauga and lieutenant colonel in 1864 after the Battle of Jonesboro. He was severely wounded in the head and side in the Battle of Fort Donelson and taken prisoner, shipped to the Union POW camp at Johnson Island, OH, along Lake Erie. He finally was exchanged and returned to Vicksburg, with his regiment combining with others to form the Orphan Brigade. Other battles in which he fought were Hartsville, Stones River, Mission Ridge and many skirmishes from Dalton to Jonesboro, "to the sea and through the Carolinas." He was wounded in both arms at Stones River and hit in three other places and also received a wound at Chickamauga. After the war, he joined the Ben Desha Camp No. 99 at Cynthiana, believed to have been a Confederate veterans group. He is pictured in W.E. Mickle's Well Known Confederates and their War Records (New Orleans, 1907).

    Louise is said to have been "an accomplished lady, of native talent broadened by elegant culture, whose general and accurate information, not less than her ready and sportive wit, render her the most interesting of correspondents, the most charming of conversationalists." She was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution (no. 11532) based on the service of her grandfather, Samuel McDowell Jr., said to have fought in Lafayette's army and who was at the siege of Yorktown. Hervey in the postwar years was an elder in the Presbyterian Church and in 1878 elected president of the Cynthiana school board. Sadly, Hervey passed away on Nov. 6, 1901. An obituary in the Paris (KY) Bourbon News said he was "one of the best known and best loved physicians in Central Kentucky... Dr. McDowell belongs to the family of that name so distinguished in early history of Kentucky, and added luster to the reputation of a race of men rarely equalled for their noble qualities." Louise outlived her husband by 15 years. Death enveloped her on Feb. 23, 1916. Son Edward wed Rosa Gray Pickett ( ? - ? ), and son Sebastian was a farmer in Cynthiana and belonged to the Masons and Elks organizations. Son Rev. Hervey Jr. was an 1893 graduate of Washington and Lee University and married Jane Kavanaugh Lusk (Dec. 20, 1870- ? ), daughter of William Jennings Lusk, and produced two daughters, Elizabeth Lusk McDowell and Mary Louise McDowell. Hervey Jr. and Jane lived in Garyville, LA, spent their summers in "Argyle" near Heldelbert, MS.

    Great-grandson William McDowell (1843- ? )

    Great-grandson Marshall McDowell (1845-1846) was born on May 4, 1845. He only lived for 16 months until the angel of death cleaved him away on Sept. 21, 1846. The remains sleep for all eternity in Houpt Cemetery.  

    Great-grandson Joseph Sebastian McDowell (1847-1851) was born on Sept. 4, 1847. Joseph died at the age of four on Dec. 7, 1851. Burial of the remains was in the family graveyard.

    Great-granddaughter Anna McDowell (1849- ? ) grew up in Demopolis, Marengo County, AL. She is said to have "died unmarried" as per an entry in the 1908 book, Genealogy of the Greenlee Families, by Ralph Stebbins Greenlee and Robert Lemuel Greenlee.

    Great-grandson Lewis McDowell (1854- ? ) was born in about 1854. 

  • Granddaughter Sebastiana M. Houpt (1836-1843) was born in Jan. 1836. Sadly, she did not live past childhood. The spirit of death whisked her away in late Oct. 1843, at the age of about seven. Her tender remains were placed into eternal sleep in the family's Houpt Cemetery. A stone was erected at her grave, and is still legible today.

Daughter Maria Elizabeth Haupt (1783-1786) was born on March 16, 1783 in Springfield Township, Bucks County. She received the rite of Christian baptism on May 11, 1783. Sadness blanketed the family at her death at two-plus years of age in 1786. Burial was in Durham Church Cemetery.

Son Abraham Haupt (1785-1874) was born on Feb. 17, 1785. In 1818, he wed Catherine Von Billiard (Feb. 8, 1797-1879 ? ) of Northampton County, PA. They too migrated to Illinois, settling in Mount Carmel, Wabash County. Their family of children included Catherine "Kate" Baker, Sarah Hundardesse, Mary Baker, Eliza Frazer, Jemima Haupt, Edwin Sebastian Haupt and Henrietta Sebastina Kimball. Grief covered the family when daughter Jemima died at the age of about 23 on Dec. 1, 1853. Abraham passed into the arms of the angels on Sept. 29, 1874. Catherine lived on for another five years. Death claimed her on May 1, 1879. Burial was in Baker Family Cemetery in Wabash County.

  • Granddaughter Catherine "Kate" Haupt (1819- ? ) was born on Feb. 11, 1819. She was unmarried as of 1850, when she shared a home with her married sister Eliza Frazier in Waltz, Wabash County, IN. On Dec. 10, 1856, in nuptials held at Reading, PA, she married her widowed uncle by marriage, Dr. Ezra Baker Jr. (Dec. 23, 1794-1870). See the entry on this page for her aunt, Elisabeth (Haupt) Baker, daughter of John "Henry" Sebastian and Maria Catharina (Younken) Haupt.
  • Granddaughter Sarah Haupt (1821-1850) was born on Oct. 10, 1821. She was joined in marriage with (?) Hunderdasse ( ? - ? ), also spelled "Hundardesse" and "Hunderdassa," a pastor of the Lutheran Church. He is believed to have been "Rev. C." Hunderdasse, who served the St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church two miles southwest of Olney in the 1850s. Later he also led the Salem Evangelical Lutheran congregation, renamed Saint James Evangelical Lutheran Church. Together, they produced a duo of children, both of whom died young. Sarah died on either June 28 or July 9, 1850. Interment was in the Baker Family Cemetery in Gard's Point, Wabash County.
  • Granddaughter Mary Haupt (1822-1875) was born on Jan. 24, 1822. On June 6, 1841, she entered into wedlock with George W.S. Baker (1816- ? ), a New Jersey native and a half-brother of their brother-in-law Dr. Ezra Baker. They settled on a farm in Wabash County, IL. Nine offspring in this family were Ruth Eliza Baker, Florence Sebastina Baker, Franklin A.B. Baker, William Haupt Baker, Dora Catherine Baker, Effie Caroline Baker, Ezra George Baker, Nellie Marie Baker and Abraham Lincoln Baker. When the federal census enumeration was made in 1860, the Bakers dwelled in Bonpas, Wabash County. George may have died during the 1860s, as Mary is shown in the 1870 census as heading a household of their children in Lick Prairie, Wabash County. In addition to Mary's seven children, teenager Sarah Gard lived under her roof in 1870. Mary died at Wabash on June 27, 1875.

    Great-granddaughter Ruth Eliza Baker (1844- ? ) was born on Oct. 5, 1844 in Illinois. Single at the age of 24, she was employed as a teacher and lived at home in Lick Prairie, Wabash County, IL.

    Great-granddaughter Florence Sebastina Baker (1847-1870) was born in December 1846 or 1847 in Wabash County, IL. She succumbed to the spectre of death on Jan. 4, 1870.

    Great-grandson Franklin A.B. Baker (1849-1859) was born on June 5, 1849 in Wabash County, IL. Sadly, he died at the age of about 10 in 1859.

    Great-grandson William Haupt Baker (1851- ? ) was born on Nov. 24, 1851 in Wabash County, IL. William secured a position as a mail carrier for the U.S. Post Office and worked in this occupation in 1870 in Lick Prairie, Wabash County.

    Great-granddaughter Dora Catherine "Kate" Baker (1854- ? ) was born in March 1854 in Wabash County, IL.

    Great-granddaughter Effie Caroline Baker (1856-1868) was born on Oct. 8, 1856 in Wabash County, IL. She passed away in 1868.

    Great-grandson Ezra George Baker (1859- ? ) was born on April 5, 1859 in Wabash County, IL. Evidence suggests that he was the same Ezra George Baker, born on April 6, 1862 in Indiana, died April 7, 1941 in Kern County, CA.  

    Great-granddaughter Nellie Marie Baker (1862- ? ) was born on March 19, 1862.

    Great-grandson Abraham Lincoln Baker (1864- ? ) was born on Nov. 10, 1864.

  • Granddaughter Eliza Haupt (1825-1904) was born on Jan. 20, 1825 in Bucks County. She was baptized on Feb. 30, 1825, in the Durham Union Church of Durham Township, Bucks County, with Thomas Cressman standing as her sponsor. When she was 21 years of age, on June 28, 1846, she was united in matrimony with Dr. Milton David Frazer (April 26, 1824-1912) of Indiana. Together, the pair bore a family of six -- Dorsey Frazer, Caroline Frazer, Henry Frazer, Dr. Charles Frazer, Fremont Frazer and Edwin Haupt Frazer. Grief enveloped the family when eldest son Dorsey died at only a few weeks of age on April 15, 1848. When the federal census was enumerated in 1850, the Frazers dwelled in Yorktown/Waltz, Wabash County, IN, with Milton working as a physician. At that time, Eliza's 26-year-old sister Catharine lived under their roof. Milton continued the practice of medicine during the 1850s and 1860s, with the family relocating by 1860 to Jackson Township near Xenia, Miami County, IN. Then by 1863, they migrated once more, this time to Bridgeport, Lawrence County, IL. They stayed in Bridgeport for good. Milton in 1863 helped to found the Bridgeport lodge of the Masons. Of Eliza, the Sumner Press once said that:

    For forty-three years Mrs. Frazer has lived in our midst and taken a prominent part in the social and religious life of Bridgeport and surrounding country. As a child she was confirmed by the Lutheran Church, but after her marriage united with the Methodist Episcopal Church and with that church in Bridgeport in 1862, but she has continuously work ever since as Sunday school teacher, class leader and in any capacity her services were needed. Her home was the haven for Methodist preachers and the latch string always hung out for ministers of other denominations. Her hand was an open one. It was ready to grasp that of neighbor and extended toward the stranger. She gave of her substance-food, clothing and money-to the relief of the poor. She visited and minister to the sick and afflicted, soothing their sufferings and comforting their spirits. She was a consolation to the bereaved and was indeed a benediction to those who came under her influence. Mrs. Frazer had left her impression upon the community in which she so long resided, and while she has been taken away from us her life and character will live in the hearts and memories of all who knew her.

    Tragedy rocked the family in 1884 when their son Frazer, a drugstore owner, was burned and died when a lamp he was lighting exploded and covered him with flaming oil. Census records for 1900 show the empty-nesters in Bridgeport, having been married for 53 years but outliving three of their six offspring. Sadness covered the family when Eliza, having suffered an illness for several months, passed away in their residence on Aug. 4, 1904. Milton survived for another eight years. At the age of 88, he was preparing for a trip to Tipton, IN to see his granddaughter Bonnie Pugh and family. But death came quickly and without warning and he passed away on June 6, 1912. Burial was in Bridgeport City Cemetery in Lawrence County, IL. Word of his demise was sent to the granddaughter in Indiana.

    Great-granddaughter Caroline Frazer (1848-1907) was born on Nov. 12, 1848 in Yorktown, Delaware County, IN. On Oct. 25, 1871, in Lawrence County, IL, she married Robert B. Beauchamp (1845-1908), son of Curtis and Rachel (Schooley) Beauchamp. The young family moved to Tipton, IN. Their two known daughters were Bonnie Pugh and Ora "Edith" Proctor. Beauchamp. Robert was a lawyer and profiled in the 1883 History of Tipton County: "When the subject of this sketch was about one year old, his father removed with him to Miami County, Indiana, where he had entered 160 acres of land from the Government, on the present site of Amboy. That section of country was then an almost uninhabited wilderness, but he soon had a large portion of his wild tract of land converted into a productive farm... R.B. Beauchamp received his education from the common schools of the State and the high school of Marion, the county seat of Grant county. Several years were spent in teaching, when, in 1869, he took up the study of the law at Marion, Indiana. After two years' study, he removed to Tipton, and entered upon the practice of his profession. In 1872, after a residence of one year, he was elected district Attorney of the district, including the counties of Tipton, Hamilton, Howard, Clinton and Grant. But the General Assembly of 1872-1873 abolished common Pleas courts and the office of District Attorney, so that Mr. Beauchamp only discharged the duties of that office about three months." For two years, from 1874 to 1876, he served as prosecuting attorney for the county. He also was in private law practice partnership, Beauchamp and Gifford, which then combined with N.R. Overman to become Overman, Beauchamp and Gifford. When Overman became a judge in 1880, the firm reverted back to Beauchamp and Gifford. Robert left the partnership in 1883. Then from 1902 to 1906, he and Judge Walter W. Mount combined their practices. Sadly, Caroline died in Indianapolis at the age of 58 on July 9, 1907. Her remains were placed into eternal repose in Tipton's Fairview Cemetery. Robert lasted for another year. At the age of 62, he succumbed to the spectre of death on Sept. 16, 1908. Daughter Edith married (?) Proctor and moved to Richmond, VA. Daughter Bonnie (1871-1945) was considered an "early advocate and organizer of the Indianapolis day nursery," said a newspaper. Bonnie wed Edwin B. Pugh ( ? - ? ), onetime prosecuting attorney for Marion County, IN. The Pughs' daughter was Caroline Beauchamp Silmer, a novelist who died in 1937.

    Great-grandson Henry Frazer (1851-1856) was born on Jan. 8, 1851. He only lived to the age of five and died in 1856.

    Great-grandson Dr. Charles Frazer (1852-1928) was born on April 9, 1852. Charles became a physician. Circa 1877, he was joined in wedlock with Rebecca Ann Tevis (Oct. 1855-1925). They bore two daughters together, Mabel Allen (1878-1966) and Belle Hill (1885-1943). The Frazers put down roots in Whiteley near Muncie, IN, where he opened a medical practice. The pair is known to have spent the winter of 1910 in Houston, TX. In about 1915, their daughter Mabel relocated to Orlando, FL, and her parents soonafter followed in a move to Florida. They lived in Orlando for a 11 years until Rebecca's death on Nov. 25, 1925. The widowed Charles remained in Orlando until about 1927 when he relocated to Lake Hamilton near Winter Haven. He died on Jan. 17, 1928. Funeral services were officiated by Rev. O.E. Rice of the First Methodist Church, and the remains laid to rest in Greenwood Cemetery. An obituary was printed in the Orlando Sentinel. Both of the daughters spent their lives in the Orlando area.

    Great-grandson Fremont Frazer (1855-1884) was born on Jan. 27, 1855. He may have owned a drugstore in Bridgeport, IL. Tragedy struck on the fateful day of Feb. 23, 1884. Said the Chicago Tribune, "Mr. Frazer was filling the lamps in his drug-store, when one of them exploded, covering his clothing with burning oil. Mr. Frazer was a prominent business-man and highly esteemed." His age at death was 29 years, one month and seven days. His remains were laid to rest in Bridgeport City Cemetery in Lawrence County, IL.

    Great-grandson Edwin Haupt Frazer Sr. (1857-1943) was born on July 28, 1857 in Xenia, Miami County, IN. On the Fourth of July 1878, as a 19-year-old, he was selected to recite the Declaration of Independence at a celebration at Lanterman's Grove near Mount Carmel. He became an attorney and in 1880, at age 23, the practice of law was his occupation. By 1890, he moved to Atlanta and formed a partnership with James F. O'Neill, with offices at 27½ Whitehall Street. The Atlanta Journal said in March 1890 that "The firm of O'Neill and Frazer practices in all the courts and solicits all kinds of legal business." As of 1893, he was in partnership with another lawyer and operating their firm as "Frazier & Hynds." Then circa 1895, he wed Lucy (1858-1921?). Their only son was Edwin Haupt Frazer Jr. By 1904, Edwin opened a law office in the Century Building. His son Edwin Jr. relocated from Atlanta to El Paso, TX, and sent a letter home which was reprinted in the Atlanta Constitution on March 22, 1903, headlined "An Atlanta Boy Writes of Life Out in Texas." The son later returned to Atlanta. In 1910, Edwin, Lucy and their son all were roomers in the home of newspaperman William F. Crusselle on Atlanta's Spring Street. The Frazers pulled up their stakes during the 1910s and migrated to the District of Columbia, with Edwin continuing his law practice in an all-new city. The 1920 census shows them in one household with their married son (1891-1965) and his bride Helen B. (1896- ? ). In 1935, the family made a home in Cedar Grove, Essex County, NJ and by 1940 all moved to Newark. Edwin Sr. and his son became newspaper publishers in New Jersey with the Roseville Citizen. They all lived together in 1940 along with Edwin Jr.'s children Annabelle and Edwin. Sadly, Edwin Sr. died in Newark, NJ on Feb. 7, 1943. A brief notice of his death was printed in the Bridgewater (NJ) Courier-News.

  • Granddaughter Jemima Haupt (1830-1853) was born in about 1830. She died at the age of about 23 on Dec. 1, 1853. Burial was the Baker Family Cemetery in Gards Point, Wabash County. The cause of her untimely death may be lost to the mists of history.
  • Grandson Edwin Sebastian Haupt (1834-1920) was born on May 28, 1834. On Aug. 21, 1856, in nuptials held northwest of Mount Carmel, IL, he tied the marital knot with Ellen Smithers (1837-1896). They appear to have dwelled in Gard's Point (1877) and Lick Prairie, near Mount Carmel. Of their six children, the identities of five are known -- Isabella Hester Haupt, Sarah Ellen Risley, Charles Fremont Haupt, Catherine "Katie" Haupt and William Henry Haupt. Edwin was active in church governance. He is known in January 1878 to have part of a committee including B.A. Sherer and Samuel Howell that met at Cabbage Corneers "to determine who the church belongs to," reported the Mount Carmel Register, "and make preparation to repair it or build a new one." Two months later, in March, he was elected a new trustee of the congregation. In the awards category of needle and knitting work, Ellen won prizes for her bedspread and coverlet at the second annual Grange Fair in September 1887. By April 1896, Edwin was elected a director of the Friend Grove School. Sadly, Ellen died in their Cabbage Corner home two days after Christmas in 1896. An obituary in the Register said that the "death of this excellent lady occurred Sunday at the family residence..., she being the daughter of one of the early residents of the county... Mrs. Haupt was a good friend, neighbor, wife and mother, and her death will be regretted by all who knew her." Burial followed in Baker Cemetery. Edwin outlived his bride by 24 years and in 1899 wed again to Carrie (Best) Mundy (Sept. 25, 1854-1920), widow of W.H. Mundy and daughter of George and Elizabeth (Whealen) Best of Latina, OH. She brought four stepchildren to the union -- Verner C. Mundy, Bertha Gould, Dr. H.F. Mundy and E. Guy Mundy. The pair made their home at the address of 1217 Mulberry Street. Carrie was a longtime member of the Nesbit Chapel Methodist Episcopal Church and the Women's Christian Temperance Union. Edwin surrendered to the angel of death at the age of 86 on June 2, 1920. A short funeral service was held in the residence, led by Rev. C.L. Peterson. His pallbearers included grandsons Emmett Risley, Milton Risley, Wilmer Risley, Roy Hare, Elwood Hare and Raymond Risley. Carrie only lived for another six months, enduring what was called "multiple neuritis." Death came to claim her on Dec. 12, 1920, at the age of 66. Carrie's burial occurred in Gard's Point Cemetery. Some years later, Ellen's remains appear to have been moved to Highland Memorial Cemetery in Mount Carmel in May 1938.

    Great-granddaughter Isabella Hester Haupt (1857- ? ) was born on Aug. 28, 1857.

    Great-granddaughter Sarah Ellen "Sallie" Haupt (1860- ? ) was born on Feb. 5, 1860. She tied the marital knot with William Simon Risley (1862-1915). The couple's brood of children included Eugene Clyde Risley, Laura Ellen Cluff, Milton Ezra Risley, Wilmer Edwin Risley, Henrietta Haupt Beesley and Emmett George Risley. At the age of 89, Sarah died on Oct. 11, 1949. Her remains were placed under the sod of Rose Hill Cemetery in Mount Carmel.

    Great-grandson Charles Fremont Haupt (1862- ? ) was born on June 2, 1862.

    Great-granddaughter Catherine "Katie" Haupt (1864-1871) was born on Sept. 16, 1864. Sadly, she did not survive childhood, and surrendered to the angel of death in 1871, at the age of about seven. Her remains were lowered into the welcoming soil of Baker Family Cemetery at Gards Point, Wabash County.

    Great-grandson William Henry Haupt (1868- ? ) was born on Sept. 27, 1874.

  • Centennial History of Grant County, Indiana - Courtesy Google Books

  • Dr. Abner D. Kimball
    Courtesy Google Books
    Granddaughter Henrietta Sebastina Haupt (1838- ? ) was born on April 15, 1838 or 1839. On Oct. 1, 1865, she married Dr. Abner Daniel Kimball (Jan. 24, 1839-1904) of Xenia, OH, the son of Moses and Louisa (Powell) Kimball. Their four children were Maude Kimball (who died in infancy), Clyde M.B. Kimball, Nellie Pauline Kimball and Edwin Haupt Kimball. During the Civil War, in Oct. 1864, Abner joined the Union Army and was placed within the 99th Indiana Infantry, Company I. He is said to have taken part in Gen. William Tecumseh Sheerman's famed "March to the Sea" and thence moved toward the Confederate capitol in Richmond. Then on July 1, 1865, he was transferred to the 48th Indiana Infantry, Company D, as assistant surgeon. Abner was profiled and pictured in the 1914 book, Centennial History of Grant County, Indiana:  

    Few men of the past generation in Grant county, Indiana, have been more sorely missed or more sincerely mourned than the late Dr. Abner D. Kimball. He is not only missed because of his high professional ability but also because of his splendid personality and the gifts that won him the friendship of the entire county. He bore the reputation of being one of the most skillful surgeons in the state of Indiana, but he had another reputation of which he was much prouder and that was of having the ability of winning everyone for his friend. For many years he was closely identified with the interests of Marion, Indiana, being chief surgeon of the Marion branch of the National Military Home, and he took an active part in the life of the people of Marion... Dr. Abner D. Kimball grew up on the farm of his father, acquiring his elementary education in the schools of Miami and Grant counties, Indiana. He then attended the high school in Marion and then took up the study of medicine with Dr. Frazier, of Converse, Indiana. This was in 1857, and during the following winter he attended his first course of lectures in Rush Medical College, at Chicago. During 1859 and 1860 he attended his second course of lectures and in the spring of 1860 he was graduated from this famous old middle west institution which has turned out so many of the best physicians and surgeons in the country. Immediately after his graduation he began the practice of his profession at Converse, Indiana, and here he remained until he enlisted in the fall of 1862 in the Union army. He was mustered into the service as first assistant surgeon of the Forty-eighth Indiana Infantry and later on in the course of the war he served as acting assistant surgeon of the Ninety-ninth Indiana Infantry...

    After the war the doctor resumed his practice in Converse, Indiana, and remained there until 1884 when he removed to Marion. Here on the 20th of May, 1890, he received the appointment as chief surgeon of the Marion branch of the National Military Home for Disabled Volunteers. He held this position for many years, filling the post to the great satisfaction of both the soldiers unto whom he ministered and of those in authority who had placed him in charge. Shortly after the war in the winter of 1868-1869, Dr. Kimball took a course in surgery in Bellevue Hospital in New York City, and after that time he was always especially interested in surgery and in the advance which that branch of medical science has made of late years, for he had seen the horrors of the crude surgery of the battlefield and realized how necessary a greater knowledge was to surgeons. He died in Marion, November 4, 1904. Dr. Kimball was a member of the Grant County Medical Society of the Indiana State Medical Society and also of the Association of Army Surgeons of the United States. Fraternally he was a member of the Masons and was a Knight Templar in this order. He was also a member of the Loyal Legion.

    He applied for and received a soldier's pension as of Dec. 19, 1879 [Invalid App. #325.224 - Cert. #274.345] death claimed Abner on Nov. 5, 1904. Henrietta then was awarded her late husband's pension and received monthly checks for the balance of her years. [Widow App. #818.703 - Cert. #637.678] Henrietta passed away at the age of 91 on Feb. 20, 1931.

    Great-grandson Clyde M.B. Kimball (1867- ? ) was born on Feb. 17, 1867.

    Great-granddaughter Nellie Pauline Kimball (1870- ? ) was born on April 7, 1870.

    Centennial History of Grant County, Indiana - Courtesy Google Books

    Edwin Haupt Kimball
    Courtesy Google Books
    Great-grandson Edwin Haupt Kimball (1874- ? ) was born on Sept. 26 or 27, 1874 in Xenia, Miami County, IN. He moved with his family in his youth to Marion, IN where he graduated from high school. He began studying for a career in medicine at the Indiana Medical College, but this path of education was interrupted when the Spanish-American War broke out, and he enlisted in the U.S. Army's medical corps. After the war was over he took up the study of dentistry, and was graduated from the Indiana Dental College in 1901. On the April 28, 1898, he was joined in wedlock with Ella Vivian Douris ( ? - ? ), daughter of John and Mary Douris of Bedford, IN. He too was featured and pictured in a biography in the 1914 volume, Centennial History of Grant County, Indiana, saying he was:

    ...one of the younger business men of that city, is at present serving efficiently as auditor of Grant county. He is a native of Indiana and has lived during the greater part of his life in Grant county, where he has won a place for himself in the affectionate regard of the citizens of the community. The Kimball family is one of the best known in this section of Indiana, the father of Edwin H. Kimball, Dr. A. D. Kimball being one of the most popular men in this part of the state, Dr. Abner Daniel Kimball was born in Coshocton, Ohio, and lived in Grant county, Indiana for many years. He was a man of great nobility of character and was a friend to men of all classes, winning deserved popularity through his kindness of heart and generosity of spirit. He married Henrietta Haupt, who was a native of the state of Illinois. They became the parents of four children. Maude, the eldest, is now deceased, Clyde lives in Wabash county, Indiana, Nellie P. Kimball, of Marion and Edwin H. Dr. Kimball died on the 4th of November, 1904. ... Returning to Marion he began the practice of dentistry and for twelve years he was a successful practitioner in his home city. In 1911 he was elected auditor of Grant county, and assumed office in 1912. He has served in this office since that time to the entire satisfaction of the residents of this county. In politics Mr. Kimball is a member of the Republican party. is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons and of the Knights of Pythias. He also belongs to the Sons of Veterans and to the Spanish-American War Veterans Association. In religious matters he is a member of the Presbyterian church, and his college fraternity is Delta Sigma Delta, which is a professional fraternity. He is a member of the Elks, No. 195, of Marion.

Daughter Catherine Haupt (1788-1849) was born in April 1788. She was united in holy matrimony with clockmaker Septimus Evans ( ? - ? ), son of Capt. Nathan Evans, a Welshman and officer during the Revolutionary War who fought in the battles of Germantown and Brandywine. They lived in Doylestown and moved to Jenkintown, PA where Catherine was a school teacher. Nine children produced in this family were Jacob Evans, Henry S. Evans, Palmeral Evans, Samuel Evans, Jemima Carruthers, Eliza Evans, Sarah Newton, Columbus Penn Evans and Mary Baker Pennock. Circa 1811, he contracted with John Dungan and James Wigton to deliver 100 perches of stone to be "quarried and perched on the bank at his quarry by his house," said J.H. Battle's 1887 History of Bucks County. Using stone materials, Septimus "built the house of Mrs. A.J. LaRue, Broad and Main, where he carried on watchmaking," said the 1876 History of Bucks County by William Watts Hart Davis. "This house was kept as a tavern many years." Sadly, he died at a relatively young age, leaving a widow with eight small children "to battle with the world almost without means," said the 1872 book, History of Chester County, Pennsylvania. Their descendants were "well represented in Chester and Delaware counties" in the 1930s, wrote genealogist Anita (Smith) Eyster.  

  • Grandson Jacob Evans ( ? - ? ). He learned the gunsmith's trade and migrated south. Nothing more about him is known.
 
Pennsylvania lawmaker Henry Sebastian Evans and his profile in the History of Chester County.  - Courtesy Google Books
  • Grandson Henry Sebastian Evans (1813-1872) was born on April 1, 1813 in Doylestown, Bucks County. In 1841, he wed Jane Darlington (Feb. 28, 1817- ? ), daughter of Dr. William Darlington, a celebrated botanist. The Evanses resided in West Chester, PA. They bore seven children, of whom five are known -- Barton Darlington Evans, William Darlington Evans, Catherine Lacey Evans, Henrietta Sebastian Borden and Septimus Lacey Evans. He was profiled in the History of Chester County, Pennsylvania, by J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope (Philadelphia: Louis H. Everts, 1881).

    At the early age of thirteen. Henry was apprenticed to Hon. Charles Miner, who then published the Village Record at West Chester, to learn the printing trade. Mr. Miner was one of the leading public men of the State at that time, had served in Congress, and was a most polished man, -- a master calculated to awaken all the ambition of the youthful Evans and fit him for a public career. The life of an apprentice fifty years ago was very different from that of to-day, and a boy was expected to perform any task his master set. Newspaper publishers then delivered their papers to their country subscribers, and three days in the week, winter and summer, found young Evans astride the saddle-bags "riding post" over the county. Evenings found him poring over books, and he soon began to contribute to the Record articles which won the favorable criticism of so polished a writer as Mr. Miner. Newspaper writing in those days was modeled after the style of essays, hence we find the Village Record fifty years ago quite different from the newsy paper that it afterwards became under its whilom apprentice. Young Evans' apprenticeship ended when he was nineteen, and May 11, 1833, he started forth to battle with the world with little money, but much courage. Six pages of diary kept by him at that time give so well the story of his experiences that we will quote his own words. After some weeks spent in visiting his relatives, he says, 

    "Went to Philadelphia and obtained work at Howe's type-foundry, and remained three weeks and three days, when the business of the office began to fail. Being now obliged to 'stand' or change situation, I took the latter alternative, and took my passage for New York at 6 A.M. Friday, June 22, 1833. Took my lodgings in New York at Tammany Hall; the terms were $2 per week for a room and bed; board of course was not included. The rain caused me to add a new article of expense, -this was an umbrella, for which I paid $3.50, a pretty heavy sum in these times. Having frequently felt the want of such an article, I determined to avoid the inconvenience in the future; but even these reflections were not sufficient, after I had purchased it, to reconcile my mind until I resorted to the old saying, I think of Pope, that what is, is right;' this idea has more than once poured comfort into my tortured mind. Business dull in New York. Called at several printing-offices but found no work. Remained three days, and resolved to return to Philadelphia. Found myself without money to return; steamboat fare was $3. Was obliged to sell my umbrella at the place where bought it. The merchant would only allow $2. Heavy loss. No work in Philadelphia. Returned to West Chester; saw an advertisement in Telegraph, Germantown, for jour. Set off on foot for that place; engaged it at $6 per week. Found employment five or six weeks with Mr. Freas. Despairing of journey-work, issued a prospectus for Waynesburg Press, in Chester County. Set out for Waynesburg on foot; made known my intentions to the people, and went around and solicited subscribers. Obtained 500 and started the Press." 

    The diary ends here never to be resumed, for the leisure time of the writer was at an end. The new paper required hard work, and the income was so small that often two meals a day had to suffice the young publisher, because there were no means to buy the third. In 1834, Mr. Miner, who wished to retire from business, offered the Village Record to Mr. Evans, which was gladly accepted, and moving to West Chester, he assumed control. Under his charge the paper grew in circulation and influence, until it became an institution in the county, and the leading country paper of the State. In political and public matters Mr. Evans took an active and influential part, and soon was recognized as a leader. In 1846 the Whigs elected him to represent Chester County in the House of Representatives of Pennsylvania, and re-elected him in 1847 and 1848. His abilities and energy soon made him one of the leading members of the House, and he exerted much influence on legislation. In the session of 1849 he was the Whig candidate for Speaker, the Democratic candidate being William F. Packer, of Lycoming County, afterwards Governor. The House was composed of 47 Whigs, 50 Democrats, and 3 "Native Americans." Mr. Evans polled the solid Whig and "Native" vote for twenty-one ballots, the result of each ballot being a tie. On the twenty-second ballot the three "Natives" cast their ballots for Mr. Packer and elected him. In 1851, Mr. Evans was elected State Senator from the district composed of Chester and Delaware Counties, and served with so much credit and satisfaction that he was renominated by the Whigs of Chester County at the expiration of his term, but apprehending that unless the "claims" of Delaware County were yielded to his party might lose the district, he withdrew. In 1854, Mr. Evans was a prominent candidate for the Whig nomination for Governor. Mr. Evans' name was withdrawn, as it afterwards proved, unadvisedly, as the Philadelphia delegation had resolved to cast its vote solidly for him on the next ballot, which would have nominated him. Governor Pollock selected Andrew G. Curtin, afterwards Governor, as his Secretary of the Commonwealth, intimating to Mr. Evans that if Mr. Curtin declined he should offer him the place. 

    While serving in the House and Senate, Mr. Evans distinguished himself as a most painstaking, industrious member. He was a member of several of the most important committees of both Houses, and was chairman of the House Committee on Printing and Education. While in this latter position he originated and framed the act that was passed by both Houses for the regulation of common schools in Pennsylvania. In the legislation for the sale of the public works he took a very prominent part. At the close of his Senatorial term he resumed his editorial work with his usual ardor, but his health, never very robust, began to fail, and in 1869 he took a trip to Europe. Returning much invigorated, he was again elected, in 1870, to the State Senate, this time from the district composed of Chester, Delaware, and Montgomery Counties. Before his term was half over he was taken sick, and died Feb. 9, 1872. Henry S. Evans was one of those remarkable men who are the products of American civilization. Like Horace Greeley and other well-known men, he began life a poor boy, gifted with only a slight public-school education, and by his own efforts raised himself to a prominent place as a journalist and as a public man. Like those gifted countrymen who had risen so high by their own exertions, he fell a victim to the demon overwork, dying at an age when English public men have hardly reached their prime. Remembering his own early struggles, Mr. Evans was ever ready to lend a helping hand to young people just starting in life, and a tale of suffering or trouble was sure to attract his sympathy and aid. As a citizen he took a prominent part in every public enterprise, and was called to fill numerous places of minor public trust: chief burgess of West Chester in 1861, guardian, trustee, etc. The high estimation in which he was held by the public made places in his office much sought after by the best class of young men, and he was very proud of his boys... His death came like a sudden blow, and the high regard in which he was held by his neighbors was attested by the universal expressions of sorrow at the news of his departure. No finger of suspicion was ever pointed at any public act of his, and his private life was equally without stain.

    Great-grandson Barton Darlington Evans (1845- ? ) was born on May 26, 1845. He wed Fannie Bemis ( ? - ? ). One daughter of the pair was Betty Evans, born in 1879.

    Great-grandson William Darlington Evans (1850- ? ) was born on May 13, 1850. He married Lucy Messersmith ( ? - ? ). Two sons of this union were Henry Sebastian Evans (born in 1883) and George M. Evans (1884).

    Great-granddaughter Catherine Lacey Evans ( ? - ? ) died at age five years.

    Great-granddaughter Henrietta Sebastian Evans (1855- ? ) was born on June 19, 1855. She was united in matrimony with Joseph E. Borden ( ? - ? ).

    Great-grandson Septimus Lacey Evans (1858-1894) was born on Dec. 11, 1858. The angel of death cleaved him away on Feb. 5, 1894, at the age of 35.

  • Grandson Palmeral Evans ( ? - ? ) -  nothing is known.
  • Grandson Samuel W. Evans ( ? -1878) was born on (?). He wed Rebecca Entrekin (Jan. 20, 1820-1908), daughter of William and Hannah (Howard) Entrekin, also spelled "Entrican." The eight known offspring in this brood were Anna Katherine "Kate" Evans, Howard B. Evans, John Henry Evans, Edward Penn Evans, Sarah Agnes Evans, Samuel Sebastian Evans, William Watson Evans and Ella Rebecca Evans. Rebecca "belonged to the Sharpless, Carpenteer and other prominent families of Delaware and Chester counties," said the Delaware County Daily Times. When the federal census enumeration was made in 1850, Samuel earned a living as a merchant, and the family resided in West Chester, Chester County, PA. That year, their 14-year-old nephew Henry Carruthers lived under their roof, as did 18-year-old Irish immigrant Jane Harrison. Death carried him off, in East Brandywine Township, on Nov. 15, 1878. The remains were lowered under the sod of Oaklands Cemetery in West Goshen Township. Rebecca outlived Samuel by three decades. Her final address was in Philadelphia at 2031 North 13th Street. Having become senile with dementia, she died in Philadelphia at the age of 88 on June 3, 1908. 

    Great-granddaughter Anna Katherine "Kate" Evans (1845-1924) was born on Jan. 27, 1845. She did not marry and devoted her life to teaching school. Burdened with heart disease, she succumbed to the spectre of death at age 79, in Montgomery Township, Montgomery County, on April 10, 1924. Burial was in Oaklands Cemetery, West Goshen Township. S.S. Adams of Media, PA was the informant for her official Pennsylvania certificate of death.

    Great-grandson Dr. Howard B. Evans (1846-1917) was born on June 18, 1846 and grew up in Chester, PA. He trained as a physician in young manhood. At the age of 30, still single, he and his brothers John Henry and Samuel boarded together under the roof of Edmond and Martha Hill in Philadelphia. He married Emma Gaston ( ? - ? ), but at the end of his life he was considered "single." Howard's final home was in Montgomery County. Just five days before his 71st birthday, and suffering from angina pectoris, he died in Eureka on June 13, 1917. Providing information for the death certificate was William W. Evans of North Wales, PA. Interment was in Oaklands Cemetery. A short death notice appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer.

    Great-grandson John Henry Evans (1848-1921) was born on March 30 or 31, 1848. He and his brother Edward both were baptized on March 14, 1852 in the Church of the Holy Trinity in West Chester, PA. He became a druggist in Philadelphia. As of 1880, at age 26, he and his unmarried brothers Samuel and Howard lived together, boarding in the Philadelphia home of Edmond and Martha Hill. In about 1887, he was joined in the bonds of holy wedlock with Sidney Jane Hoopes (Jan. 1853- ? ). They became the parents of an only son, Homer Hoopes Evans (1889-1979). The federal census of 1900 shows the couple in Media, Delaware County, PA with his continuing his profession as a druggist. John's fortunes turned, and by 1910 he was working as a railroad clerk in Media, while their son was employed as a clerk by a trust company. John was spirited away by death's angels at the age of 72 on Jan. 13, 1921. Burial was in Media's Cumberland Cemetery.

    Great-grandson Edward Penn Evans (1849-1880) was born on May 25, 1849 or 1850 in or near Chester County, PA. He and his older brother John both were baptized on March 14, 1852 in the Church of the Holy Trinity in West Chester, PA. The family was plunged into mourning when Edward died at the age of 30, on July 31, 1880, in East Brandywine Township, Chester County. His ashes sleep for all eternity in Oaklands Cemetery in West Goshen Township.

    Great-granddaughter Sarah Agnes Evans (1854- ? ) was born on Dec. 15, 1854. She did not marry. Sarah made a career as a bookkeeper. With her health failing due to heart valve insufficiency and chronic kidney disease, death carried her away at the age of 69 on April 8, 1924, in Montgomery County.

    Great-grandson Samuel Sebastian Evans Sr. (1857-1931) was born on March 14, 1857 in Chester County. in 1880, at the age of 23, he lived with his bachelor brothers John Henry and Howard in Philadelphia, boarding with Edmond and Martha Hill. From there he moved to Georgia. The federal census enumeration of 1900 shows hin Cedartown, Polk County, GA, renting a room in the house of Joseph Adamson, and working as a civil engineer. In about 1901, at the age of 44, he was married to Elizabeth Haldeman Miller (1869-1954). The bride was a dozen years younger than the groom, and a member of the Society of Friends. Although Samuel was not affiliated with the Friends, Elizabeth wished to retain her membership and her request was granted. Otherwise known as the "Providence Preparative Meeting," the Friends' roots began with early Quaker meetings in Upper and Lower Providence Townships. Two offspring of their union -- both born in Georgia -- were Dorothy Miller Seltzer and Samuel Sebastian Evans Jr. As of 1910, the Evanses' dwelling was in Cedartown, where he was employed as general manager of a cotton mill. They later returned to their home state, with an address of 223 North Monroe at the corner of Third Street in Media, Delaware County, PA. Samuel was considered by the Delaware County Daily Tmes as a "prominent citizen." Samuel then began his own membership in the Friends. For the last six years of his life, he suffered from chronic kidney problems which led to acute uremia, and he was confined to their residence for the last two years of his life. At the age of 73, he died in their home on Jan. 11, 1931. At his funeral service, Society of Friends leaders Emma Lippincott Higgins and Warren Tryon gave glowing eulogies. Burial was in the local Media Cemetery. The Daily Times said in an obituary that "There was a large gathering of relatives and friends in attendance and the floral offerings were numerous." Pallbearers included his son Sebastian Jr., son in law Charles Seltzer, Homer Hoopes Evans, Walter Durnall, William Watson Evans and William Pennock. Their son Samuel Jr. was a 1927 graduate of Cornell University. In 1929, the Seltzers lived in Rose Valley, Moylan and the Evanses in East Orange, NJ before moving to Merion Township near Philadelphia.

    Great-grandson William Watson Evans (1859-1931) was born on May 8, 1859. He was a lifelong bachelor, and a longtime farmer. In the early 1930s, he dwelled in Eureka, PA. Suffering from chronic heart disease, death swept him away four days after his 72nd birthday on May 12, 1931. A short funeral notice appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer. His sister Ella, also of Eureka, gave key information for the certificate of death.

    Great-granddaughter Ella Rebecca Evans (1865-1935) was born on Nov. 17, 1865 in Chester County. She remained single. In the mid-1930s, her dwelling-place was in North Wales, Media Borough, Delaware County. She was burdened with an irregular heartbeat toward the end. She suffered a heart attack at the age of 70 and died three days after Christmas 1935. Charles Seltzer of Moylan, PA was the informant for the death certificate.

  • Granddaughter Jemima Evans ( ? - ? ) was born in Pennsylvania. She is said to have been adopted by her uncle Abraham Piesch. She relocated to Illinois, settling in Lawrenceville, Lawrence County. There, she married an up-and-coming lawyer George W. Carruthers ( ? - ? ) of Lawrenceville. They were the parents of one known son, Henry W. Carruthers, born in 1835. Circa 1837, George advertised in the Illinois State Register that he was offering legal services at "Flack's" in Vandalia, IL. His last ad appeared on Oct. 27, 1837. Sadly, about that time, George died in Vandalia. The widowed Jemima and her young son returned to Pennsylvania. The son resided in the household of her brother Samuel W. Evans in 1850. Her fate is not known.

     
    Above, left: Capt. Henry W. Carruthers (History of the Ninety-seventh Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, During the War of the Rebellion, Philadelphia, 1875). Above right: the Fortress Monroe hospital where he died, and below, wounded soldiers arriving at the fort. 

    Oaklands Cemetery
    Courtesy Russ Dodge
    Great-grandson Henry W. Carruthers (1835-1864) was born on Nov. 5, 1835 in Lawrenceville, IL. His father died when Henry was a child, and he and his mother subsequently moved back to her home state of Ohio. In 1850, Henry resided with his uncle and aunt, Samuel W. and Rebecca Evans, in Chester, Chester County, PA. At the age of 14, he was apprenticed to his uncle, newspaper editor Henry Sebastian Evans of West Chester, PA, to learn the printing business. There, said the History of Chester County, Pennsylvania, by John Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, "he remained until he attained his twenty-first year, becoming an excellent printer and an efficient assistant in conducting the business of the office. At the end of his apprenticeship he entered upon the study of law with Joseph Hemphill, Esq., in West Chester ; was admitted to the bar of the courts of Chester and Delaware Counties in February, 1858, and practiced the law until the spring of 1861, when, the Rebellion having culminated in the attack upon Fort Sumter, he joined the ardent and patriotic young men of West Chester in raising troops to support the government." Previously a member of the National Guards, led by Henry R. Russ, he first joined the 9th Pennsylvania Infantry for a three-month term. He re-enlisted and was placed in the 97th Pennsylvania Infantry Volunteers on Sept. 11, 1861 and named adjutant of the regiment. Said the book Martial Deeds of Pennsylvania, by Samuel Penniman Bates, "During the siege of Forts Wagner and Gregg he had charge of the assignment and relief of working parties detailed from the brigade, a position of great peril and hardship, which he performed with singular success... Upon the transfer of the regiment to the Army of the James, his ability was even more apparent and his skill in more constant requisition. While in the Department of the South he had acted at intervals as Assistant Adjutant-General on the staff of Colonel Guss. He was afterwards offered this position on the staff of Colonel Bell; but he steadily declined it, preferring to remain with his old companions in arms. On the 6th of June, 1864, while in front of the enemy's works at Cold Harbor, he received his commission as Captain of Company C of his regiment." He is known to have taken part in battle at Deep Bottom and Malvern Hill, VA on Aug. 14-15, 1864, and at Strawberry Plains, VA on Aug. 16. He was shot at Strawberry Plains, with an enemy minié ball passing through his lumbar vertebras, severing the spinal cord and paralyzing his legs. He was carried off the field and sent to Chesapeake Hospital, at Fortress Monroe, VA. Said the history of his regiment, while in the hospital, "he received every attention which surgical skill could devise, but without avail; after suffering painfully and patiently several days, entirely sensible and resigned to his fate..." Sadly, just six days later, on Aug. 22, 1864, he surrendered to the spectre of death at age 29. Back home, his friends in the Chester County Bar "adopted resolutions lamenting his death," said the History, "and expressive of his great ability and brave loyalty, and added that he was the fifth martyr from its bar, and that it would fondly associate his name with the honored names of Bell, Roberts, Mclntire, and Nields, who had before given their lives to their country on the battle-field." Later, in 1875, he was profiled in an eight-page booklet, Biographical Sketch of Henry W. Carruthers, Esq., by Isaiah Price.

  • Henry's profile in Martial Deeds of Pennsylvania - Courtesy Google Books

  • Granddaughter Eliza Evans ( ? -1855) died in 1855.
  • Granddaughter Sarah Evans (1821-1897) was born on April 25, 1821. She was joined in wedlock with widower Rev. Dr. William Newton (1817-1893), an immigrant from Liverpool, England. His first wife, Mary Anne ( ? -1861), had died in 1861. Sarah and William do not appear to have reproduced. The pair resided on Union Street in West Chester. At one time, he served as rector of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the Nativity in Philadelphia. Later, on Dec. 30, 1877, said the Philadelphia Inquirer, he "startled the Protestant Episcopal world by the announcement of his withdrawal from that communion, followed by his entrance into the Reformed Episcopal Church, to which he had been in its inception an outspoken opponent." He was formally deposed from the ministry of the Protestalt Episcopal Churcy by the late Bishop Stevens, in April 1878." More than half of his former congregation followed him to the new church. Said the Inquirer, "Immediately after leaving the Church of the Nativity he reorganized the Reformed Episcopal Church of the Nativity in a hall at Tenth and Spring Garden streets, Philadelphia, where he remained for some years." This body of worshippers became Philadelphia's Church of the Covenant. His final charge was the Church of the Sure Foundation. Over the years, he authored books on religious and scientific topics as well as volumes of poems, among them Immortality and Other Poems, Human Life, The Morning Star and Other Poems and Gleanings from a Busy Life. Burdened with pneumonia, William died at the age of 75 on Feb. 16, 1893. Obituaries were published throughout the region. His grave marker bears this epitaph and scripture: "He departed this life in the full assurance of a blessed immortality... Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth: that they may rest from their labors and their works do follow them. Rev. XIV. 13." Sarah outlived her spouse by four years. She died in West Chester on Feb. 17, 1897. A notice of her death was printed in the Inquirer. Her remains sleep in the Oaklands Cemetery in West Goshen Township, Chester County. Inscribed on the face of her grave marker is the epitaph reading: "For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so, them also which sleep in Jesus, will God bring with Him."
   
The Newtons' graves, West Chester, PA - Courtesy "Carete"
  • Profile in the History of Chester County
    Courtesy Google Books
    Grandson Columbus Penn Evans (1824-1854) was born on Sept. 6, 1824. He was a man of public affairs during his short life and was profiled in the History of Chester County, Pennsylvania, by J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope (Philadelphia: Louis H. Everts, 1881).

    His father was of the Celtic race of ancient Britons, his mother of a respectable German family, and his training. from boyhood, among the Anglo-Saxons of Chester County. When about nine years old he lost his father, and while in his eleventh year his widowed mother, with several children, removed to West Chester, where, by her maternal care and excellent management, she raised and educated her younger children. At an early age Columbus was apprenticed to his brother, Henry S. Evans, to learn the printing business in the office of the Village Record, where he had for his associates such hopeful specimens of Young America as Bayard Taylor, Enos Prizer, of the Bucks County Intelligencer; George W. Vernon, of the Delaware Republican; Charles Cook, of the Danville Democrat; Hiram Brower, of the Fairfax (Va.) News; and Frederick E. Foster, of the Pittsburgh Chronicle. In January, 1844, young Evans, then in his twentieth year, aspired to the editorial position, and removed to Wilmington, Del., where, with his friend, G. W. Vernon, as a partner, he took charge of the Republican newspaper. After a residence of two or three years he was recognized as worthy to be grouped with the famous "Blue Hen's Chickens" of the war of independence, and accordingly, in the contest with Mexico, he was commissioned a second lieutenant in the spring of 1847, was promoted to a first lieutenantcy in February, 1848, and in the same year received the brevet of captain, to rank from Aug. 20, 1847, "for gallant and meritorious conduct in the battles of Contreras and Cherubusco." He served in the 11th Regiment of U. S. Infantry, in Gen. Cadwallader's brigade. At Molino Del Rey, where the Mexicans were defeated by one-fourth their number of Americans, Lieut. Evans was in the front rank. When the storming-party rushed in to take possession of that dearly-earned position, where so many of his comrades had fallen. he was the second man to enter the work, and received the sword of a Mexican officer. At Chapultepec he led his own and another company, and again received the commendation of his commander. He also held the responsible position of quartermaster of the regiment after the surrender of the city of the Montezumas, and returned, in charge of his company, to New York in August, 1848. He quietly returned to his printing-office in Wilmington, and resumed his editorial employments. Capt. Evans, on Feb. 20, 1849, was presented by the Legislature of his adopted State with a handsome sword, accompanied by a letter from Governor Tharp,-honorable testimonies of his services in the war with Mexico. In 1851 he was elected mayor of the city of Wilmington; but in 1852 he declined a re-election, preferring the quiet of private life to the annoyances of official station. age. In the winter of 1853-54 he was attacked by pulmonary consumption, and died at the residence of his sisters, in West Chester, Feb. 19, 1854, in the thirtieth year of his February 22d he was buried with military honors by the National Guards of Chester County. His remains repose in Oaklands Cemetery, near West Chester, where an appropriate memorial, in the form of a pyramidal column, has been erected by his devoted family.

    Above: ironclad deck and gun turret of the Civil War gunship 'Monitor' built of steel rolled by Charles E. Pennock's firm in Coatesville, PA. Below: in its epic battle with the Confederate 'Merrimac.'  Library of Congress.
  • Charles' obituary, Iron Age - Courtesy Google Books
    Granddaughter Mary Baker Evans (1827-1911) was born on July 26, 1827 in Bucks County, near Jenkintown. When she was 27 or 28 years of age, in 1855, she entered into marriage with Charles E. Pennock (Aug. 30, 1825-1918) of Coatesville, the son of William and Mary Pennock. Research suggests that they produced five children -- William Pennock, Katharine H. Pennock, Marion Pennock, Florence J. Martin and Charles A. Pennock. Charles made a living as an iron and steel manufacturer, operating the Valley Iron Works in Coatesville built by his father in 1837. The business also operated the Mainville Force in Columbia County. Charles was acknowledged as having produced the steel plate used on the famed ironclad ship, the Monitor, which defeated the enemy Merrimac in battle during the Civil War. His career was summarized by Iron Age, the bible of the industry:

    He was the last of the pioneer ironmasters of Chester County, Pa. He began his business career with his father, William Pennock, at the old Pine Grove Works on the Octoraro Creek, in Lancaster county, was employed later at the Laurel Iron Works, and in 1853 with his brother, Joseph, purchased the Falley Iron Works property on the Brandywine Creek, one mile north of Coatesville, a small mill operated by water power. There they continued the manufacture of iron plates under the firm name of C. E. Pennock & Co., until 1887, making a special grade of charcoal flange iron, well known in the trade as the "Eureka" brand. In that mill were rolled the iron plates which clad the U. S. gunboat Monitor for the famous fight with the Merrimac at Hampton Roads in the Civil War. This mill was later rebuilt and enlarged for steam power, also three other mills constructed, one having rolls 110 in. wide, being the largest mill in the country at that time for the rolling of iron plates. These works are at present part of the extensive plant of the Midvale Steel & Ordnance Co., Coatesville. He was a staunch Republican all his life. He possessed to a remarkable degree at the time of his death his mental qualities and took deep interest in the vast development of the iron and steel industry of the present day. 

    The Pennock firm continued to operate all through the nation's financial panic of 1873 and ran continuously for another 14 years, churning out tons of steel plate used for the construction of boilers. As of 1876, the Valley works contained four double puddling furnaces, four heating furnaces, a four-ton steam hammer, and four trains of rolls (one 18, one 24, and two 30-inch), with an annual capacity of producing 7,000 net tons of plate steel. The Mainville works produced charcoal blooms, utilizing one hammer, three forge fires and one runout, with an annual capacity of 800 net tons. By the 1880s, the company fell on hard times as it sruggled to continue operating. In 1886, the Valley works puddlers went on strike seeking a 20 percent wage hike. They stayed out for five weeks before the company agreed to a compromise increase of 10 percent. Other of the company laborers struck that fall. A year later, in May 1887, facing large debts to a number of creditors, the business shut down for an indefinite period of time. Company president John Pennock told news reporters that the closure "was entirely due to want of orders and attributed it to the workings of the new law." Among them were commission merchant A.R. McHenry & Co., of Philadelphia, which held a note of  nearly $3,500 and Robert Hare Powell & Co., a pig-iron manufacturer and bituminous coal ming and shipping concern, for more than $200,000. The Powell company responded by assigning the debt to the Guarantee Trust and Safe Deposit Company. Pennock appears to have remained close for good, and bankruptcy  declared, and headlines blared "The Big Iron Failure" in the Lancaster newspapers. In December 1887, Guarantee Trust tried to sell the Pennock assets, but were prevented by a court injunction brought by Provident Life and Trust Company of Philadelphia. At some point, the sale of property proceeded. The Lancaster Semi-Weekly New Era summarized in June 1888 that the "Pennocks got in heavily on a number of banks and claimed that they had been extensively trading paper with Powell & Co. Powell & Co. denied this and claimed they had been carrying Pennock & Co.'s paper for three years out of pure friendship. Previous to their failure the Pennocks were highly respected. They had been in business at Coatesville for thirty years and did a business of over a half-million dollars yearly. Their weekly pay-roll was $1,900." The auditor working through the bankruptcy n July 1889 tallied assets of $88,650 and debts of $420,798. The old Valley works were dormant until about 1901, when a Philadelphia-based investor group applied to charter the Coatesville Iron and Steel Company, with plans to rebuild and operate the mills. The group included William W. Kurtz, William B. Kurtz, Henry K. Kurtz, Elwood W. Porter and William Drost.

    How Mary and Charles got through this crisis is not known. Their home address in their later years was 78 South First Avenue. At the age of 83, suffering from fatty degeneration of the heart and kidney problems, Mary died on Jan. 31, 1911 in Coatesville. The Philadelphia Inquirer printed a short funeral notice. Burial was in Fairview Cemetery, with H.C. Ford of Coatesville providing details for the Pennsylvania certificate of death. Charles remained in their residence for the balance of his years. After suffering a heat stroke at age 92, and already burdened with "senile exhaustion," he died on Aug. 7, 1918. The Reading (PA) Times said he had passed away at the Pennock homestead, and a brief funeral notice was published in the Philadelphia Inquirer. Another obituary, in the Camden (NJ) Morning Post, said that "If he retained his faculties he could remember the days in which steam men-of-war were looked on by many excellent seamen as impracticable." There is no evidence to suggest a close family connection with Major League Baseball pitcher Herb Pennock, son of Theodore and Mary Louise (Sharp) Pennock, of Kennett Square, Chester County, who pitched for the Philadelphia Athletics, Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees..

    Great-grandson William Pennock (1856-1935) was born on March 11, 1856. He was employed by his father's firm in young manhood and was intimately involved with managing through its insolvency at the end. In 1887, he wed Clara A. McClure (1858-1943). They resided in the 1930s in Lyndell, East Brandywine Township. At the age of 78, suffering from acute heart degeneration, hypertension and hardening of the arteries, he died on Jan. 16, 1935. Interment was in Brandywine Manor, known today as the Forks of the Brandywine Presbyterian Cemetery in Glenmoore.

    Great-granddaughter Katharine H. Pennock (1860-1943) was born on June 6, 1857 in Coatesville, Chester County. She did not marry but remained in the community for life. Census records for the year 1900 show her under her parents' roof with no occupation. Her address in 1943 was 78 South First Avenue. Having been stricken with a pulmonary embolism, suddenly, she died at the age of 86 on Oct. 23, 1943. Interment was in Fairview Cemetery, Coatesville. Her funeral notice in the Philadelphia Inquirer asked mourners to omit sending flowers. Her death certificate stated her occupation as ""Lady."

    Great-granddaughter Marion A. Pennock (1860-1943) was born two days before Christmas 1860. She never married. Marion made her longtime dwelling-place in Coatesville, Chester County. In 1900, when the U.S. Census was taken, she earned a living as a school teacher and dwelled with her parents. For the last 20 years of her life, she was burdened with heart disease, including endocarditis, an inflammatin of the heart's inner lining. Her final address was 78 South First Avenue. After suffering a cerebral embolism, the spectre of death cleaved her away in Coatesville on St. Patrick's Day 1943. The Philadelphia Inquirer printed a brief funeral notice. As with her sister Katharine, who died seven months later, her occupation as listed on the death certificate was "Lady." Her remains were lowered into repose in Fairview Cemetery.

    Great-granddaughter Florence J. Pennock (1864-1947) was born on Feb. 11, 1864 or 1865 in Coatesville. She entered into marriage with Edwin H. Martin ( ? - ? ). They lived in Coatesville at the address of 349 East Lincoln Highway. She passed into the arms of the angelic host at the age of 82 on Oct. 1, 1947 from the effects of heart disease and hypertension followed by a cerebral embolism. Burial was in Fairview Cemetery, Chester County, with Mrs. Steward L. Huston providing vital details for the Pennsylvania certificate of death.

    Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Belgium
    Courtesy Des Philippet
    Great-grandson Charles Augustus Pennock (1869-1930) was born in Aug. 1869 or 1870. When he was 29 years of age, and still a bachelor, he lived with his parents and was a clerk for a rolling mill in Coatesville. During the decade leading up to 1910, he moved to the state capitol of Harrisburg and was employed as a steel mill foreman, boarding in 1910 in the hotel of Albert and Salone Koenig. Then on Nov. 25, 1919, in Chicago, the 49-year-old Charles tied the marital knot with 30-year-old Nellie Rebecca Weber (1889-1974) who was 20 years younger than he. Two sons of this family were Charles Edwin Pennock and William W. Pennock. They moved to Baltimore, MD, where in 1920 he worked as superintendent of a tin plate company. Their home was located at 2711 Elsinore Avenue at the corner of Carlisle Avenue in the city's Forest Park section. Charles died suddenly in Baltimore at the age of 59 on Jan. 27, 1930. Burial was in Woodlawn Cemetery. A brief funeral notice appeared in the Baltimore Sun. Nellie outlived her spouse by 44 years. She married again to Alfred H. Hobson ( ? -1953). She was plunged into grief when her son William, a 1942 graduate of McDonogh School, and private with the 60th Infantry, 9th Division of the U.S. Army, was killed in action in western Germany during World War II on March 10, 1945. His remains were lowered into honored sleep in Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial in Liège, Belgium. Back home, a memorial service was held in the Augsburg Evangelical Lutheran Church. Nellie later moved to Oregon where her son Charles was living. She died in Portland on April 20, 1974.

Son Henry Haupt ( ? -1818) was born on (?). He is said to have relocated to Alabama and died unmarried in the fall of 1818. Nothing more about him has been located on the paper research trail.

Daughter Elisabeth Haupt (1792-1852) was born on Oct. 11, 1792 or 1794. She was joined in wedlock with Dr. Ezra Baker Jr. (Dec. 23, 1794-1870), a native of Williamstown, MA who was living in Philadelphia. He was the son of Ezra and Sarah (Tucker) Baker Sr. and the grandson of Elisa Baker, a member of the convention that framed the terms of the Massachusetts constitution. In about 1820, they moved with her brother Abraham to Illinois and settled on a farm near Gard's Point, about eight miles northwest of Mt. Carmel, Wabash County. They then moved to a farm at Cabbage Corners and built a brick house. The Bakers became the parents of six -- Ezra Haupt Baker, Edwin Sebastian Baker, Barton Piesch Baker, Dorsey Syng Baker, Ruth Eliza Baker and Sarah Elizabeth Boyer. Ezra is known to have operated a store at Centerville, IL in 1824 and perhaps added a second store in Mount Carmel, employing Beauchamp Harvey as his manager. He became licensed to practice medicine in 1825 by the Medical Society of Illinois. In 1819, he established a castor-oil mill which he operated in Mount Carmel until 1849, handing the business to his his son Barton who continued it for decades. Ezra also bought what was considered the best steamboat in the nation. He was named as a director of the new Mount Carmel branch of the State Bank of Illinois in 1836. He appears to have been authorized to erect a mill dam near Coffee Island across the Little Wabash in 1838. That same year, 1838, he bought a heavy log house and blockhouse from Augustus Lovelette in Rochester, IL. A year later, in 1839, he laid out the town of Coffee Island, later named Rochester, in the northeast quarter of Section 14, Township 2, South Range 13 West. In this new community he built a flour mill, carding mill and saw mill "and was prime mover in every enterprise, when George Legier went in as partner, and the business became known as Baker & Legier," said the Mount Carmel Daily Republican-Register. Rochester's history, said the 1883 book,  Combined History of Edwards, Lawrence and Wabash Counties, Illinois, "has been a very eventful one. It has twice risen to prominence and as often sunk into decay and obscurity. It was the scene of one of the first two settlements made in Wabash county, and the place of the first negotiations in trade between the white man and the Indian." According to the History, Ezra was:

...wealthy, of fine appearance, sociable and pleasing in his manners and address. He was the leading spirit of old Centereville, the founder of Rochester, that at one time surpassed Mt. Carmel in business importance, and the proprietor of Bennington in Edwards county. His life may serve as an example and a warning to the young of Wabash county: First, prosperity,, and over-reaching in business speculations, then domestic infelicity, and finally the cup to excess, and poverty and pauperism in Philadelphia.

The federal census enumeration of 1850 shows the Bakers in Wabash County, with Ezra employed as a physician. Daughter Sarah, age 23, and Frances Ellaine, age 6, were living in the household at that time. Elisabeth died in Illinois at the age of 59 on March 26, 1852. Ezra outlived his bride by perhaps 28 years. After four years alone, he wed again on Dec. 10, 1856 to his wife's niece, Catherine "Kate" Haupt (1819-1908), daughter of Abraham and Catherine (Von Billiard) Haupt. Their wedding is said to have taken place in Reading, Berks County. They moved back to Mount Carmel, until their marriage dissolved and he moved back to Pennsylvania. There is some evidence to suggest that at some point, in a dispute involving Ezra and (?) Biggs, attorney Henry Eddy endorsed some kind of statement in which President Abraham Lincoln may have written a letter of some type. Another book, a historical biographical encylopedia of Illinois, said of Ezra that "In after years, reckless speculation dissipated his splendid fortune, domestic discord shattered his dreams of happiness, convivial excesses undermined his health, and his troubled days were closed in that dread above of Charity, the almshouse." Ezra's final residence was at 19 South Fifth Street, Philadelphia. He died in the City of Brotherly Love on May 12, 1870, at the age of 75. A physician ruled that death was due to "softening of brain." Burial was in Woodlands Cemetery in the city. As his passing, his son Edwin took over the firm and sold his share of it to his business partner Legier. Former wife Kate remained in Illinois. At her death at age 89 on Nov. 8, 1908, her remains were laid to rest in the Baker Family Cemetery in Gard's Point, Wabash County.

  • Grandson Ezra Haupt Baker (1816-1882) was born on June 23, 1816 in New Jersey. When a young man, he migrated cross-country to Iowa and put down roots in Marion County, IA. There, census records for 1850 show him working as a merchant. He tied the marital knot with Emily Salina Serry/Serrie (1825- ? ), an immigrant from Ireland. They were the parents of two daughters, Sarah Elizabeth Simpson and Emily K. Baker. The family made its residence in Marion County in the 1860s and by 1870 had moved to Mount Prairie, Jasper County, IA where he was a dry goods merchant. The family relocated by 1880 to Washington, Jasper County, with him having no occupation as of 1880. He died in Vandalia, Fayette County, IL on Sept. 25, 1882. The remains were transported back to Iowa for burial in Colfax Cemetery in Jasper County. No newspaper obituary has been located for him.

    Great-granddaughter Sarah Elizabeth Baker (1865-1928) was born on Oct. 20, 1865 in Marion County, IA. Her home in 1880 was with her parents in Washington, Jasper County, IA and then in 1900 in Colfax, IA. On May 19, 1900, when she was 36 years of age, she married 41-year-old Morgan Valley farmer Garrison W. Simpson (Feb. 28, 1860-1931), son of William P. and Emily (Pritchard) Simpson of Marion County. The nuptials were held in Des Moines, Polk County, IA, by the hand of justice of the peace John Halloran. They did not reproduce. Federal census records for 1900 show the newlyweds on a farm in Perry, Marion County. By 1910, they had moved to Garfield, Calhoun County, IA, with Garfield earning a living as a farm laborer. Later, in 1920, the pair dwelled on a farm in Sac City, Sac County, IA and by 1928 in Grant City, Sac County, IA. Sadly, having contracted stomach cancer and then suffering a stroke of apoplexy, she died at the age of 62 on April 14, 1928. Burial was in Oak Lawn Cemetery in Auburn, IA. Garrison only lived for another three years. He endured hardening of the arteries and was felled by a heart attack, passing away on Nov. 8, 1931. James Simpson of Grant City, IA was the informant for Garrison's death certificate.

    Great-granddaughter Emily K. Baker (1866- ? ) was born in about 1866 in Iowa.  

  • Grandson Edwin Sebastian Baker (1818-1901) was born on Nov. 5, 1818 in Philadelphia or more likely across the river in New Jersey. He migrated to Illinois with his parents in 1820, when he was about two years of age. He married Virginia Kitchell (Sept. 15, 1824-1903). The 11 children in this family were Zarina S. "Rena" Baker, Kaleida Price, Howard K. Baker, Mary Fedelia Hodge, Orrie T. Baker, Carroll Baker, Septina "Tina" Baker, Octavia Baker, Frances E. Baker, Ethan Allen Baker and Levina "Vina" Hill Porter. Grief cascaded over the family when son Orrie died at birth in 1851. Edwin took over his father's store in Centerville and then sold his share to his father's partner, George Legier. In 1860, the Bakers' dwelling-place was in Charleston, Coles County, IL, where he was engaged in manufacturing plows. Federal census records for 1870 show the brood in Tuscola, Douglas County, IL, with Edwin generating a living as a farmer. The Bakers moved to a farm near Cherryvale, KS in 1881 with plans to build the finest and best house in town. Heartbreak struck in 1898, when a house occupied by their son Carroll and family was destroyed by fire. As of 1901, he owned severeal farms and a house at the corner of Wilson and Third in Cherryvale. At the age of 82, Edwin passed away on Jan. 13, 1901. An obituary in the Cherryvale Daily News said he "had only been ailing about three days, and his death was unexpected... Rev. A.L. Barker, an old friend of the family, in choice words over the remains, told of his exemplary life, and many virtues." A brief notice was printed in the Coffeyville (KS) Record. Interment was in Fairview Cemetery in Cherryvale. Virginia only outlived her husband by two-and-a-half years and lived during that time on East Third Street. In poor health, from congestive heart failure, she traveled to Milwaukee in the fall of 1902 and stay with her daughter Frances. But having markedly improved, she returned home to Cherryvale in February 1903. But she went downhill again and the Cherryvale Daily News reported in early June 1903 that "Mrs. Virginia Baker, an old lady 78 years old, is very low at her home on East 3rd. street." She died on June 11, 1903, having been bedfast for some four to six weeks. Rev. A.M. Baker led the funeral services, held in the family residence.

    Great-granddaughter Zarina "Rena" Baker (1845-1912) was born in 1845. She appears not to have married but to have maintained a socially active life. She made news in the gossip columns of the Cherryvale (KS) Champion when taking the train to Topeka to see her aunt, Mrs. M.S. Kitchell for "a long visit." Zarina's address in 1908 was 302 East Third Street, Cherryvale. Her name again was in the news across the state in June 1908 when discovering the body in her yard of local man Archibald Warren, who had committed suicide by cutting his own throat. It took months for the buzz to settle. Then in May 1909, she left on the Frisco Railroad for a three-month visit with family and friends in Los Angeles and then a sister in Redlands, CA. Upon her return, she traveled to Independence to see her brother H.K. Baker. In a turn of fate, she suffered a mental collapse in June 1911 and suffered terribly, receiving care from her sisters-in-law Mrs. Carrol Baker and Mrs Howard Baker. Several days later, the Cherryvale Republican said she was "lying in a dazed condition" and may have been a victim of a fall. "It is thought from the position of some of the furniture that she fell just as she entered the door stricking [sic] her chest on a chairand her head on a lounge. Her head and chest are badly bruised and a gash cut on her nose. Wednesday she was able to walk to the home of Mrs. Bert Foval who summoned assistance. Miss Baker is still too dazed to talk coherently enough to tell just what was the cause of her injuries... Judging from the way the house was ransacked, Miss Baker may be the victim of foul play or she might have suffered a temporary collapse." As time went on, and her mind remained unsound, she was appointed a guardian, Herman S. Baker. She then was admitted to resided in a sanitarium in Parsons, remaining for the last year of her life. The angel of death mercifully harvested her away in Aug. 1912 at the age of 66. The body was brought from Parsons to Cherryvale for funeral rites and burial. An obituary was printed in the Republican.

    Great-grandson Howard K. Baker (1848-1926) was born in about 1848 in Illinois. He was joined in wedlock with Mira Jane Orth (1849-1938) and settled in Jerrson, IL in 1903 and at Tuscola, IL. Four children were born to this couple -- the three known names were Orth Kitchell Baker (1876-1926), Roy Garfield Baker (1880-1914) and Oscar H. Baker (1885-1968). Their home in 1912 was in Independence, KS. Howard died in 1926 and was laid to rest in Mount Hope Cemetery in Independence. Their son Roy was employed as principal of the McKinley School in Cherryvale circa 1907 and then accepted a position as bookkeepeer with the Garden City Sugar Beet Company..

    Great-grandchild Kaleida Kitchell Baker (1849- ? ) was born on June 1, 1849 in Illinois. She wed John Wesley "J.W." Price (1844-1914). The Prices at one time lived in Bedford, IA. They were the parents of five, including Archie Preston Price (1878-1926) and Kenneth Kitchell Price (1895-1899). As of 1895, the family was in Long Island, NY. Kaleida is known to have been in Wyoming Territory in 1901. Sadly,she died at the age of 54 on June 27, 1903. Her remains were laid to rest in Whaley Cemetery in Greybull, Big Horn County, WY. Her upright grave marker is topped with a carving of an open Bible. The widowed John Wesley is said to have died in Canada in 1914. Their son Archie died in Portland, OR at age 48 on July 30, 1926.

    Great-granddaughter Mary Fedelia/Finlia Baker ( ? - ? ) married L.F. Hodge ( ? - ? ). They put down roots in Montecello, IL and had one child. She was deceased by 1912.

    Great-grandson Carroll Baker (1854-1914) was born on June 17, 1854 in Mount Carmel, IL and grew up in Tuscola, IL. He received his higher education at the University of Illinois. On Valentine's Day 1880, he was married to Ada Gibbs (Feb. 14, 1857-1925) and they became the parents of nine -- Herman Sebastian Baker, Julia M. Alder, Stanley Bushnell Baker, Lily Baker, Ira William Baker, Dr. Paul K. Baker and Ralph Baker plus one who died young. The newlyweds first settled near Cherryvale, KS. In February 1898, occupying a farmhouse owned by Carroll's father in Cherryvale, they escaped injury but lost most of their household goods in a fire which destroyed the structure. They built a new house in February 1898 and dwelled three miles west of Cherryvale in 1912. At their 30th wedding anniversary in February 1910, family and friends threw a surprise party. "All brought well filled basket, arriving just at the noon hour," said the Cherryvale Journal. "The afternoon was spent with music and singing." In 1913, Carroll and Lily spent three months in California, Washington State and Canada before returning home that August. Later in 1913, they moved to Manhattan, KS where several of the children were enrolled in school. Sadly, while helping a friend in hay season on Aug. 13, 1914, Carroll fell from a stack and his spinal cord was severed, rendering his entire body paralyzed. His brother Howard and cousin W.W. Kitchell of Topeka came to his side. He never recovered and died at home on Oct. 21, 1914. An obituary in the Journal said that he "by his worthy character made many friends who mourn his loss. He was a strong noble citizen and loving husband and kind father." At the time of Carroll's passing, son Herman dwelled near Cherryvale, son Stanley was employed by the Garden City Sugar and Land Company, daughter Lily taught in Manhattan High School and Julia, Ira, Paul and Ralph attended the Kansas State Agricultural College in Manhattan. Ada lived for another 11 years and passed away on Feb. 28, 1925.

    Great-granddaughter Septina "Tina" Baker (1857-1927) was born in April 1857 in Illinois. She did not marry. Septina relocated to California in young womanhood and in 1900-1912 was in Oakland, Alameda County, CA. In 1900, at the age of 43, her occupation was teaching, and she boarded in the household of Rosa O'Clift. Census records for her in 1910 show her living in her own residence on Grove Street in Oakland and working as a "pracitioner" of Christian Science. She is known to have written an article for the San Francisco Journal, published in Nov. 1921 under the headlines "Child Bible Story: 'Frogs, Frogs, Frogs'!" She and others formed the California Home School in 1926, a prepatory school in Oakland. Then in 1927, she was named in Oakland Tribune advertisement for having authored a California Press book, Life of Our Master, Christ Jesus, was described as "Undenominational; illustrated; artistic; loved by 'the common people' -- by children, youth and senior friends." Death spirited her away at the age of 68 on Nov. 28, 1927. The Oakland Post Enquirer said in an obituary that she was a "Christian Science practitioner" and survived by her sister Frances E. Baker.

    Great-granddaughter Octavia Baker (1859- ? ) was born in about 1859 in Illinois. She was deceased by 1912.

    Great-granddaughter Frances/Frincea E. Baker (1862- ? ) was born in about 1862 in Illinois. She was unmarried and residing in Wakasha, WI in 1901 and is known to have traveled to Cherryvale, KS in January 1901 for her father's funeral. She returned to Cherryvale in the winter of 1903 to see her widowed mother. Frances remained in Milwaukee in 1912.

    Great-grandson Ethan Allen Baker ( ? - ? ) was deceased by 1912.

    Great-granddaughter Levina "Vina" Baker (1863-1922) was born on Sept. 23, 1863 in Tuscola, IL. She grew to womanhood in Cherryvale, KS. As a young woman, from 1883 to 1885, she attended the Philadelphia School of Design for Women. She also studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 1885. Among her works of art, in the Western genre, were "Horse Head" - "The Orange Girl" - and "Cow's Head" - all displayed at the Mechanics Institute Fair in San Francisco in 1889. Follow-on paintings included "Lilacs" (1893) and "Under the Oaks" and "Portrait" (1894) - "Indian Child with Spindle Whorl" - "Indian Papoose" - "Yosemite" - "Squaw with Papoose" - "Squaw Making Basket" - "Indian Girl with Doll" - and "On the Trail," featuring a scene of two camping miner. Levina was twice-wed. She was an artist as was her first spouse, Edward Rufus Hill (1851-1908). Their nuptials were held in 1902 in Oakland, Alameda County, CA. Together, they produced a son and daughter, Rowland K. Hill and Virginia Hill. Sadly, Edward died in 1908. Levina supported herself as a widow by teaching school in Vacaville and Boulder Creek, CA and maintaining a residence in Ben Lomond, CA. Later, in 1921, she married farmer Warner O. Porter ( ? - ? ). Toward the end, she resided in a sanitarium near Boulder Creek, Santa Cruz County, CA. A newspaper reported that  she "was brought down from the mountain town yesterday in a serious condition and here death occurred a few hours afterward," on March 24, 1922, at the age of 59. Her artworks today are preserved in the San Mateo Historical Society Museum, Society of California Pioneers and and Athenian Nile Club of Oakland. She is profiled in the 2015 book, Emerging from the Shadows, Vol. II: A Survey of Women Artists Working in California, 1860-1960 (Emerging from the Shadows, 2). 

  • Grandson Barton Piesch "B.P." Baker (1821-1894) was born on Sept. 19, 1821 in Pennsylvania, possibly in Philadelphia. His middle name came from an aunt and uncle, Sarah and Abraham Piesch. He migrated to Illinois in infancy with his parents. Barton was joined in wedlock with Lucretia Kitchell (Nov. 30, 1841-1894). The Baker and Kitchell families were close, and Barton's brother Edwin wed Lucretia's sister Virginia. Together, the Bakers produced four offspring, perhaps all during their years in Illinois -- Elizabeth Thorne, Ella Ridgeway, Iola Campbell and Barton Baker. Barton earned a living in the business of castor oil. He owned an oil press franchise or agency and made news in 1882 when traveling to see his brother Edwin in Cherryvale, KS, hoping to find buyers for his technology. Said the Cherryvale (KS) Globe and Torch, he "can instruct any purchaser exactly how to manufacture and clarify the best of oil -- for he has been in the business since 1849 and succeeded his father in that business, who had been so engaged from 1819 to 1849 in Mount Carmel, Ills. It is to be hoped that some party in Cherryvale, will now take hold of this enteerprise and not let all the castor beans be shipped out of the country unmanufactured." The family eventually relocated to Walla Walla, WA. Wife and husband died two days apart in 1894 -- her on Jan. 13 and him on Jan. 15. Interment of the remains was in Oak Grove Cemetry in Hillsboro, IL.

    Great-granddaughter Elizabeth Baker tied the knot with William Thorne ( ? - ? ). They made a home in Olney, IL.

    Great-granddaughter Ella Baker (1856- ? ) was born in 1856. She was united in matrimony with Charles W. Ridgeway ( ? - ? ). Evidence suggests that the pair dwelled in Mount Carmel, IL.

    Great-granddaughter Iola Baker (1857-1925) -- sometimes known as "Viola" -- was born on Aug. 31, 1857. She entered into marriage with William Alexander Campbell (1851-1924) of Olney, IL. One known son of this union was William Lloyd Campbell. At the age of 67, Iola died in Spokane on June 4, 1925. The remains were laid to rest in Walla Walla's Mountain View Cemetery. 

    Great-grandson Barton Baker (1860- ? ) was born in 1860.

  • Dr. Dorsey Syng Baker - Courtesy R. Hale
    Grandson Dorsey Syng Baker (1823-1888) was born on Oct. 18, 1823 in Illinois. He obtained a degree in 1845 from Jefferson Medical College at Philadelphia, in his mother's' home state, and then practiced medicine for three years in the Midwest. He was thrice-wed and the father of an astonishing 15 offspring. His first spouse was Caroline Tibbitts ( ? -1863). Their seven children were Edward Franklin Baker, Mary Elizabeth Moore, Eva Rosaline Baker, Ezra Baker, William Baker, Henry Clay Dorsey Baker and William W. Baker. They grieved when children Eva, Ezra and William all died within a week of their births. Sadly, Caroline passed away at the age of 29  on June 22, 1863. His second bride was Mary Legier ( ? -1865). They did not reproduce. Sadly, she died after a relatively brief marriage, in Oct. 1865, rendering him as a two-time widower. His third wife was Elizabeth H. McCullough (Oct. 30, 1840- ? ). The eight children from the third marriage, all daughters, were Ida "Mabel" Anderson, Anna Amelia Baker, Henrietta Frances Baker, Laura Belle Baker, Lillian Haupt Baker, Blanche Elizabeth Baker, Ada Louise Baker and Rosaline Imogene Baker. The spectre of death spirited away daughters Henrietta, Laura, Lillian and Blanche within a year of each other in 1877-1878.

    In the spring of 1848, he heeded Horace Greeley's advice to “Go west, young man” and traveled to Oregon, arriving in the late fall. Along the way, he traveled on horseback and provided medical care for his fellow migrants. During the Gold Rush, he twice went to California to seek his fortune, but in time came back to Douglas County, OR, constructing the first flour mill in the southern part of the state. He opened a merchant business in Portland in 1858 and in his advertising offered to share half of his net profits to all customers who paid cash. He also saw opportunity to make money in the business of navigation on the Columbia River, investing in the steamers E. D. Baker and the Spray, and acquiring Northwest which had routes on the upper Columbia and Snake Rivers. He eventually sold all of these vessels to the Oregon Steam Navigation Company. In 1859, he opened another mercantile store at Walla Walla, moving there 1861 and remaining for good. After eight years of accumulating capital, he and his brother-in-law John Franklin Boyer in 1869 established the first bank in Washington Territory, which later was named the Baker-Boyer National Bank.

    Among his top accomplishments was building the 32-mile Walla Walla and Columbia River Railroad to link the little town of Walla Walla with shipping connections on the Columbia River. As early as 1862, during the Civil War, Dorsey took part in community discussions over the need for rail service in and out of Walla Walla and was one of 30 prominent citizens to sign a charter to incorporate an organization for this purpose. As in many things, there was no clear direction on how to obtain financing, and the proposal failed. Another incorporation effort in 1868 similarly led to nothing of substance. What changed, however, was an opportunity in 1869-1871 for the County of Walla Walla to issue $300,000 in bonds. Dorsey made house-to-house visits to rural voters to lobby for passing the enabling legislation. But the effort went nowhere. He then decided to build the road using his own capital and resources. He sent agents to the Yakima River in Washington the Clearwater River in Idaho to identify sources of construction timber and authorized preliminary surveys of the potential right-of-way for the rail line.

    Then in December 1871, he and Elizabeth and baby traveled by rail and stagecoach to New York via the Union Pacific at Kelton, UT. The trip included a stop in Pittsburgh, where he bought a locomotive at a cost of $4,400. The 7.5-ton engine was transported via a steamship to Wallula, WA, around the tip of South America’s Cape Horn, arriving in June 1872. Now with much-more tangible evidence of his seriousness, he tried to enlist other investors and issued stock, with mixed results. In time he bought out all of his partners. His son W.W. Baker later wrote, “Thus it appears that practically the whole burden of financing the building of the road fell upon one man.” In his role as president of the company, Dorsey was paid in stock. As work begun on physical construction, he visited the worksite at least twice weekly to make sure his funds were being spent effectively and efficiently.

    Walla Walla at that time was not well-developed. One report says that in 1874, its farmers exported only 134,000 bushels of grain produced by 5,000 acres of land. Dorsey’s Baker and Boyer Bank, the only one in the Territory, only had capital and surplus of $120,000. Wrote son W.W., “The supplying of necessary funds to meet expenditures soon began to assume a serious aspect as one stockholder after another, losing faith, sold his stock.” A bond issue backed by mortgages failed. A sale of treasury stock did not work either. Dorsey personally paid for a shipment of steel from England for 20 miles of rails, at a cost of $65,000, when he found the company in more debt than permitted by its by-laws.

    Dorsey asked Walla Walla citizens to invest $75,000 in company stock, which was turned down by a five-member committee of the community. “Certainly this showed a lack of confidence in the success of the enterprise,” wrote W.W. Baker, “or the stock was not considered good from an investment point of view.” But the five men voluntarily offered to pay a subsidy in response to the cash call. In the final deal, the committee of five paid $25,000 and received a deed for three acres of land where a depot would be built. W.W. added that “Doubtless without this contribution the road would not have been completed for another year as the company's financial condition at that time was already strained to the utmost.” The final cost amounted to $356,135, including the rail line itself as well as locomotives and other railcars.

    It was not long until Dorsey realized that a larger, competing railroad would be built along the Columbia River, rendering his line “valueless.” He made the decision to sell the entire system to the Oregon Steam Navigation Company on the basis that “he who controls the freight to the approaches to the river owns the river,” W.W. wrote. The deal closed on Feb. 18, 1878, and the acquisition price generated a handsome profit. He used the proceeds to build two more rail lines of 15 miles in length, connecting Walla Walla with Dixie and Tracy, WA, which later were sold to the Northern Pacific Railway Company.

    In tribute, Gov. Miles C. Moore praised Dorsey, saying that "Few men living in pioneer surroundings ever had the opportunity of seeing the happy fruition of their early efforts such as Doctor Baker witnessed, for he beheld the transformation of a crude pioneer section-a wilderness of opportunities-into a thriving center of civilization. His railroad enterprise contributed greatly to the settlement and upbuilding of the Inland Empire. It was his foresight more than any other human agency which made Walla Walla the early commercial metropolis for eastern Washington and for Montana and Idaho as well."

    Dorsey passed away in Walla Walla at the age of 64 on July 5, 1888. Burial was in the city's Mountain View Cemetery. He was the subject of a January 1923 article entitled “The Building of the Walla Walla & Columbia River Railroad” by his son W.W. Baker, appearing in The Washington Historical Quarterly. W.W. later authored a more comprehensive biography, in 1934, Forty Years a Pioneer: Business Life of Dorsey Syng Baker. In 1955, another biography was published entitled Gold, Rawhide and Iron, by granddaughter Helen Baker Reynolds. Dorsey's papers today are housed in the Baker Family Collection in the Penrose Collection of Whitman College in Walla Walla.

    Main Street in Walla Walla, WA, early 1900s 

    Great-grandson Edward Franklin Baker (1851- ? ) was born on May 29, 1851. His wife was Sarah A. Miller (March 26, 1843). Their five children were Edith Frances Baker (born 1876), Alice Maude Baker (1878), Dorsey Franklin Baker (1880), Mary Edna Baker (1882) and Charles Edwin Baker (1884).

    Great-granddaughter Mary Elizabeth Moore (1853- ? ) was born on Feb. 16, 1853. She entered into marriage with Miles Conway Moore ( ? - ? ). They relocated to Walla Walla, WA. A trio of children were Francis Allen Moore (born 1874), Walter Baker Moore (1876) and Robert L. Baker (1879).

    Great-grandson Henry Clay Dorsey Baker (1858- ? ) was born on May 13, 1858.

    Great-grandson William W. Baker (1861- ? ) was born on March 22, 1861.

    Great-granddaughter Ida "Mabel" Baker (1868- ? ) was born on July 25, 1868 in Walla Walla. She wed Louis Francis Anderson ( ? - ? ). She joined the Daughters of the American Revolution, member no. 46519, on the merits of service of her great-great grandfather, Elisa Baker (1724-1797), a member of the convention that framed the terms of the Massachusetts constitution. 

    Great-granddaughter Anna Amelia Baker (1870- ? ) was born on Jan. 19, 1870.

    Great-granddaughter Henrietta Frances Baker (1871-1877) was born in 1871. Sadly, at the age of about six, she passed away circa 1877.

    Great-granddaughter Laura Belle Baker (1872-1877) was born in 1872. Death swept her away at about age five in 1877.

    Great-granddaughter Lillian Haupt Baker (1874-1877) was born in 1874. She surrendered to death at age three in 1877.

    Great-granddaughter Blanche Elizabeth Baker (1877-1878) died at about a year of age in 1878.

    Great-granddaughter Ada Louise Baker (1883- ? ) was born on March 6, 1883.

    Great-granddaughter Rosaline Imogene Baker (1878- ? ) was born on Nov. 26, 1878.

  • Granddaughter Ruth Eliza Baker (-1826-) died in infancy.
  • John Franklin Boyer
    Courtesy R. Hale
    Granddaughter Sarah Elizabeth Baker (1827-1903) was born on Oct. 10, 1827 in Centerville, Macoupin County, IL. In 1853, she was united in matrimony with John Franklin Boyer (1824-1897), a Kentuckian by birth who grew up in Ohio and Indiana. The couple made their dwelling-place in Walla Walla, WA. They produced seven offspring together -- Charles Summerfield Boyer, Franklin Dorsey Boyer, Eugene Howard Boyer, Arthur Albert Boyer, Annie Isabelle Boyer, John Edward Boyer and Sarah "Imogen" Thomson. John left home at the age of 20 and moved to Arkansas, clerking in a general store. Then in 1849, when gold was discovered in California, he joined the gold rush and found a measure of success in mining the precious miner. He used his earnings to set up a merchant business in Sonora, CA. When returning to Arkansas in 1852, he left the business with a partner only to learn later that it was destroyed by fire. elected to stay in Arkansas indefinitely. After his marriage, he joined forces with her brother Dorsey and in 1854 joined him in Walla Walla in a mercantile business, sailing to the West Coast via the Isthmus of Panama. John found his niche when miners would entrust their gold to him when going back to the mines. Said one account, "They would bring large amounts of gold dust to the store in buckskin pouches with the owner's name attached -- either on a card tied to the sack or written on the sack itself. In many instances John Boyer was the only living witness that anything at all had been entrusted to his care. Although this system continued for many years -- with miners sometimes leaving $30 to $40,000 dollars at the store -- there were never any losses, disputes or misunderstandings over these pioneer transactions." In time the two brothers-in-law realized that there were more lucrative businesses than store-keeping. They proceeded to found the first bank in the territory, with John focusing full-time on that work, and Dorsey spending most of his time establishing the Walla Walla and Columbia River Railroads. The "Baker-Boyer Bank" was chartered nationally in 1889 and John named its inaugural president, a post he held for the balance of his life. In the realm of public affairs, he served as treasurer of Walla Walla County for a dozen years and tapped in 1872 to be receiver of the U.S. Land Office. He supported with money and time the missionary work of Rev. Cushing Eells of the Congregational Church in Oregon and Washington and  the founders of Whitman College. For three decades, he was a trustee of the Whitman seminary and college and was its treasurer and just before the end of his life elected president of its board of trustees. He also contributed to the support of St. Paul's School as an Episcopal Church vestryman and warden. Said one history, "He was a lovable and sociable man, always warmhearted and charitable." Sadly, John died in Walla Walla at the age of 72 on Feb. 8, 1897. Sarah lived for another six years and endured heart disease The spectre of death cleaved her away in Walla Walla at the age of 75 on May 20, 1903. An obituary was published in the Tacoma Daily Ledger. Their final resting place is in the city's Mountain View Cemetery.

    Great-grandson Charles Summerfield Boyer (1854- ? ) was born on June 1, 1854. He wed Elizabeth Berry ( ? - ? ). They made a home in Spokane, WA and were the parents of Isabelle Boyer (born 1881), Marguerite Boyer (1882) and Charles S. Boyer (1884).

    Great-grandson Franklin Dorsey Boyer (1856-1915  was born on Aug. 20, 1856 or 1858. He died in Canada at the age of 57, in the Yukon Census Division, on Nov. 7, 1915. His remains sleep in Canadian soil in Dawson, Yukon Province.

    Great-grandson Eugene Howard Boyer (1859- ? ) was born on Feb. 6, 1859.

    Great-grandson Arthur Albert Boyer (1861- ? ) was born on April 21, 1861.

    Great-granddaughter Annie Isabelle Boyer (1863- ? ) was born on New Year's Eve 1863.

    Great-grandson John Edward Boyer (1866-1961) was born on Dec. 29, 1866. He wed Louise Hutsinpiller (1877-1958). Their two known sons were Fremont Ford Boyer and John F. Boyer. John devoted his career to the practice of law. Louise surrendered to the spirit of death in 1958. Death swept him away at the age of 94 on May 30, 1961. Burial was in Walla Walla's Mountain View Cemetery. Inscribed on their grave marker is the scripture from 1 John 2:17: "The world passeth away, but he that doeth the will of God abideth forever."

    Great-granddaughter Sarah "Imogen" Boyer (1869-1957) was born on March 28, 1869. She was an alumna of St. Paul's School for Girls, and then served as its principal for six years, from 1897 to 1903. At one time it was located at Third and Poplar, and then closed for a decade. Said an obituary, "it was during her principalship that the school's present site was acquired." In 1907, when she was about 38 years of age, she entered into marriage with Dr. Robert Lyle Thomson (1855-1937), a Kentucky native. He was a gradaute of the Kentucky School of Medicine in Louisville and then taught anatomy at his alma mater. Later he was a specialist in New York's Manhattan Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital. Said the Spokane Spokesman-Review, "He belonged to the generation of young men who heeded Horace Greeley's advice, 'Go wet young man,' and after equipping himself as an eye, ear, nose and throat specialist traveled to Spokane to begin his practice. That was in 1890, as Spokane was rebuilding itself after the fire, and the doctor practiced here until 1914, when his health failed and he was obliged to retire." The pair dwelled in Seattle in 1905 and later in Spokane, dividing their time between there and California. Said the Spokesman-Review, "Dr. Thomson built up one of the largest practices in the state and was consulted by people from throughout the Inland Empire. In appearance, a Lincolnesque sort of man with a twinkle in his eye and a sympathetic manner, he typified the old family physician in the interest he took in patients. People took their troubles to him as well as their physical afflictions. His charities were many, it was said, in helping afflicted. He was a lover of music and sponsored many of Spokane's musical efforts. A member of the Presbyterian church, he was a devout man and talked much of his faith. Whenever asked to analyze his success, he would always state that his faith was the dominant power in his life."  Sadly, while on a visit to Imogen's nephew Robert Boyer in Almota, WA on Dec. 11, 1936, Robert was stricken and died at the age of 80. His obituary was published in Northwest Medicine and reprinted in the Spokane Spokesman-Review. A eulogy was delivered in February 1937 by Rev. Dr. Paul Calhoun in the First Presbyterian Church of Spokane. At his death, she relocated to Seattle and stayed for good. She died in Seattle on Dec. 3, 1957. Interment was in Mountain View Cemetery in Walla Walla.

KIlian's grave, 1838, in English
Courtesy Tom Myers
~ Son Killian Junghen/Youngken ~

Son Killian Junghen (1780-1838) was born on Jan. 13, 1780, in Springfield Township, Bucks County, the only son of his father's second marriage.

He was eight years of age when his father died. He then became the legal ward of his half-brother-in-law, Henry Haupt.

Killian learned the occupations of farming and milling. At some point he adopted the spelling of "Youngken" as is shown on his grave marker.

In 1804, at the age of 23 or 24, he wed Catherine Fackenthall (June 18, 1779-1859), daughter of Michael and Christena (Derr) Fackenthall. 

They bore these known children together -- John Fackenthal Youngken (in 1805 in Herkimer County, NY), Mary Youngkin, Joseph Youngkin, Samuel F. Youngken, Eliza Summers and Christena Youngkin.

At the age of 58 years and 19 days, Killian died on Feb. 1, 1838 in Tinicum Township, Bucks County. Interment was in the Lower Tinicum church cemetery, also known as the "Fox Grave Yard," in Bucks County. A one-sentence obituary was published in the Bucks County Intelligencer.

His last will and testament is still on file in Bucks County, no. 7266. The stone marking his grave still stands, is legible and written in English, showing how quickly the family was adapting to the American customs and language from a German way typically resistant to change.

Killian's obit, Bucks County Intelligencer, 1838 
Catherine lived for another 21 years as a widow. When the federal census enumeration was made in 1850, Catherine lived in Tinicum Township, at the age of 70, employing 19-year-old Hannah Bigly as a live-in domestic.

She died in March 1859.

When in 1905 her late father was profiled in the book A Genealogical and Personal History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, Vol. III, authored by William W.H. Davis, her name and key dates and married name were included.

Decades later, Catherine's grand-nephew Dr. B.F. Fackenthal, age 88, who was actively preserving old Pennsylvania German records and letters, contributed content published in the Aug. 10, 1939 edition of the Younkin Family News Bulletin. He helped the publisher track down Killian's descendants in California, among them a granddaughter, Kate Y. Willis. Dr. Fackenthal at the time had "just recently built a library (costing many thousands of dollars for Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pa.," reported the YFNB.

Christ Lutheran and Reformed Church, Lower Tinicum 

Son John Fackenthall Junghen/Youngkin (1805-1870) was born on Aug. 1, 1805 in Herkimer County, NY. He migrated to 1829 and settled in the village of Friendsville, Wabash County. The town is said to be named for the many settlers to put down roots there from Friendsville, Susquehanna County, PA. Said the 1976 book History of Wabash County, "the original proprietors [of the town] were William R. Wilkinson, John F. Youngken and Cyrus Danforth in 1854. Robert Parkinson sold the first goods from the Wood and Parkinson store from a room of the John Youngken house in 1835." He first tied the marital knot with Harriet Danforth (Dec. 19, 1801-1858), daughter of Cyrus and Mary (Clarke) Danforth. The wedding was held in Mount Carmel, Wabash County. Their three known children were John Cyrus Killian Youngkin, Samuel Thomas Youngkin and Mary Catharine Youngkin. Their primary income was derived by farming, as shown in the 1850 federal census enumeration, a year when Harriet's parents lived next door. In addition, in 1844, representing Wabash County, he served in the Illinois House of Representatives. He also was clerk of the semi-annual Sabbath Convention for South Eastern Illinois circa 1854. In 1856, he was an active committeeman on the Anti-Nebraska Kansas Meeting of the People. This group was formed in opposition to the Kansas–Nebraska Act of 1854 and in an effort to repeal the Missouri Compromise forbidding slavery in U.S. territories north of a certain line. The farm he owned as of 1858, when he owed unpaid real estate taxes, was part of the west half of northwest Section 24, Range 72, in Town 1 North, Range 13 West. Sadly, Harriet passed away at the age of 56 on Aug. 31, 1858. John remained a widower for 21 months. On May 23, 1860, he married a second time to Eliza Boileau (1814- ? ), daughter of Daniel Boileau of Tinicum, Bucks County. The nuptials may have been held in Reigelsville, Bucks County, by the hand of Rev. S.M. Andrews. The second union endured for a decade until cleaved apart by death. In June 1866, living in Friendsville, IL, John received a bequest of $354.53 from the estate of his late aunt Anna Maria Fackenthall. He signed a document releasing Michael Fackenthall as estate administrator, with the language published many years later in a 1938 edition of the Younkin Family News Bulletin. Sadly, John died on May 27, 1870. Many years after John's death, Rev. S.C. Baldridge gave a sermon, published in 1896 in the Mt. Carmel Republican, which listed  his name among the "unusual number of Christian men of talents and influence who have honored this village. To the thoughtful mind it must seem strange that a place so remote, so unimportant as this should have been blessed with the moral and influence of such men..." The widowed Eliza moved to New Jersey, where she spent her final years. Death enveloped her in Frenchtown, NJ at the age of 85 on Sept. 2, 1899. Her funeral rites were conducted by a former pastor, Rev. William H. Filson, of Easton, PA and her nephew Rev. Horace D. Sassaman of Parsippany, NJ.  News of her demise was printed in the Mount Carmel (IL) Register, saying she was "for many years a resident of Friendsville, and, for a brief period, of this city... The deceased had many friends among our older people. She was gentle and amiable, a high type of the gentlewoman of days gone by." An obituary in The Presbyterian edition of September 1899 said she "was blessed with a pious ancestry, and early consecrated her life to the Saviour, whom she served with rare devotion all the days of her life. Being the daughter of a ruling elder, and wife of a ruling elder, in the Presbyterian Church, she was conversant and greatly interested in the extension of Christ's Kingdom upon earth."  

  • History of Wayne County, Illinois
    Courtesy Google Books
    Grandson John Cyrus Killian "J.C.K." Youngkin/Youngken (1839-1917) was born in 1839 in Friendsville, Wabash County, IN. In young manhood me graduated from Hanover College. John wed with Julia B. ( ? - ? ). They became the parents of Harry Herman Youngken, Anna Kate Willis, Benjamin Noble Youngken, Charles "Thomas" Youngken and Cyrus "Donald" Youngken. John joined the Union Army during the Civil War and was placed into the 115th Illinois Infantry, Company C. He is believed to have been commissioned a first lieutenant. After the war's end, he returned home and was tapped to be principal of the Friendsville Academy, with Miss Finley as his assistant. In 1866, the seminary building was erected, where the school held classes. He continued until 1870 when he was named principal of the Mount Carmel (IL) Schools, replaced in Friendsville by Rev. Dr. William Henry Smith. In 1883, after a move, he was described by the Mount Carmel (IL) Register as " a prosperous business man of Fairfield." As compensation for his wartime service, John was awarded a military pension in July 1890 at a time when they were residing in Illinois. [Invalid App. #811.077 - Cert. #654.696]. A profile in the 1884 book History of Wayne County, Illinois, produced by Globe Publishing Company, Chicago: 

    ...He represented his district in the State Legislature and there characterized himself by introducing into that body a bill to restrict the liquor traffic. He was an earnest temperance worker, a zealous member of the Presbyterian Church, and the impress of his molding hand in the community in which he lived so long will never cease to be felt... He is an Elder in the Presbyterian Church, of which his entire family are members.

    As of 1896, the Yungkens' home was in Ventura, CA, where he was employed by the Ventura Lumber Company. He was named in the Feb. 6, 1896 edition of the Mount Carmel Register article about former Wabash citizens who had gone elsewhere to "grow up with the country" and now "wish they were home again." He said that he knew of no other Wabash Countians in Southern California "except of my own family from the Wabash." He also became a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, a veteran's organization, and belonged to its Cushing Post in Ventura. Their final address together was at 5516 Echo Street, Los Angeles, where they had lived for a dozen years. At the age of 78, John died at home on Nov. 30, 1917. An obituary appeared in the Los Angeles Evening Express and the Mount Carmel Daily Republican, the latter of which opined that he "was a man of high character and a true Christian gentleman. He became a member of the Presbyterian church at Friendsville as a young man and continued in that faith until his death." Burial was in Forest Lawn Cemetery. The widowed Julia successfully petitioned to receive her late spouse's pension [Widow App. #1.114.298 - Cert. #860.626].  Julia remained in Los Angeles to the end of her life. She passed away at home at the age of 82 in mid-October 1930. Her son Harry traveled from Santa Paula to attend the funeral services. An obituary in the Ventura Morning Free Press said she had "lived in Ventura county for many years and was well known among the old time residents here."

    Younkin Family News Bulletin, 1939 
    Great-grandson Harry Herman "H.H." Youngken (1868-1942) was born in 1868. He served as postmaster of Santa Paula, CA in 1905 and lived in the community for 54 years. In time he became employed as secretary of the Santa Paula Building and Loan Association, later becoming president. He had owned a ranch near Fillmore, CA. He wed Loula "Maud" and was the father of Ada Robinson, Gertrude Christensen, Irene Self and Ralph Youngken. The Selfs resided on the Youngken ranch at Fillmore in 1938. Circa 1938, they relocated to the Sespe District, and then in 1941 to Bakersfield. Sadly, Henry died in Bakersfield on Dec. 2, 1942. An obituary in the Santa Barbara News-Press said his passing "was a shock to his many friends... He was a musician, playing the cornet in many local musical organizations. After his retirement he devoted much time to his hobby, flowers, and many beautiful specimens were developed under his care."

    Great-granddaughter Anna Kate Youngken (1871-1953) was born in 1871. Single in 1930, she dwelled in Los Angeles. She married (?) Willis ( ? - ? ). Circa 1938, when her writings were published in the Younkin Family News Bulletin, her address was 601 Washington Street, Alhambra, CA..

    Great-grandson Benjamin Noble Youngken (1872-1951) was born on Oct. 1, 1872 in Fairfield, IL. He moved to Orcutt, Santa Barbara County, CA  where he had charge of the machine shops of Union Oil Company and the Union Tool Company, circa 1912. The business later became the National Supply Company. Benjamin held memberships in the Al Malaikah Shrine Temple and Petroleum Pioneers. In 1892, he tied the knot with Caroline Baker ( ? -1938). Four offspring among their brood were Helen Frances Webb, Alice Ann Bennison, Phyllis Porter and Clarence Eldon Youngken. Sadly, Caroline died suddenly on Feb. 4, 1938. Benjamin outlived his spouse by a baker's dozen years and appears to have wed a second time to Ruby Rae Conlisk (1888-1985). He passed away at the age of 79, in Los Angeles, on Oct. 1, 1951. An obituary was published in the Los Angeles Times. Their remains sleep in eternal repose in Inglewood Park Cemeterey.

    Great-grandson Charles "Thomas" Youngken (1882-1938) was born in 1882. He lived with his parents in Ventura in 1905 and later in Africa, where his daughter was born. He was the father of Helen Edith Youngkin, who married T.W. Poole in Schenectady, NY circa 1937. The Pooles sailed to the Philippines in 1938, where he was employed by General Electric Company.

    Great-grandson Cyrus "Donald" "C.D." Youngken (1889- ? ) was born in 1889 in Fairfield, IL. He relocated to California with his parents at the age of three, and dwelled with them in 1905 in Ventura, CA. 

  • Grandson Samuel Thomas Youngkin ( ? - ? ) was born in Friendsville, Wabash County, IN. He died at the age of 10. Nothing more is known.
 
Charles' entry in the History of White County, Illinois. Courtesy Google Books
  • The McDowells' grave, Carmi, IL
    Courtesy "Carmian"
    Granddaughter Mary Catharine Youngkin (1844-1883) was born on Jan. 27, 1844 in Wabash County. On Oct. 25, 1864, she wed lawyer Charles E. McDowell (July 22, 1838- ? ), son of James and Elizabeth P. (Watson) McDowell of Mt. Carmel, Wabash County, IL. They established a home in Illinois and were the parents of Hattie McDowell. Charles had moved to White County in December 1859 and "read law" with Col. John E. Whiting, and in late 1861 was admitted to practice in Illinois. He was appointed White County Superintendent of Schools in 1862 and later re-elected, serving for seven years until 1869. Charles in 1869 was elected to the Illinois State Constitutional Convention and then in 1876 to the Illinois State Senate, representing the counties of Hamilton, Jefferson and White of the 46th District. In this role, along with James M. Sharp of Wabash County and William G. Bowman of Gallatin County, he signed a report circa 1870 proposing to restrict the right to vote to white males, although willing to let the state's voters decide whether "Negroes" should be allowed to vote. He maintained his law practice, in partnership with J.I. McClintock, focusing on real estate. Charles was profiled in the 1883 book History of White County. Their teenage daughter became seriously ill with rheumatism in September 1882, with her condition feared as hopeless. Her mother literally worried herself to death, dying on March 21, 1883. An obituary appeared in the Mount Carmel Register, saying "The terrible strain upon her mind and nervous system brought on general prostration of both brain and body, and a  few days  ago she was stricken down, soon lost consciousness and gradually sank until death came to her relief. Mrs. McDowell was a lady univerally beloved by all who knew her. Kind, cheerful and charitable, she made friends wherever she went, and to-day is mourned by the entire society of which she was one of the brightest ornaments." Daughter Hattie rallied a bit in early March, but then descended into her own demise, succumbing to the spectre of death on June 16, 1883, after 10 months of suffering. Their remains were interred next to each other in the "Old Graveyard" in Carmi.

Daughter Mary Youngkin ( ? - ? ). She passed away unmarried at the age of 20 or 22 in Tinicum. Burial was in Lower Tinicum Union Cemetery.

Son Joseph Youngkin (1808- ? ) was born on Dec. 2, 1808 in Tinicum, Bucks County. He did not survive childhood. Death cleaved him away at the age of six to eight years in Tinicum. His remains were laid to rest in Lower Tinicum Union Cemetery.

Daughter Eliza Younken (1813-1873) was born on Oct. 24, 1813 in Tinicum. On Jan. 8, 1835, at the age of 21, she married Isaac Summers (April 9, 1807-1874). Three known daughters were Catharine Harriet Heany/Keeny, Catharine Ulmer and Mary Christina Summers. Grief swept over the family when Mary Christina died as she neared her 18th birthday in 1869. Eliza died in the Tinicum community of her birth at the age of 59 on April 13, 1873. Interment of the remains was in the new cemetery of the Lower Tinicum Church. Isaac outlived her by five years. The angel of death cleaved him away at the age of 67 on Sept. 23, 1874. Their grave markers are standing and legible today.

  • Granddaughter Catherine Harriet Summers (1836- ? ) was born in April 1836. She reputedly married (?) Heany/Keeny ( ? - ? ). She died young. The body was interred in Lower Tinicum Church Cemetery. 
  • Granddaughter Catharine Summers (1844-1864) was born on May 24, 1844 in Tinicum, Bucks County. She wed Israel Ulmer ( ? - ? ). Their only daughter, Katy Ulmer, died at birth in 1864. Catharine passed away at the age of 20 years, two months and 12 days on Aug. 6, 1864. Her remains lie in eternal repose in Lower Tinicum Church Cemetery. Her stone remains upright and legible.
  • Granddaughter Mary Christina Summers (1851-1869) was born on May 5, 1851. She surrendered to the angel of death at the age of 17 years, 11 months and 12 days on March 30, 1869. Interment was in Lower Tinicum Church Cemetery.
   
Graves of siblings Samuel (1831) and Christena (1836). Courtesy Tom Myers

Son Samuel F. Youngken (1811-1831) was born on April 15, 1811. At his Christian baptism in infancy, Johannas Fackenthal and Elisabeth were his sponsors, He only lived for 20 years of life. Death swept him away in Tinicum on Aug. 31, 1831. Interment was in Lower Tinicum Union Cemetery in Tinicum. News of his death was published in the Bucks County Intelligencer.

Daughter Christena Youngken (1815-1836) was born on Oct. 11, 1815. She never married. Sadly, at the age of 20, Christena died on Sept. 25, 1836. Burial was in Lower Tinicum Union Cemetery in Tinicum.

 

Copyright © 2023 Mark A. Miner

Research for this page conducted by Della Shafer and the late Donna (Younkin) Logan