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Rachel (Sturtz) Emerick
(1805-1885)

 

Rachel and Jonathan Emerick. Courtesy Courtney Moen

Rachel (Sturtz) Emerick was born on Dec. 4 or 14, 1805 in Gladdens, Southampton Township, Somerset County, PA, the daughter of John "Adam" and Maria "Catherine" (Gaumer) Sturtz Sr. She grew up on the family farm with her eight brothers and sisters.

Rachel married Jonathan Emerick Sr. (1799-1887), the son of Andrew and Christena (Heller) Emrich. Jonathan had been born on the home farm on Nov. 15, 1799.

Jonathan's father Andrew Emerick, a.k.a. Andreas Emmerich (1754-1838) was a German immigrant from Langendiebach in the state of Hesse Cassel. While a young man in Germany, he was a member of the Evangelische Kirchengemeinde of Langendiebach, known in English as the Evangelical Church parish of Langendiebach. Andrew sailed to America on the ship Charming Molly, arriving at the port of Philadelphia with his cousin Casimir May and friend Caspar Adam. Having taken an oath of allegiance to King George III on Oct. 22, 1773, he would have been considered a Tory during the American Revolution. Records suggest that he served as a soldier during the American Revolution, perhaps on the side of the British. Jonathan's mother, Christena (1765-1835?), was a native of Reading, Berks County, PA.

The bride was 15 years younger than the groom, and it's possible he had been married previously. Their baker's dozen known children were Nathan Emerick, Jacob Emerick, Catherine Troutman, Lydia Beal, Emanuel Emerick, Rachel Korns, Christina Burkett, Josiah Emerick, Jonathan Emerick Jr., Solomon Emerick, Rebecca Knieriem, Lafayette Emerick and John Emerick. 

In May 1847, Jonathan was named as a grand juror in Somerset County Court, and was listed in the Somerset Herald and Farmers' and Mechanics' Register newspaper. The family made its home in Southampton Township in 1850 when the census was taken, living in close proximity to a host of related families -- Andrew and Rebecca Emerick, Rebecca and Israel Emerick, John and Louisa (Emerick) Korns, Joseph and Barbara Emerick and Jacob and Lena Emerick.

The Emericks were members of Gladden's Run Reformed and Lutheran Church, founded in 1846. The Waterman Watkins & Co. book of 1884, History of Bedford, Somerset, and Fulton Counties, Pennsylvania, states that in November 1872:

...the congregation was regularly organized by Rev. [Benjamin] Knepper, the pastor, who is still in charge. The first church officers were Israel Emrich and Andrew Everlain, elders; Bailey Shumaker and Samuel Shumaker, deacons. The oldest members were Jonathan Emrich, Benjamin Baker, A. Getz, Frederick Hasselroth, Solomon Shumaker, Nathan Emrich and D. Liebau. The church edifice, erected at a cost of about two thousand dollars, was dedicated November 24, 1872. Present membership of the church, eighty-four; sabbath school, forty-five. The preaching is alternately in English and German. It was formerly wholly in German.

 

Farms of "J. Emerick" and "A. Emerick" in the Comp District of Southampton Township, just west of the Allegheny Mountain top in Somerset County, 1876\

 

When the federal census enumeration again was made in 1870, the family dwelled on a farm in Southampton Township, with the census-taker spelling the name "Emrick." Also in the household were 46-year-old Nathan Emrick, 23-year-old Lafayette Emrick as well as Martha E. Emrick (age 2) and Sarah Emrick (one month old). Emma Burket lived under their roof as a domestic servant. Residing nearby were the families of John and Elizabeth Emrick, Solomon and Ellen (Albright) Emrick, and Alexander and Elizabeth Emrick.

 

The census of 1880 shows the aged couple living with their married son Lafayette and his wife Mary in Southampton Township.

Rachel passed into eternity in Somerset County at the age of 79 years, 10 months and 27 days on Oct. 5, 1885. Her remains were placed into repose in the Emerick burying ground. The cemetery is located at what today is known as the "Jack Lantz farm," 590 Ridge Road in Hyndman.

Jonathan lived for just two years as a widower. He succumbed on Sept. 26, 1887 at the age of 87 years, 10 months and 11 days. Interment was in the private Emerick Cemetery on the home farm in Southampton Township. In September 1889, the Somerset Herald published a notice stating that his sons Nathan and Solomon were serving as administrators of the estate and were expected to file a first and final account. 

He is named in a short reference in the 1912 book by John W. Jordan and James Hadden, entitled Genealogical and Personal History of Fayette County, Pennsylvania, Vol. III. In 1993-1994, this family was chronicled in the Emerick Family Newsletter, author unknown.

 

~ Son Nathan Emerick ~

Son Nathan Emerick (1824-1913) was born on Feb. 15, 1824 and grew up on a farm in Gladdens, Somerset County.

He never married and spent his life in Southampton Township as a farmer.

In 1870, he resided with his parents, and in 1880 lived with them under the roof of his married younger brother Lafayette.

 

Comp's Church, erected in 1879 with help from Nathan Emerick and his brothers and Gaumer cousins

Reported the Meyersdale Republican, Nathan "was of amiable disposition and loved and was esteemed by all for his noble qualities of mind and heart."

Circa 1879, Nathan and his brothers, Gaumer cousins and others helped erect a new house of worship for the community, known as Comp's Lutheran and Reformed Church.

Then in March 1894, as reported by the Somerset Herald, he initiated a legal complaint against John Emerick (his brother?) and won damages of $96.33.

The actual farm where Nathan dwelled comprised 90-plus acres in Southampton. His neighbors included his brother John, the Buffalo Company, and Charles and Lidy Boyer.

Nathan's post office in 1913 was just across the state line in Ellerslie, Allegany County, MD. As he was dying, he chose to stay at the old homestead in Gladdens.

Nathan died at the age of 88 years, 10 months and 21 days on Feb. 5, 1913. An obituary in the Republican said he was survived by five brothers and two sisters. "He was the oldest of the Emerick family of eight brothers and five sisters. His father was in his 89th year when he died and his grandfather was in his 93rd year."

Rev. J.C. Knable, of the Wellersburg Reformed Church, "preached an appropriate sermon," said the Republican. Burial was in Comp's Cemetery in Southampton Township. The inscription from his grave marker was recorded by Works Progress Administration laborers in the 1930s. No record of his passing has been found in Pennsylvania death records. In his last will and testament, he bequeathed his "entire estate among his brothers and sisters and 50 nephews." He willed his farm to his nephew George H. Emerick, and left $25 each to his surviving sublings and $10 each to his nephews and nieces whose parents were no longer living.

 

~ Daughter Catherine (Emerick) Troutman ~

Daughter Catherine Emerick (1825-1912) was born on Aug. 25, 1825 in Southampton Township.

At the age of 20, on Christmas Day 1845, she married 24-year-old Daniel Benjamin Troutman (1821-1891).

They produced seven children -- Sylvester "Sylvatus" Troutman, Noah "Henry" Troutman, Mary E. Troutman, Harriet L. Power, Lucy Troutman, Emma Troutman and Perry D. Troutman.

When the federal census was taken in 1850, the Troutmans made their residence in Londonderry Township, Bedford County, where Daniel served as justice of the peace. By 1860, still living in Londonderry, Daniel's primary source of income was as a gunsmith.

At the end of the Civil War, and after two decades of married life, the Troutmans pulled up their stakes in Pennsylvania in 1865 and migrated to Kansas, where they settled in Ottawa, Franklin County. There, Daniel continued his occupational specialty as a gunsmith, and their daughter Reny was born in 1870.

In the spring of 1881, Daniel served as an election polling clerk in Franklin County and received $2.00 in compensation, and he remained active as a judge of elections in the county for many years. He also maintained a weapons store in Ottawa, and in mid-February 1887, burglars made off with a number of ammunition rounds and revolvers.

Daniel passed away during Christmas week in 1891, at the age of 69 years, one month and 27 days. His death terminated a marriage of almost 46 years. Rev. Scherer of St. Paul's Lutheran Church officiated at the funeral service, with burial in the Highland Cemetery. In an obituary, the Daily Republic said that Daniel "was well known to all the old citizens, who held him in high esteem for his many noble and kindly qualities."

Catherine lived for another two-plus decades as a widow and maintained her home at 126 South Oak Street in Ottawa. In October 1904 she traveled to Kansas City to visit relatives. Catherine died at the home of their married daughter Ella Tuly two miles west of Princeton, Franklin County on April 4, 1912. Burial was beside her husband. [Find-a-Grave]

Their great-grandson, George Christian Schempp, wrote extensively about the family in his 1989 book, The Schempp Family History (Gateway Press, 448 pages). There is no known connection between our Troutmans and Kansas Governor James A. Troutman (1853-1926), son of pioneer settlers William H. and Nancy (Smith) Troutman.

Son Sylvester Troutman (1849-1895), sometimes known as "Sylvatus," was born in about 1849 in Londonderry Township, Bedford County. As a teenager, he migrated to Kansas with his parents and younger siblings. He married Helen (1856- ? ), a Virginia native who was seven years younger than he. Their children were Pearl Troutman and May Troutman. Early in their marriage, the Troutmans moved to Arkansas, where their eldest child was born. But by December 1879, they were back in Franklin, Ottawa County for the birth of their next child, and where they remained as shown in the 1880 federal census. By 1895, the family migrated again, this time to Oklahoma. Sylvester made news in February 1895 when he returned to Ottawa for a visit and became ill with influenza, known as "la grippe." Reported the Ottawa Daily Republic, he "has manifested insanity of an extremely violent character. The tendency of his ailment was noticable in a pronounced degree Friday night last, since which time the unfortunate man has been constantly under restraint. He became so violent that on Saturday it was deemed advisable to secure admission for him to one of the hospitals for the insane. Information was lodged with the Judge of Probate, and an examination was had Saturday. He was found to be insane, and committed for the hospital. He was being as tenderly cared for and guarded, as possible, but was so wild that it was found imperative to take him to the sick ward of the jail, where in addition to handcuffs and ankle-fetters, it was found necessary to strap him to the bed. Even then the services of two attendants were constantly required. The unfortunate man is less violent today, and has occasional rational moments. He has a wife and large family of children." Within a week or so, he was transferred to an asylum at Osawatomie, Miami County, KS. Sadly, he died in the Osawatomie asylum on March 6, 1895, just a few weeks after the onset of his final illness. His remains were transported back to Ottawa for funeral services held at the English Lutheran Church at the corner of Sixth and Maple Streets. After his death, J.A. Elwell requested reimbursement in the amount of $24 from the county for providing guards for Sylvatus' confinement. Federal census records for 1900 show Helen living alone on a farm she owned in Saline, Woods County, OK and working as a farmer.

  • Grandson Pearl Troutman (1878- ? ) was born in 1878. On March 16, 1899, at the age of 21, he was joined in wedlock with 19-year-old Alice Johnson ( ? - ? ). Rev. W.L. Morris led the wedding service in Osage City, KS. They made their home in 1905 in Mena, AR. Evidence suggests that by 1910, the family returned to Kansas and dwelled in Kansas City, Wyandotte County, and that the two children in the family were Sylvester Troutman and Beulah Troutman.
  • Granddaughter May Troutman (1879- ? ) was born in Dec. 1880 in Ottawa, Franklin County, KS.

Son Noah "Henry" Troutman (1851- ? ) was born in about 1851 in Londonderry Township. After coming to Kansas, he learned his father's trade in gunsmithing and, after his father's death in 1891, took over the gun shop in Ottawa, located at 111 First Street. In April 1909, he relocated the business to 117 North Main Street. His name constantly was printed in the Ottawa Daily Republic for his business and civic activities. At Christmas 1893, he exhibited a small, hand-made iron screw said to have been taken from the desk of George Washington, and which had been exhibited at the World's Fair,. In May 1894, he offered the prize of a bicycle lamp for the third-place finisher in an Ottawa Cycling Club race. Circa June 1895, he owned a half-interest in a self-cleaning fishing boat with Charley Nolan. Said the Daily Republic, "It is doubtful if any living man has that much confidence in it." In addition to weaponry, he fixed bicycles and sold such hardware as thermometers and once introduced a scissors sharpener that had been invented by Thomas Edison. Henry also enjoyed fishing, and made it a practice to cast his lines from a local dam following floods, typically an opportune time to snag a croppie. Reported the Daily Republic, "Henry Troutman will be among the first to flit like a fat ghost around a corner of the abutment, accompanied by that dog of his whose tail is everlastingly getting tangled with somebody's line. But whether Henry comes early or late, he is pretty certain to electrify the crowd by yanking out the biggest beauty of the day." In October 1909, when his mother made an extended visit of several months in Washington, IA, Henry traveled there to bring her home. While riding a bicycle in November 1917, he collided with a passing horse and buggy, breaking one of the buggy wheels and bruising him badly. Henry suffered a stroke of paralysis in the fall of 1919. More about this colorful character will be added here when learned.

Daughter Mary Ellen "Ella" Troutman (1853- ? ) was born in about 1853 in Londonderry Township. After migrating to Kansas as a girl, she grew up in Franklin County and married (?) Tuly. They made their home in Princeton, Franklin County. Sadly, Emma's mother passed away in their residence in April 1912.

Daughter Harriet L. Troutman (1856- ? ) was born in about 1856 in Londonderry Township. She made the migration to Kansas when a girl. At the age of 23, at Christmas 1879, she traveled to Colorado Springs, CO, reported in the gossip columns of the Ottawa Daily Republic, which added that she "has many friends in Ottawa and Harrison who highly esteem her, and sincerely regret her departure." Harriet at age 29 or 30 was united in holy matrimony on July 27, 1886 with H.C. Power ( ? - ? ) of Harper, KS, with Rev. J.A. Lucas officiating at the Methodist Episcopal parsonage. The Harper (KS) Graphic reported that "The contradicting parties will make Harper their future home," a gossip item reprinted in the Daily Republic.

Daughter Lucy Troutman (1860- ? ) was born in July 1860 or 1862 in Londonderry Township, Bedford County. She wed George C. Schempp (1863- ? ), a native of either Ohio or Canada whose parents were German immigrants. By 1889, the Schempps had relocated to the Pacific Northwest to the city of Tacoma, Pierce County, WA, where George operated a steam laundry. Their children were George Schempp and Aldeth Schempp, both born in Washington, plus two others who died young prior to 1900. The Schempps occasionally returned to Ottawa to spend several months visiting with Emma's brother Henry and other relatives. In 1902, Lucy and her aged mother made a trip to Ohio and Pennsylvania. Lucy apparently died during the decade between 1900 and 1910. The federal census for 1910 shows George and the children living on Pacific Avenue in Tacoma, where he continued to manage the laundry, and providing a home for George's brother and sister in law, Jacob and Aldisa Schemp.

Daughter Emma Troutman (1864- ? ) was born in about 1864 in Londonderry Township.  She was wedded to (?) Powers. In 1912, when Emma was named in her mother's newspaper obituary in Kansas, she lived in Washington State.

Son Perry D. Troutman (1870-1954) was born in about February 1870 in Ottawa, Franklin County, KS. His first wife was Amelia Sehnert ( ? - ? ), daughter of Mary M. Sehnert. The couple had two known children -- Harry Ernest Troutman and Katy Blackburn. Heartache blanketed the family on May 3, 1896, when their three-year-old child died of"sparms," as reported by the Ottawa Daily Republic. In February 1897, he was in Kansas City working at the Armour meat packing house, and returned home for a visit. The local gossip columns said that "his hands have become effected, by the handling of the meats in such a manner that the nails on all the fingers are dropping off." By August 1897, they were in Ottawa at the address of East Second Street. Amelia made news in the summer of 1897 when she was arrested following a fight with Mrs. Frank Wilson, a woman of color, in which abusive language allegedly was used. A local judge heard the case and decided that no wrong had been done. Later that year, Amelia sued Perry for divorce in Franklin County and asked for custody of the children. The request was granted, and when he had returned to Kansas City by 1900, Perry told others he was "widowed." In 1900, census records show him employed as a janitor in kansas City and renting his dwelling on Main Street. In 1912, when named in the Ottawa Daily Republic newspaper obituary of his mother, he was back in Ottawa. Perry returned to Kansas City and was there in the fall of 1918. During World War I, their 28-year-old married son Harry, who was farming in Oklahoma, was drafted into the American Expeditionary Force and underwent training at Camp Logan in Texas. Tragically, the young soldier contracted pneumonia and died in camp in early October 1918. News of his death was telegraphed to his aunt Mrs. C.F. Dale of North Cedar Street in Ottawa. His remains were brought back to Ottawa for interment in Highland Cemetery, accompanied by his married sister and brother in law. Today his name adorns a World War I memorial in the cemetery with names of all local soldiers who served from Ottawa. Perry returned to Ottawa for the funeral and shortly thereafter obtained a marriage license to wed Louise M. Mudd ( ? - ? ) of Kansas City. Perry passed into eternity in 1954 at age 84. Interment was in Ottawa's Highland Cemetery. [Find-a-Grave]

 

~ Daughter Lydia (Emerick) Beal ~

Daughter Lydia Emerick (1826- ? ) was born in about 1828, presumably in or near Wellersburg, Southampton Township, Somerset County.

She entered into the bonds of marriage with John Beal (1826- ? ), a native of Maryland.

Eleven known children were born to this union -- Jonas "John" Beal, Jackson Beal, Mary Beal, Emmanuel Beal, Emily Beal, Margaret C. "Maggie" Porter, Frank Beal, Anna Evelyn Bruce, Rachel Beal, Tina Beal and Ellen Beal.

When the federal census enumeration was made in 1850, the Beals dwelled near Lydia's uncle John Adam Sturtz Jr. and aged grandparents in Southampton Township.

Then during the decade of the 1850s, the family migrated across the county line into Londonerry, Bedford County, PA.

On the move again during the 1860s, the Beals relocated into Maryland and in 1870 made a home in Allegany County, MD. The 1880 census shows them in the community of Mt. Savage, Allegany County, a short distance south of Wellersburg.

The final fates of the couple are not yet known.

 

Aerial view of Cumberland, MD, including the zigzag National Highway bypass over the railroad tracks

 

Son Jonas Beal (1848-1912) -- pronounced "John-uss" -- was born in Feb. 1848 in Southampton Township, Somerset County. He never learned to read or write. At the age of 21, he resided on the home farm near Cumberland, Allegany County, MD. All evidence suggests that in about 1874, he married Mary Isabelle Newman (Nov. 1855-1936), also a Pennsylvania native whose parents were Irish immigrants. The eight children born to this couple included John Thomas Beal, Anna J. Beal, Joseph E. Beal, Michael J. Beal, Patrick Beal, William Beal and Charles Beal, plus one who was deceased young, prior to 1900. The family dwelled in 1880-1900 in Mt. Savage, Allegany County, MD. He was employed for years as a laborer with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and in 1900 all of their teenage sons worked as laborers to generate income. Later, they moved into the city of Cumberland, and their address in 1912 was Lexington Street. On the fateful day of Dec. 27, 1912, while at work in the B&O yards near Oldtown Road, the 63-year-old Jonas was struck by a moving engine which was in the process of shifting tracks. "His head was crushed and legs broken," reported the Cumberland Evening Times. He was rushed to Allegany Hospital where he died within the hour. Funeral services were held in the home of his daughter Mrs. H. Crosby at 325 Maryland Avenue. Burial followed in St. Patrick's Cemetery in Cumberland. As a widow, Mary moved into the home of her daughter. She remained there for the remaining 24 years of her life, which included a move to 939 Maryland Avenue. She passed away in the Crosby residence five days before Christmas in 1936. An obituary in the Evening Times spelled her name "Beall" and reported that a high mass was sung at St. Mary's Catholic Church, led by assistant pastor Rev. W. Joyce Russell.

  • Grandson John "Thomas" Beal (1875-1962) was born in 1875 in Ellerslie, Allegany County, MD. He married Grace ( ? - ? ). The couple became the parents of Francis Joseph Beal and William T. Beal. During World War II, he made a home on Maryland Avenue in Cumberland. He endured a parent's agony when his son William was killed in action in Okinawa and son Francis wounded in Czechoslovakia. At the age of about 86, in 1962, he died in Oakland, Garrett County, MD. His remains are in eternal repose in St. Peters Catholic Cemetery in Westernport, Allegany County.

Great-grandson Francis Joseph Beal (1917- ? ) was born in about 1917 in Westernport, MD. When both he and she were age 21, Francis was joined in wedlock with Louise Elizabeth Sullivan (1917- ? ), daughter of John and Theresa Sullivan of Keyser, Mineral County. The wedding took place on June 30, 1938, at the Assumption Church in Keyser, officiated by Rev. P.J. Morahan. The family settled in Keyser, and three children were born to this union. During World War II, Francis joined the U.S. Army and was deployed to the European Theatre. On May 2, 1945, he received a wound while in Czechoslovakia. The news was reported in the Cumberland Evening Times. After the war, the couple remained in Keyser.

Great-grandson William T. Beal (1912-1945 was born in 1912. He was unitied in marriage with Angeline Stead ( ? - ? ). He served with the U.S. Navy during World War II, with the rank of shipfitter first class. While he was away, Angeline made her home in Westernport, MD. Tragically, William was killed in naval action at Okinawa, on April 6, 1945. His remains are not thought to have been recovered, and today is name is inscribed on the Tablets of the Missing in Honolulu.

  • Granddaughter Anna J. Beal (1876- ? ) was born in June 1878 in Allegany County, MD. She married Harvey Edward Crosby (May 24, 1879-1940), son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Bell) Crosby of Hyndman, Bedford County, PA. Children born to this union were Leo Crosby, Anna C. Crosby, Marcella Virginia Henry, Pauline Seibert, Mrs. B. Woodyard Dyche and Joseph Crosby. They lived in Cumberland in 1912, at the address of 325 Maryland Avenue and at 939 Maryland Avenue in 1936. Harvey worked for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad as a railroad flagman in 1930 and as a freight conductor in 1940. He belonged to the Brotherhood of Railroad Conductors. In all, his railroad career spanned 35 years. On the fateful day of Feb. 17, 1940, having completed a run from Cumberland to Connellsville, PA, he suffered a massive heart attack and died at the age of 61. His obituary was published in the Cumberland Evening Times, and the remains were returned to Cumberland for interment. Charles E. Crosby of Connellsville signed the Pennsylvania death certificate.

Great-grandson Leo Crosby ( ? - ? ) entered into marriage with Mary Margaret Sell ( ? - ? ), daughter of Allen M. Sell of 766 Maryland Avenue in Cumberland. Their wedding mass was held at St. Mary's Catholic Church, officiated by assistant pastor Rev. W. Joyce Russell. The news was announced on the pages of the Cumberland Evening Times. The Crosbys first lived at 221 Carroll Street in Cumberland. In time they relocated to Palm Springs, CA.

Great-granddaughter Anna C. Crosby

Great-granddaughter Marcella Virginia Crosby ( ? - ? ) was born in (?). She graduated from St. Mary's High School. On the evening of July 29, 1941, in the rectory of St. Mary's Catholic Church on Oldtown Road in Cumberland, she was joined in matrimony with Kenneth Leasure Henry ( ? - ? ), son of J.B. Henry of 231 Williams Street.

Great-granddaughter Pauline Crosby ( ? - ? ) was united in wedlock with Claude Seibert. They dwelled in Seibert, MD and bore one son, Edward Lewis Seibert. Sadly, Pauline's health plummeted in the fall of 1938, and she was admitted to Allegany Hospital in Cumberland. She died four days later, at the age of 31, on Sept. 22, 1938.

Great-granddaughter (?) Crosby wedded B. Woodyard Dyche/Dykes. Circa 1940, their home was on Bedford Street in Cumberland.

Great-grandson Joseph Crosby ( ? - ? ) - In young manhood, he obtained employment with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, working in its Bolt and Forge Shops in Cumberland. On May 29, 1942, he married Helen Whalley ( ? - ? ), daughter of Harry Whalley of 401 Springdale Street in Cumberland. The nuptials were held at St. Mary's Church on Oldtown Road, presided over by Rev. W. Joyce Russell. Helen was "attired in a navy jacket suit with white accessories and ... a shoulder corsage of yellow rosebuds," reported the Cumberland Evening Times. At the time, she earned a living with her work at the Ben Franklin Stores.

  • Grandson Joseph "Edward" Beal (1878-1963) was born on Dec. 8, 1878 in Mt. Savage, Allegany County, MD. He was united in wedlock with Ella M. Piper ( ? -1945). They made a residence in Cumberland. Together, the couple produced a brood of four sons -- George Austin Beal, Lester P. Beal, William E. Beal and F. Carlton Beal. Sadly, Ella was swept away by the angel of death in 1945. Edward outlived his wife by 18 years. He endured the heartache of the untimely death of their son George in 1953. His address in the early 1960s was 547 Greene Street. With his health in decline for several weeks, Joseph died at home at the age of 80 on Aug. 6, 1963. An obituary appeared in the Cumberland News. Burial of the remains was in Mt. Savage Methodist Cemetery, with Rev. John U. Lyness preaching the funeral sermon.

Great-grandson George Austin Beal (1909- ? ) was born in about 1909 in Mt. Savage, Allegany County, MD. He earned a living as a clerk with the Allegany Ballistics Laboratory. He married Thelma Hendershot ( ? - ? ). The couple did not reproduce. They are known to have shared a home with his parents and brothers in the early 1950s, and belonged to Centre Street Methodist Church. At the age of 43, having been in ill health for nine months, he was admitted to Sacred Heart Hospital. The grim reaper cut him away within the week at the age of 43 on Sept. 11, 1952. The Cumberland Evening Times said in an obituary that Rev. L.W. Burton, of the Park Place Methodist Church, officiated at the funeral service. Interment was in Hillcrest Burial Park.

Great-grandson Lester P. Beal resided with his parents in 1963.

Great-grandson William E. Beal dwelled in Cumberland.

Great-grandson F. Carlton Beal dwelled at home with his father and mother in the early 1960s.

  • Grandson Michael J. Beal (1880- ? ) was born in Jan. 1880, likely in Mt. Savage, Allegany County, MD. His fate is not yet known.
  • Grandson Patrick Beal (1884- ? ) was born in July 1884 in Maryland. Nothing more about his life has been learned to date.
  • Grandson William Beal (1885- ? ) was born in Dec. 1885 in Maryland.
  • Grandson Charles Beal (1890- ? ) was born in June 1890 in Pennsylvania.

Son Jackson Beal (1850- ? ) was born in early 1850 in Southampton Township, Somerset County.

Daughter Mary Beal (1852- ? )

Son Emanuel Beal (1854-1914) -- also known as "Manual Beals" and "E. Manuel Beal" -- was born on or about Sept. 26, 1854 in Southampton Township, Somerset County. Circa 1879, when he would have been 24 years of age, he was bonded in marriage with Sarah E. Beal (June 1, 1856-1908). The nine known offspring born to this union were Mary F. Beal, Matilda "Tillie" Robinette, Annie Beal, Emanuel Beal Jr., Ida Beal, Minnie Baldwin Howsare, Hazel Ethel Beal and Sarah Hansrote, plus on who died young, prior to 1900. The couple made their home in 1880 over the Maryland state line in Mt. Savage, Allegany County. At that time, he earned a living as a car painter, likely for the railroad industry. In about 1889, at the age of 35, Emanuel secured employment as a railroad car inspector for the Cumberland and Pennsylvania Railroad. The family relocated into the city of Cumberland, MD, and he worked for the company for the remaining 25 years of his life. Sadly, Sarah died on Oct. 18, 1908, at the age of 52 years, four months and 17 days. Emanuel outlived her by six years.When the federal census enumeration was made in 1910, Emanuel shared a home on Smith Street in Cumberland with his divorced daughter Mary Logsdon and her three daughters. His work was as a railroad car repairman. On Dec. 16, 1914, while a patient at Cumberland's Allegany Hospital, he succumbed to death. His age at the time was 60 years, two months and 20 days. The remains were lowered into eternal sleep next to Sarah's in Porter Cemetery in Eckhart, Allegany County. In a short obituary, the Baltimore Sun said that "Eight children survive."

  • Granddaughter Mary F. Beal (1877- ? ) was born in about 1876. She was joined in wedlock with (?) Logsdon ( ? - ? ). The couple bore a family of five children, of whom three daughters are known -- Pearl Logsdon, Lucy M. Logsdon and Sarah Logsdon. Two other children died young, prior to 1910.

Great-granddaughter Pearl Logsdon (1900- ? ) was born in about 1900 in Maryland.

Great-granddaughter Lucy M. Logsdon (1903- ? ) was born in about 1903 in Maryland.

Great-granddaughter Sarah Logsdon (1906- ? ) was born in about 1906 in Maryland.

  • Granddaughter Matilda "Tillie" Beal (1879- ? ) was born in about 1879. She was joined in wedlock with (?) Robinette.
  • Granddaughter Annie Beal (1880-1950) was born in Dec. 1880. She wedded Henry/Harvey W. Deal ( ? - ? ). The couple dwelled in Frostburg. The offspring produced by this marriage were James H. Deal, Henry Deal, Mary Elizabeth Bishop, Emma Pearl Garlitz and Anna May Weslow.

Great-grandson James H. Deal made his home on New Hope Road in Frostburg in 1950.

Great-grandson Henry Deal dwelled in Borden, MD, a coal mining community near Frostburg.

Great-granddaughter Mary Elizabeth Deal married (?) Bishop. She was in Borden, MD in 1950.

Great-granddaughter Emma Pearl Deal wedded (?) Garlitz. She dwelled in 1950 in Borden, MD.

Great-granddaughter Anna May Deal was united in matrimony with (?) Weslow. Her residence circa 1950 was along New Hope Road in Frostburg.

  • Grandson Emanuel Beal Jr. (1883-1944) -- also spelled "Beals" -- was born in June 1883. He did not marry and spent his years in Cumberland. He died at the age of 61, as a patient in Springfield State Hospital in Sykesville, MD, on Nov. 25, 1944. An obituary was printed in the Cumberland News. Funeral services were preached by Rev. J.L. Stewart of the North Cumberland Assembly of God Church. Interment was in Porter Cemetery in Eckhart, MD.
  • Granddaughter Ida Beal (1886- ? ) was born in Feb. 1886. She appears to have been deceased by 1950.
  • Granddaughter Minnie Beal (1888- ? ) was born in April 1888. She entered into marriage twice. Her first known spouse was (?) Baldwin ( ? - ? ). They lived in Pittsburgh in 1944. then by 1950, she wedded her second husband, (?) Howsare ( ? - ? ).
  • Granddaughter Hazel Ethel Beal (1891-1974) was born in Aug. 1891 in Mt. Savage, Allegany County. She never married. For 40 years, she was employed with the Crystal Laundry. She made her home at one time with her sister and brother in law, Mrs. and Mr. Earl M. Hansrote at 19 Boone Street. She made news in May 1940 when she was "slightly injured in stepping in front of a moving car," reported the Cumberland Evening Times. "Police said the driver had the 'go' traffic signal and that the accident was unavoidable... She was treated at the office of a physician." Sadly, at the age of 82, while a resident of Cuppett-Weeks Nursing Home in Oakland, Garrett County, MD, she passed away on July 16, 1974. An obituary in the Cumberland News said that "a number of nieces and nephews survive."
  • Granddaughter Sarah "Sadie" Beal (1897-1967) was born in Oct. 1897 in Cumberland, Allegany County, MD. She married Earl Martin Hansrote ( ? -1958), a native of Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV and the son of John and Laura (Reeder) Hansrote. The couple together produced two sons, Wilbur Earl Hansrote and Elmer George Hansrote. They made a home for years in Cumberland at 19 Boone Street. For much of that time, Sarah's unmarried sister Hazel Ethel Beal lived under their roof. Earl earned a living as a boilermaker for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. He belonged to the Knights of Pythias lodge and the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers union. Sarah held a membership in the Central Assembly of God Church. Sadly, at the age of 65, Earl died in Cumberland's Memorial Hospital on March 27, 1958. An obituary in the Cumberland News said that the funeral was led by Rev. Frank Fratto, of the family's church, with burial in Rose Hill Cemetery. Sarah outlived her spouse by nine years. Death swept her away at home, at the age of 69, on May 19, 1967. Rev. Fratto again preached the funeral sermon, and again the News printed an obituary.

Great-grandson Wilbur Earl Hansrote ( ? - ? ) was born in (?). He earned a living in young manhood at the Celanese Corporation plant in Cumberland. On Feb. 18, 1935, he was joined in marriage with co-worker Wilma Evelyn Mason ( ? - ? ), daughter of Charles C. Mason of 636 Columbia Avenue in Cumberland. Their wedding was held in Windber, Somerset County, in the parsonage of the Methodist-Episcopal Church, by the hand of Rev. G.G. Gallagher. Their marriage was announced on the pages of the Cumberland Sunday Times. They lived in Cumberland, MD in 1958. By 1967, they were in Potomac Park, near Cumberland.

Great-grandson Elmer George Hansrote (1921-1974) was born on Feb. 3, 1921. He served in the U.S. Armed Forces during World War II. Elmer was united in wedlock with Alvelina Betty Woods ( ? - ? ). The pair bore a family of seven children -- Manuel Hansrote, George Hansrote, Earl Hansrote, Louis Hansrote, Roger Hansrote, Normanda Lesko and Sarah Kriske. They relocated to Johnstown, Cambria County, PA and were there in 1958. By 1967, the family had migrated to New Jersey, settling in Willingboro, NJ, at the address of 74 Gaberal Lane. There, he had secured employment with U.S. Steel. Elmer died at the age of 53 on July 11, 1974. An obituary was printed in his old hometown newspaper, the Cumberland (MD) Evening Times.

Daughter Emily Beal (1858- ? )

Daughter Margaret Catherine "Maggie" Beal (1861-1948) was born in April 1861. In about 1878, at the age of 17, she entered into marriage with Charles W. Porter (Jan. 1, 1853-1943), a native of Eckhart, a coal mining town near Cumberland, MD. For decades, the Porters dwelled on Quality Hill in Eckhart Mines. The couple's 10 offspring were James Porter, Fannie Porter, Thomas Porter, Edward G. "Mike" Porter, Henry "Harry" Porter, Jesse "Skip" Porter, Lillian "Lillie" Porter, A. Dewey Porter, Bertha Long and one who died young prior to 1900. Charles earned a living as a longtime engineer with the Cumberland and Pennsylvania Railroad. He held a membership in the Eckhart Methodist Church. By 1920, when he reached his 67th birthday, Charles was retired. The 1920 census shows the family in Eckhart Mines, with just four of their adult children still under their roof. Charles celebrated his 90th birthday on New Year's Day 1943, and was considered the "oldest resident of Eckhart," reported the Cumberland Evening Times. But soon into the new year, he became seriously ill and died a week later on Jan. 25, 1943. Said the Evening Times, he "had been active until he was stricken.... [He] was mentally and physically active until his fatal illness, and last year planted his own garden and attended his flowers." His survivors were counted as 12 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Margaret survived her husband by another eight-plus years. The angel of death carried her away at home at the age of 87 on May 6, 1948.

  • Grandson James Porter (1879- ? ) was born in Nov. 1879. A bachelor at the age of 20, in 1900, he dwelled at home in Eckhart and labored as a railroad fireman.
  • Granddaughter Fannie Porter (1882- ? ) was born in Sept. 1882. She never married. She lived with her parents in the early 1940s and in Frostburg in 1957.
  • Grandson Thomas E. Porter (1884- ? ) was born in July 1884. He lived as an adult in Eckhart Mines, MD, along Parkersburg Road. He was married to Maud L. (1891- ? ). They were the parents of Doris Porter, Ruth Porter, William Porter and Oliver Bruce Porter. When the federal census enumeration was made in 1920, the family was in Eckhart Mines, and Thomas earned his wages there as a coal miner. Thomas was admitted to Miner's Hospital in Frostburg and passed away there at the age of 66 on April 8, 1951. Rev. Louis Emerick and Rev. Wilbur Grose jointly officiated, with the funeral held in the Porter home. Pallbearers were William Barry, John Byrnes, Griffith Connors, David Kyle, Nathan Porter and Gilbert Race. Honorary pallbearers were Joseph Goodrich, Walter H. Reel and Claude Ward. Said the Cumberland Evening Times, "Burial will be in Eckhart Cemetery after a son, Oliver Bruce Porter, who is serving in the Navy, arrives home."

Great-granddaughter Doris Porter (1916- ? ) was born in about 1916. In 1935, she moved to Washington, DC to accept a new job.

Great-granddaughter Ruth Porter (1917- ? ) was born in about 1917.

Great-grandson William Porter (1919- ? ) was born in about 1919.

Great-grandson Oliver Bruce Porter (1922- ? ) was born in about 1922. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and the Korean War. Circa 1943, he trained at Bainbridge Training Station in Maryland. He is known to have been away in service when his father died in 1951.

  • Grandson Edward G. "Mike" Porter (1887-1957) was born in Feb. 1887 in Eckhart, Allegany County, MD. He spent most if not all of his life in Eckhart, but appears to have been a lifelong bachelor. Circa 1910-1920, at age 23, he lived with his parents and earned income as a coal drawer and laborer in the Eckhart Mines. He joined the U.S. Army during World War I, and later belonged to the Farrady Post of the American Legion. For many years, he was a conductor with the Cumberland and Pennsylvania Railroad, and held a membership in the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen union. He also was a member of the Eckhart Methodist Church. When his health declined, at the age of 70, he was treated in Miners Hospital in Frostburg. He passed away there on May 17, 1957. An obituary appeared in the Cumberland Evening Times, which said he was survived by three brothers and two sisters.
  • Grandson Henry F. "Harry" Porter (1890- ? ) was born in Feb. 1890. In 1910, at age 20, he worked as a railroad fireman. He migrated to Ohio and dwelled in Massillon, Stark County, OH in 1948. He moved to Canton, Stark County, OH and is known to have lived there in 1963.
  • Grandson Jesse H. "Skip" Porter (1892-1963) was born in April 1892 in Eckhart, Allegany County. As a teen, in 1910, he labored as a driver in the local coal mines, and in 1920 earned wages as a coal mine laborer at Eckhart Mines. He was united in matrimonial union with Thelma Kroll ( ? - ? ). The couple did not reproduce. They first put down roots in Lonaconing, Allegany County, on the outskirts of Cumberland, and were there in 1948. By 1957, they relocated to Canton, Stark County, OH. Then by 1963, they were back in Eckhart. Jesse died in Cumberland's Memorial Hospital on Jan. 13, 1963. His obituary was printed in the Cumberland News. Rev. William Anderson, of the Eckhart Methodist Church, presided over the funeral service. The remains were lowered into the sacred soil of Eckhart Cemetery.
  • Granddaughter Lillian "Lillie" Porter (1894- ? ) was born in May 1894.
  • Granddaughter Bertha Porter (1894- ? ) was born in Aug. 1896. She married Colonne Long (1897-1952), a native of Vale Summit, MD and the son of C.L. and Bertha Long. They settled in Frostburg, with an address of 125 East Main Street, and appear not to have reproduced. The Longs are known in July 1937 to have spent a vacation camping near Mt. Pleasant [MD/VA?] on the west branch of the Rappahannock River. In 1939, they spent a summer holiday in Atlantic City and Philadelphia. Colonne's name was in the news in April 1946 when the pavement near the old McCulloh hotel, and the Long building where they lived, began to sink due to subsidence from an old, collapsing water well. Colonne suffered a devastating stroke in late January 1952 and was admitted to Miner's Hospital in Frostburg. A day later, he was dead at the age of 54. An obituary in the Cumberland News said that he "had resided here the greater part of his life and was an active member of the Frostburg Fire Department."
  • Grandson A. Dewey Porter (1898-1965) was born in Oct. 1898 in Eckhart, Allegany County. He may have been named for Admiral George Dewey, victorious U.S. Navy officer during the Spanish-American War at the Battle of Manila Bay. Circa 1920, when he was 21 years of age, he worked as a coal mine laborer at Eckhart Mines. He established a home in nearby Frostburg, MD, and lived at 108 Center Street. He wedded Marie (Kamauf) Gray. She brought a son to the union, Robert Gray. Dewey and Marie themselves did not reproduce. He was employed as a fireman at Frostburg State College. He was a member of First English Baptist Church of Frostburg. On the dark day of Feb. 3, 1965, while walking to work, the 66-year-old Dewey was struck and badly injured by a passing automobile on the steep College Avenue at the intersection of Wood Street. He was rushed to Miners Hospital by the driver who struck him and succumbed to his injuries there, having suffered "a crushed chest, numerous fractures and internal injuries," reported the Cumberland Evening Times.

Son Frank Beal (1866- ? ) was born in 1866. Evidence hints that he died on Nov. 23, 1912, at the age of about 45, and is buried at Eckhart Mines Cemetery. But this is not confirmed and needs to be verified with precision.

 

View from Connellsville's West Side, home of Robert and Anna Bruce

 

Daughter Anna Evelyn "Annie" Beal (1867-1943) was born on April 22, 1867 in Maryland. On June 19, 1882, in a ceremony held in Piedmont, MD/WV, she married Robert Oliver Bruce (Feb. 23, 1857-1934), a native of Piedmont, WV and the son of John and Rachel (Duff) Bruce. The couple initially lived in West Virginia, where their first two children were born in 1884-1887. For reasons not yet known, they migrated to Texas where two more of their offspring were born in Houston in 1887-1888. They returned north and were in Maryland in 1899 and Scottdale, Westmoreland County, PA in 1900, when the federal census was taken. In about 1904, the family relocated into Connellsville, Fayette County, PA and remained for good. Seven children borne by this couple were Pearl Clifford Guie, Oliver "Frank" Bruce, Lillian B. Camp, Margaret M. Goucher, Helen Bruce and Alberta Fern Dull plus one who was deceased by 1910. Robert earned a living for three decades as a blacksmith with the Connellsville Manufacturing, Mine and Supply Company. Most of their years in Connellsville were lived in the Greenwood section of the city's West Side. In 1910, cousin Frank Dahl of Maryland is known to have boarded in their home. The family belonged to Trinity Lutheran Church, and Robert was active with its Men's Bible Class. Their address in the 1920s was at 122 South Cottage Avenue and in the 1930s was at 113 Cottage Avenue. The Bruces celebrated their golden wedding anniversary in 1932 with a large family gathering at Shady Rest, along Springfield Pike, the summer home of the parents of their son-in-law Dr. John "Harold" Dull. Reported the Connellsville Daily Courier:

The affair... was a most pleasant occasion. A marked feature of the day was a prettily appointed 1 o'clock dinner, prepared and served by Mrs. [Pearl] Guie, Mrs. [Lillian] Camp and Mrs. [Alberta] Dull. A color motif of gold and white predominated. The guests were seated at one large table, which was made attractive with a bowl of coreopsis as a centerpiece. The place cards had a gold background and were ornamented with spring flowers. Grace was said by Rev. Dr. W.H. Hetrick, pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church.... The Joy Dispensers Orchestra, of which Edwin Guie, grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Bruce is a member, played during the dinner.... Edwin Guie took pictures, including a moving film, of the group.

Robert and Anna Bruce's place of rest, Connellsville's Hill Grove Cemetery

 

Sadly, burdened with diabetes and hardening of the arteries, Robert succumbed to death at the age of 77 on Nov. 22, 1934. He was found dead in bed. Noted the Daily Courier, "Although Mr. Bruce had been ailing, he was not bedfast and his death was unexpected as he had been about as usual and not complained on retiring Wednesday night." Anna Evelyn's final years as a widow were spent in her daughter Dull's home on 512 Wells Road in Connellsville. She was diagnosed with fluid buildup in the lungs and hardening of the arteries. She died at the age of 76 on April 7, 1943. Her pastor, Rev. Dr. William H. Hetrick officiated the funeral held at Trinity church. Her remains were lowered into repose in the sacred soil of Hill Grove Cemetery in Connellsville. An obituary in the Daily Courier said she was survived by a dozen grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

  • Granddaughter Pearl Clifford Bruce (1891-1964) was born on March 30, 1891 in Piedmont, WV. She grew up in Connellsville and as a young woman earned a living as a bookkeeper. On June 25, 1913, at the age of 27, she wedded 30-year-old Dr. Edwin Bruce Guie Sr. (Feb. 15, 1883-1942), a native of Catawissa, Columbia County, PA and the son of James/William H. and Amanda (McFarland) Guie. Their wedding ceremony was held in Connellsville, by the hand of Ellis B. Burgess. The pair made a home together for 32 years in Dunbar, Fayette County. Their sons were Dr. Edwin Bruce Guie and Dr. Robert William Guie plus an unnamed stillborn son in 1914. Edwin was educated at the West Chester State Normal School and in 1908 received his medical degree from Hahnemann Medical College of Philadelphia. He interned for six months each at Reading Homeopathic Hospital and Hahnemann Hospital and then for a year at Philadelphia's Cumberland Street Hospital. He relocated in January 1910 to Dunbar, where he practiced medicine for more than three decades, from 1910 to 1942. Pearl belonged to the Dunbar Presbyterian Church and was active with its Ladies Aid Society. Edwin held a membership in Trinity Lutheran Church of Connellsville and local Kiwanis Club and was an honorary member of the Dunbar Volunteer Fire Department. He was elected to the school board of the Dunbar Schools and served for 22 years, including the seat as president from 1925 to 1938. He was defeated for re-election in 1941. During many of those years, his distant cousin Ewing David Minerd was treasurer of the school board.


 

Book naming Edwin Sr.

Stricken with cancer of the rectum, Edwin passed away at home at the age of 59 on Oct. 22, 1942. An obituary in the Connellsville Daily Courier referred to him as "a prominent physician " who was "keenly interested in and always identified with the community life of Dunbar..." His funeral service was co-officiated by four different clergymen -- the couple's pastors Rev. Dr. William H. Hetrick of Trinity church and Rev. J.S. Jewell of the Presbyterian Church, in addition to Rev. William S. Hamilton of Franklin Memorial Methodist Church and Rev. O.G. Cook of Wesley Methodist Church. Interment of the remains was in Green Ridge Memorial Park. An editorial in the Daily Courier said that he:

 

...was not one to shirk a task given him. He took pride in being faithful in his associations. Membership in the Kiwanis Club of Connellsville is an example. He attended its weekly meetings long after he knew that death was closing in on him. The story of his career reveals that the life of his home community held a warm place in his heart. Longer than anything outside his medical practice, Dr. Guie was connected with the educational program of the town -- 22 years as a member of the board of school directors, much of the time as its president, which speaks volumes for the confidence his fellow members placed in his ability. For Dr. Guie himself, death came as a relief from intense suffering -- from a malady he knew medical science knows little about combatting. For the town of his adoption, his passing is a distinct loss.

As a widow, Pearl resided at 43 Railroad Street. In March 1956, she is known to have attended a Ladies Aid meeting at the home of a distant cousin Beth and Evelyn Bird (Kelley) Robbins on Railroad Street, with their married daughter Evelyn "Honey Girl" (Robbins) Bunting providing piano music, of the family of Stephen and Emma Jane (Fuller) Robbins. The angel of death swept her into eternity on April 26, 1964, with burial at Green Ridge. Inscrobed on her flat bronze grave marker is the epitaph reading: "The dear one missing from our home. In memory, we e'er recall, with lonely, aching empty hearts, and tears that never fail to fall." In 1983, the book Dunbar: The Furnace Town named Edwin on a number of pages.

 

Great-grandson Dr. Edwin Bruce Guie (1916-1958) was born on March 13, 1916 in Dunbar, Fayette County. He spent many childhood summers at Camp Shawnee near Milford, Pike County, PA. As a teen, he is known to have attended his grandparents' 50th wedding anniversary and helped provide musical entertainment as a member of The Joy Dispensers Orchestra. He also shot movies during the day's events. Upon graduation in 1931 from Connellsville High School, he entered Penn State College but quickly transferred. He went on to earn a bachelor's degree from Mount Union College in Alliance, OH followed by study at the Homeopathic Hospital in Philadelphia and a medical degree in dentistry from the University of Pittsburgh in Feb. 1943. On April 5, 1938, at the age of 22, he eloped to West Virginia to marry 22-year-old Melda May Shartzer (1916- ? ), daughter of James V. Shartzer of 1122 Sycamore Street in Connellsville. Their wedding was held in Hollidays Cove, Hancock County, WV and solemnized by the hand of Lutheran pastor Rev. Harold T. Graham. Melda had studied at Grove City College and, at the time of marriage, earned a living as a sales lady in Troutman's Store. During World War II, he spent 33 months with the U.S. Army, of which 25 months were spent in the European Theatre. He received five battle stars for his service in Belgium, England, France, Germany and Wales. After the war's end, he took up a dentistry practice in Ephrata, PA. The family returned in Connellsville by 1957 and lived at the address of 1120 Vine Street. Together, the couple produced one known daughter, Barbara Dee Guie. On the fateful New Year's Eve 1958, when Edwin was age 42, he suffered a massive heart attack and died instantly. Interment of the remains was in Green Ridge Memorial Park in Bullskin Township, the final resting place for generations of the Guies' extended Minerd-Minard-Miner-Minor cousins.

Great-grandson Dr. Robert William Guie (1923-1970) was born on Feb. 23, 1923 in Dunbar, Fayette County. He first attended Swarthmore College in Philadelphia circa 1939. He received a bachelor's degree from the University of Pittsburgh and then graduated from Pitt's School of Medicine. Then during World War II, he joined the U.S. Army Reserves and served for two years in Framingham and Waltham, MA. Then with the rank of lieutenant, in Nov. 1946, he was posted to the Army Medical Department Schools, Brooke Army Medical Center at Fort Sam Houston in Texas. A year later, in 1947, he was promoted to captain and held the position of medical officer at Valley Forge General Hospital in Phoenixville, PA. On Oct. 1, 1957, in what the Connellsville Daily Courier called "among the prominent fall weddings," he was joined in matrimony with Mary Cecelia "Cece" Hough ( ? - ? ), daughter of Harry H. Hough of 1017 Isabella Road. Their nuptials were held in Trinity Lutheran Church, presided over by Rev. H. Wahl Pfeifer. The Courier said that the bride "wore a cocktail-length gown of champagne chiffon and taffeta. The slim-fitting bodice featured a jewel neckline and three-quarter-length dolman-type sleeves. The upper bodice was of chiffon with taffeta midriff. The neckline and sleeves were edged with matching sating binding." The couple had met as students at Connellsville High School, with Robert graduating in 1938. Mary Cecelia had worked prior to marriage as a switchboard operator for Anchor Hocking Glass Corporation in South Connellsville. Robert had spent his internship at Pittsburgh's Shadyside Hospital and then went into private practice, with office facilities in both Dunbar and Connellsville. The couple settled on Railroad Street in Dunbar. They were the parents of Margel Guie, Robert Guie, Edward Guie, James Guie and Amanda Guie. Robert held memberships in the American Medical Association, Fayette County Medical Society, Masons lodge, Syria Temple and Elks Club. Tragedy fell upon the family on July 29, 1970, when Robert was killed in what the Daily Courier called "a fiery head-on collision" along Route 711/Springfield Pike, about 2.2 miles east of Connellsville. "According to state police at Uniontown sub station, the Guie auto was traveling down the hill at a high rate of speed, when his 1969 sedan crossed the center of the roadway, on a curve and collided headon with the Newell vehicle which was going towards Normalville. Both cars burst into flames upon impact.... Dr. Guie died of a fractured skull, broken neck, crushed chest and internal injuries." As is his father, Robert is named in the 1983 book Dunbar: The Furnace Town.

 

Dunbar, PA, where the Guie family resided for decades among branches of their distant Minerd cousins. Below: the Dunbar War Memorial inscribed with the names of Edwin and Robert Guie.

 

  • Grandson Oliver "Frank" Bruce (1886-1950) was born in Feb. 1886 in West Virginia. He spent his childhood and adolescence in Connellsville, Fayette County, PA. He was of medium height and slender build, and had brown hair and brown eyes. During the World War I years, he lived in Johnstown, Cambria County, PA and earned a living as a cook at the Lincoln Hotel on Washington Street. At the age of 28, in about 1915, he married 18-year-old Thelma "Rose" Stormer (1895-1957) of Conemaugh, Cambria County. They first dwelled at 523 Locust Street in Johnstown. The couple made the monumental decision to relocate to California, and established a new home in San Bernardino, San Berndardino County. There, Frank found work circa 1930 as a hotel cook. By 1940, he worked as a dishwasher at the Tip Top Cafe. They were the parents of one son, Robert Oliver Bruce, born about a dozen years into the marriage. Frank died in San Bernardino on July 27, 1950. Thelma survived him by seven years. Death swept her away on May 5, 1957. Interment was in Mountain View Cemetery in San Bernardino.

Great-grandson Robert Oliver Bruce (1929-2013) was born on Feb. 4, 1929 in San Bernardino, CA. His home during the World War II years was at 132 East Cluster Street in San Bernardino, and he listed his aunt Pearl Guie of Dunbar, PA as someone who would always know his address. He stood 5 feet, 11 inches tall and had brown hair and brown eyes. He had a tattoo on his left forearm and scars on his chin and left wrist. He passed away on Sept. 11, 2012.

  • Granddaughter Lillian B. Bruce (1888-1960) was born in Nov. 1888 in Texas. She grew to womanhood in Connellsville. On June 22, 1911, when she would have been 22 years of age, she married 22-year-old clerk Everett C. Camp (April 18, 1887-1968), son of Charles and Elizabeth (Kessler) Camp of Selbysport, MD. News of their marriage license was printed in the Uniontown Morning Herald. Rev. J.K. Wismer officiated their nuptials. Five known offspring born to this union were Ruth Eleanor Butler, Emerson Camp, Everett Eugene Camp, Robert Wayne Camp Sr. and Yvonne Smith. Sadness cascaded over the family at the death of their toddler son Everett from bronchial pneumonia on March 8, 1920. The couple were in Connellsville in the 1918-1940 timeframe, with Everett earning a living as a salesman. Their address circa 1918-1919 was 153 South Eighth Street in the Greenwood section. Then in 1942, during World War II, they relocated to Portsmouth, VA, where he was employed by Potter-McCune Grocery Company, Colatch Candy Company and Hajoca Corporation of Norfolk. The couple belonged to the Portsmouth Lutheran Church. Everett retired in 1959 at the age of about 72. After what the Connellsville Daily Courier called "a lingering illness," she died in Portsmouth on Sept. 3, 1960. The remains were shipped to Connellsville for funeral services, led by Rev. H. Wahl Pfeifer, and burial in Hill Grove Cemetery. Everett lived for another eight years as a widower. The spectre of death carried him away on June 23, 1968. His obituary also appeared in the Daily Courier.

Great-granddaughter Ruth Eleanor Camp ( ? - ? ) - On Sept. 29, 1939, she married David J. Butler ( ? - ? ). A shower was held in her honor in Connellsville by her aunt Alberta Dull. The Butlers' residence circa 1945 was in Portmsouth, VA and in 1960-1968 was in Girard, OH.

Great-grandson Emerson Camp (1916- ? ) was born in about 1916. He dwelled in Portsmouth, VA in 1968.

Great-grandson Robert Wayne Camp Sr. (1921-2009) was born on May 5, 1921 in Connellsville. He relocated with his family to Portsmouth, VA. During World War II, he served in the U.S. Army. He entered into marriage with Mildred ( ? - ? ). Their union endured for an extraordinary 62 years. They put down roots in Chesapeake, VA and together bore two children -- Robert Wayne Camp Jr. and Diane Gossman. Robert held a membership in the Masons lodge of Churchland and was a charter member of Holy Communion Church and later belonged to the Faith Lutheran Church. He was a passionate fan of the Washington Redskins football team. Sadly, Robert passed away at the age of 88 on Oct. 1, 2009. Funeral services were held at the family's Faith church, led by Pastor Scott Benson, and interment of the remains in Meadowbrook Memorial Gardens.

Great-granddaughter Yvonne Camp (1925- ? ) was born in about 1915. She was joined in wedlock with Sydney Smith ( ? - ? ). They made a home in Portsmouth, VA.

  • Margaret Goucher's burial site

    Granddaughter Margaret M. Bruce (1894-1964) was born on Feb. 18, 1894 in Houston, TX. She spent her growing-up years in Connellsville. Margaret was united in wedlock with 28-year-old James D. Goucher (1888- ? ). The couple produced a family of three children -- Robert Goucher, Howard Leslie Goucher Sr. and Jean Goucher. The family migrated to Canton, Stark County, OH and were there in 1918-1935, with James working as an electrician, performing house wiring. Margaret's mother is known to have traveled to Canton for a visit in July 1918. By 1935, presumably separated, she had returned to Connellsville and made a residence on West Apple Street. She supported herself in 1940 as a seamstress for a sewing project, and later as a receptionist. Margaret is known to have vacationed with her brother Dr. J. Harold Dull and family in Ocean City, NJ in August 1947. Later, Margaret made a home at 113 South Cottage Avenue. Suffering from hardening of the arteries, she was felled by a heart attack and passed away at home at the age of 70 on July 8, 1964. Burial was in Green Ridge Memorial Park.

Great-grandson James Robert Goucher (1919- ? ) was born in about 1919 in Ohio. On Jan. 19, 1938, he is believed to have eloped to Cumberland, MD to marry Mary Kathryn Shallenberger ( ? - ? ), daughter of Allen Shallenberger of Vanderbilt. At the time of marriage, Mary Kathryn -- a 1937 graduate of Dunbar Township High School -- had worked for the G.C. Murphy Company store in Connellsville. They bore at least one son, Robert L. Goucher. Tragically, their son died at the age of eight months in Jan. 1939, while en route to Connellsville State Hospital. The infant was laid to rest in Dickerson Run Union Cemetery, with Rev. J.M. Somers officiating the funeral. The couple relocated to Baltimore, MD.

Great-granddaughter Jean D. Goucher (1921- ? ) was born in about 1921 in Ohio. At the age of 18, in 1939, she accidentally swallowed a safety pin and was treated at Connellsville State Hospital.

Great-grandson Howard Leslie Goucher Sr. (1922- ? ) was born in about 1922 in Ohio. He was a 1941 graduate of Connellsville High School. He joined the U.S. Armed Forces and was assigned to the Wildcat Division, with a posting at Camp Rucker, AR. On April 22, 1946, he married Evangeline Bryner, daughter of Renald F. Bryner of Gibson Terrace in South Connellsville. Their wedding was held in the Church of God at Woodlawn AVenue and Aetna Street, led by Rev. Clem B. Barcus. In announcing the marriage, the Connellsville Daily Courier reported that the "bride was beautiful in a floor length gown of white lace, over satin. Her bridal veil of rose pointe lace was draped from a coronet of seed pearls. She carried an all-white bridal bouquet of carnations and snapdragons, tied with a large bow of white satin ribbon."The couple is believed to have borne a son, Howard "Leslie" Goucher Jr. They separated in 1947. Evangeline obtained a divorce in January 1950, having alleged that Howard had "said he was sorry he married her, accused her of infidelity, called her names, nagged her and threatened her life [and] once kicked her out of bed to answer the telephone," said the Connellsville Daily Courier. She also complained that that they had first lived "in his mother's attic." Evangeline went on to marry again to Ellis Eugene Younkin (1927-1978), son of Grant William and Rosa Mae (Crawford) Younkin Sr. of the family of John "Wesley" and Ada Charlotte (King) Younkin. The Younkins made a home in South Connellsville and bore two children of their own, Barry Younkin and Susan Wolfinger. Their marriage ended in about 1958, when he sued for divorce, citing "desertion." Evangeline then relocated to Coldwater, MI where she dwelled in 1969-1975. Howard's address in 1964 was 211 Ogden Street, Connellsville. Their son Howard "Leslie" Goucher Jr. wedded Eurydice Myers and Cathy Spaugy, and was the father of Kenneth Clay Goucher and Howard Leslie Goucher III..

  • Granddaughter Helen Bruce (1899- ? ) was born in Nov. 1899 in Maryland. In infancy she relocated with her parents to Scottdale, Westmoreland County, PA. She is shown in their household in 1900, when the federal census was taken. Her fate is not known, and she may well have died young.
  • Connellsville Mayor Dr. J. Harold Dull
    Granddaughter Alberta Fern Bruce (1902-1981) was born on Oct. 15, 1902 in Pennsylvania. She was a 1920 graduate of Connellsville High School and as a young woman joined the Hospital Club as a charter member. She was joined in matrimony with Dr. John "Harold" Dull (Oct. 1, 1902-1982), son of Stanton Bailey and Bertha L. (Kemp) Dull. They were the parents of Dr. Harold "Bruce" Dull and Joyce Sepp. Harold was a 1927 graduate of the University of Pittsburgh dental school and that year went into private practice, opening an office in the McCrory Building. The Dulls resided at 512 Wills Road in Connellsville. He was well-known for his community-mindedness. He helped found the Connellsville Booster Club in 1943 and was its first president. He was elected chairman of the Connellsville Recreation Board and in 1947 organized "a successful summer season of weekly night entertainment at East Park," earning praise in a Connellsville Daily Courier editorial. The 1947 work included opening a spray pool for children in the park. In 1955, Alberta helped plan the 35th reunion of the Connellsville High class of 1920, a dinner held at Pleasant Valley Country Club. He was held terms in the 1950s as president of the Connellsville Chamber of Commerce. Harold was named chairman of Connellsville's Sesquicentennial celebration in 1956, marking the city's 150th birthday, serving on an executive committee with two of his wife's distant Minerd cousins who had been mayors at one time -- Dr. Harold "Daniel" Minerd and Ira "David" Younkin. The anniversary year included creation of a landmark which Harold had recommended -- a 16-foot-high "eternal flame monument" installed by Manufacturers Light and Heat Company. Reported the Daily Courier, the structurer stood at the corner of North Pittsburgh Street and Route 119 -- "The upper section of the simulated marble monument is eight feet in height. It is topped by a Grecian lamp and burner." During the month of December 1965, he himself was elected as mayor of Connellsville, carrying the vote in six of the seven wards, succeeding Mayor John W. Collins. He served as mayor until resigning midway through his second term in 1971, citing "personal reasons." The Kiwanis honored him in 1967 as "Kiwanian of the Year." Alberta passed away in Aug. 1981 at the age of 78. Harold followed her into eternity a year later, in 1982.

 

Above: Connellsville, PA, where Harold served as mayor. Below: Harold pictured with 2 of his wife's Minerd cousins for Connellsville's 150th anniversary -- Ira "David" Younkin (top) and Dr. Harold "Daniel" Minerd (bottom).

 

Great-grandson Dr. Harold "Bruce" Dull (1930-2010) was born in 1930. He graduated from Connellsville High School in 1948. He went on to earn his undergraduate degree in 1952, cum laude, from Harvard University, followed by his medical degree in 1956 from Western Reserve University School of Medicine, where he served as editor of the school yearbook. He spent his career in Atlanta, where he was employed by the Center for Disease Control, retiring as assistant surgeon general of the United States. In 1966, he gave a presentation about the eradication of measles at the annual meeting of the American Public Health Association, held in San Francisco. In 1969, he was part of a study group analyzing use of penicillin in syphilis treatment studies. He testified before Congress in January 1974 over whether to repeal the mandatory vaccination against smallpox for children. Circa 1976, he is known to have been assistant director of the national swine flu program, weighing in with issues such as how many innoculations of vaccine were suffient. By 1989, much of his work focused on AIDS. He was the co-author of the article "A 1957 Outbreak of Legionnaires' Disease Associated with a Meat Packing Plant, published in the Jan. 1983 edition of the American Journal of Epidemiology. He held the post of clinical associate professor at the schools of medicine at Emory University and Morehouse University. He held a membership in the President’s Science Advisory Committee on the Effects of Environmental Pollution. In the profession, he was elected president of Harvard’s School of Public Health Alumni Association and American College of Preventative Medicine and as a trustee of the American Board of Preventative Medicine. His memberships included the Explorers Club of New York and Cosmos Club of Washington DD, and he was active with the Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Redeemer. He succumbed to the angel of death on Feb. 1, 2010, with an obituary appearing in the Atlanta Journal Constitution. His remains were placed into forever sleep in the mausoleum of Green Ridge Memorial Park. In 2014, he was honored posthumously with induction into the Connellsville Area School District Hall of Fame, represented at the ceremony by his nieces Dr. Kara Joyce Sepp and Kyle Sepp Woods.

Great-granddaughter Joyce Dull (1935-2014) was born on Sept. 16, 1935 in Connellsville. She received a bachelor's degree in teaching in 1957 from Chatham College in Pittsburgh. She was joined in marriage with Dr. Robert Sepp ( ? - ? ). Their three offspring were Kristin Sepp-Wolfe, Dr. Kara Joyce Sepp and Kyle Sepp Woods. The family resided in Connellsville, and Joyce held a membership in the Otterbein United Methodist Church. She died at home at the age of 78 on Aug. 6, 2014. In a Connellsville Daily Courier obituary, the family asked that any memorial donations be made to the Fayette Friends of Animals.

Daughter Rachel Beal (1868- ? )

Daughter Tina Beal ( ? - ? )

Daughter Ellen Beal ( ? - ? )

 

Comp's Cemetery

~ Son Jacob Emerick ~

Son Jacob Emerick (1829-1913?) was born in March 1828 (or 1829) in Southampton Township.

He was wedded to Eliza Ellen Sturtz (1830-1888?). Census records show that others spelled Eliza's name as "Elise" but that she herself could not read.

Among their known children were Adam Emerick, Christina Albright, Josiah Emerick, Henry Jacob Emerick, Solomon Emerick, Andrew "Jefferson" Emerick and Jonas Emerick.

The family dwelled on a farm next to his parents in Southampton Township in 1860 when the federal census was made, with Jacob's personal estate valued at $215. When the federal census again was made in 1880, Jacob and Eliza dwelled on their farm with their sons Josiah, Henry, Solomon and Jefferson -- ranging in age from 23 to 17 -- all worked on the family farm. They also provided a home that year for their seven-year-old granddaughter  Missouri Albright.

Circa 1879, Jacob and his brothers, Gaumer cousins and others helped erect a new house of worship for the community, known as Comp's Lutheran and Reformed Church.

Sadly, Eliza died in about 1888 just 11 days prior to her 58th birthday -- precisely 57 years, 11 months and 19 days. She rests for eternity in the Emerick home farm cemetery. Jacob is believed to have survived her by a quarter of a century in a home in rural delivery section of Ellerslie, MD.

In about 1892, he appears to have married again to Delila "Lilah" (?) (1849-1921), daughter of Elizabeth Keefer. They were 21 years apart in age. They made their home on a farm in Southampton Township and had two children -- Aaron Emerick and (?) Emerick.

Circa 1911, when his widowed sister Tena was attempting to obtain her late husband's Civil War pension, Jacob provided an affidavit on her behalf. He was named in the 1913 Meyersdale Republican obituary of his brother Nathan as living in Gladdens.

He is believed to have died in 1913 as indicated on his grave marker. Burial was in Comp's Cemetery, but no Pennsylvania death record has been found. The text and dates on his grave stone were recorded in the early 1930s by laborers with the Works Progress Administration, and his marker was photographed by the founder of this website in 2016.

Delila survived as a widow for just eight years. She spent her final time in Larmer Township, Somerset County. On Nov. 28, 1921, she passed away at the age of 72, having endured the rigors of old age added to a case of bronchial pneumonia. Her remains were lowered into eternal repose beside her husband in Comp's Cemetery, with her son Aaron Emerick of Ellerslie, MD signing the death certificate.

Son Adam Emerick (1852-1871) was born in about 1852 or 1858. Sources of his birth year differ, with the 1852 date provided by the 1860 census, when he was age eight, and the 1870 census, when he was age 16. In 1870, he worked on the family farm with his father and younger brother Josiah. He died on Jan. 12, 1871. Depending on how one makes the calculation, his age was about 17 years, four months and 25 days at the time of death. His remains were lowered in burial in the Emerick home farm cemetery. No stone is known to stand at the grave today unless perhaps one of the rough field stones in the high grass surrounding a central concrete shaft.

Daughter Christina "Tena" Emerick (1854-1934) was born in Feb. 1854 and grew up in Southampton Township. When she was 18 years of age, circa 1872, she married William Albright (Dec. 1853-1920). The Albrights dwelled in Wellersburg. Neither wife nor husband knew how to write. They produced these nine known offspring -- Missouri Albright, Emeline E. Albright, Laura Rebecca Beal, Lola Albright, Harry Albright, Effie Yost, Clara Albright, Martha Albright and Lola Albright. When the federal census enumeration was made in 1880, the young family resided in Southampton, just a few houses away from Christina's parents. By 1900, the Albrights relocated over the state line to Mt. Savage, Allegany County, MD. There, in 1900, William earned his wages as a day laborer, and 17-year-old son Harry as a coal miner. The 1910 United States Census shows the family planted in Mt. Savage, with William laboring as a miner, likely of clay, and widowed daughter Martha Dorsey in the home with her two young sons. During the decade between 1910 and 1920, their daughter Martha and children moved out, and their married daughter and son-in-law, Lola and Ezra Dorsey, moved in. The 1920 lists William as a clay miner. Sadly, William is believed to have died in 1920. Burial of his remains was in St. George's Episcopal Church Cemetery in Mt. Savage. Christina outlived her husband by 14 years. Death carried her away in 1934.

  • Granddaughter Missouri Albright (1873- ? ) was born in about 1873. At the age of seven, she lived with her grandparents Jacob and Eliza Emerick, just a few houses away from her parents.
  • Granddaughter Emeline E. Albright (1877- ? ) was born in about 1877.
  • Granddaughter Laura Rebecca Albright (1878-1971) was born in about 1878 in Wellersburg, Somerset County. Circa 1894, when she would have been age 16, she married 22-year-old John Louis Beal (1871-1946). Laura belonged to the Cumberland Central Assembly of God Church. A baker's dozen brood of children was born to the couple -- Margaret G. Murray, Lottie Beal, Lewis E. Beal, Minnie Lemmert, George D. Beal, Albert Beal, James Beal, Elizabeth Blank, Clara Kennell, Kathleen Kirby, Hilda Twigg, Ida Often and Benny Leonard Beal. Over the first 16 years of marriage, Laura bore nine children, of whom two died young. In all, she spent 26 years in some aspect of birthing. Circa 1905-1906, they may have lived in Newburg, Preston County, WV, where at least one son is known to have been born. In 1910, when the federal census enumeration was made, the family lived in Mt. Savage, with John working as a coal miner. The 1920 shows that the family remained in Mt. Savage, with Louis and their son Louis laboring that year as coal miners. That year, Louis' 69-year-old aunt, widow Charlotte Keller, was in the household, probably helping Laura care for the children. By 1930, sons George and James had joined Louis in working in the mines. Sadly, John died in 1946. Laura outlived him by a quarter of a century. The angel of death carried her away at the age of 94, on March 5, 1971, when she was pronounced dead on arrival at Memorial Hospital. Her detailed obituary was printed in the Cumberland News, which reported that her survivors were counted as an astonishing 87 grandchildren, 31 great-grandchildren and nine great-great grandchildren. Her funeral was preached by Rev. Vincent Beemer in the Central Assembly of God Church, followed by burial of the remains in Mt. Savage Cemetery.

Great-granddaughter Margaret G. Beal (1898- ? ) was born in about 1898 in Maryland. She married (?) Murray. The couple relocated to Richeyville, Washington County, PA (by 1966) and Brownsville, Fayette County, PA (by 1971).

Great-granddaughter Lottie B. Beal (1900- ? ) was born in about 1900 in Maryland.

Great-grandson Louis/Lewis E. Beal (1902- ? ) was born in about 1902. At the age of 18, in 1920, he lived at home and worked with his father in a local coal mine. He made his home in later years in Mt. Savage.

Great-granddaughter Minnie Beal (1903-1966) was born in about 1903 in Mt. Savage, Allegany County, MD. She wedded Charles R. Lemmert ( ? - ? ). The pair became the parents of eight -- Alice Jones, Margaret Albright, Catherine Hite, Dorothy Lee Leonetti, Gwynne Weimer, Nancy Bertrone, Robert Lemmert and Albert Lemmert. The Lemmerts' home in the early 1960s was at Calla Hill near Mt. Savage. Minnie was a longtime member of Cumberland's Central Assembly of God Church. Minnie became seriously ill in the summer of 1966. At the end she was a patient in Western Maryland Hospital. There, she died at the age of 63 on Nov. 1, 1966. The Cumberland Evening Times published an obituary. Rev. Frank J. Fratto led the funeral service in the Central Assembly of God Church, with interment in the Methodist cemetery in Mt. Savage.

Great-grandson George D. Beal (1905-1973) was born in about 1905 in Maryland or in Newburg, Preston County, WV. He was the father of George S. Beal and Carl S. Kenney. He married Thelma (Atkinson) Bridges, who brought four children of her own into the family -- R. Galen Bridges, Robert B. Bridges, Wanda M. Thompson and Coleta M. Liller. As a bachelor, George earned wages at the age of 25, in 1930, as a coal miner. In time he joined the employ of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, where he worked for years. He also was a custodian for St. Patrick's Cemetery. The family belonged to the Central Assembly of God Church. Their address in Cumberland during the early 1970s was 313 Valley Street. Sadly, at the age of 68, on Aug. 7, 1973, he was pronounced dead on arrival at Memorial Hospital. An obituary appeared in the Cumberland Evening Times. He was survived by 15 grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Rev. Thomas Gulbronson officiated the funeral, with the remains lowered under the sod of Mt. Savage United Methodist Cemetery.

Great-grandson Albert F. Beal (1906- ? ) was born in about 1906 in Maryland. He relocated to Newburg, Preston County, WV, a community where many of his distant Minerd-Minard-Miner-Minor cousins settled in the 1800s and early 1900s. He is known to have entertained a visit there from his mother in February 1949.

Great-grandson James H. Beal (1908- ? ) was born in about 1908 in Maryland. He worked at the age of 22, in 1930, mining coal. He later put down roots in Finzel, MD.

Great-granddaughter Elizabeth C. Beal (1910- ? ) was born in about 1910 in Mt. Savage. At the age of 20, in 1930, she worked as a housekeeper. She wedded (?) Blank. They made a residence in 1966-1971 in Mt. Savage.

Great-granddaughter Clara Beal (1912- ? ) was bon in about 1912 in Mt. Savage. She was joined in matrimony with (?) Kennell. Their home in 1966-1971 was in Mt. Savage.

Great-granddaughter Kathleen Beal (1915- ? ) was born in about 1915. She married (?) Kirby. They settled in LaVale near Cumberland.

Great-granddaughter Hilda Beal (1917- ? ) was born in about 1917. She was united in wedlock with (?) Twigg. They were in Mt. Savage in 1966-1971.

Great-granddaughter Ida Beal (1919- ? ) was born in about 1919. She entered into marriage with (?) Often. The couple lived in the 1960s and '70s in Mt. Savage.

Great-grandson Benny Leonard Beal (1924- ? ) was born in about 1924 in Mt. Savage. He was 26 years younger than his eldest sister. He joined the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II and trained at Fort Meade, MD and North Carolina. He resided in Mt. Savage.

  • Granddaughter Lola Albright (1880- ? ) was born in March 1880. She may have died young, as a sister was given that name when born in 1891.
  • Grandson Harry Albright (1883- ? ) was born in April 1883 in Pennsylvania. At the age of 17, in 1900, he resided with his parents in Mt. Savage, MD and earned a living as a coal miner.
  • Granddaughter Effie E. Albright (1884- ? ) was born in June 1884 in Pennsylvania. At the age of 15, on March 15, 1900, she was joined in the bonds of wedlock with 21-year-old John K. Yost (May 1879- ? ), son of Peter E. and Hanna Yost of Middleton, OH. Rev. Knotts performed the wedding ceremony in the Methodist church in Mt. Savage. The newlyweds made their first home with Effie's parents in Mt. Savage, MD and are shown there in the 1900 census. Together, they bore these known offspring -- Mrs. William F. Leake, Mrs. Fred E. Pope, Mrs. Alvin S. Boor, Mrs Charles Linaburg, John E. Yost, William R. Yost and Charles L. Yost. John earned a living over the years with his work at Celanese Corporation. He eventually retired from the company. They held a membership in the Pentecostal Church. The pair marked their golden wedding anniversary in March 1950 with a family dinner in the residence of their married daughter Leake on Pine Avenue in Cumberland. The Cumberland Evening Times published their photograph in a related story, saying the "couople received many beautiful gifts and bouquets of flowers." At their 55th anniversary, in 1955, they held a family part. A story appearing in the Cumberland News said that "Mrs. Yost, who is 70, does all her housework; and Mrs. Yost, 74,... does the gardening."

Great-granddaughter (?) Yost married William F. Leake. The Leakes dwelled on Pine Avenue in Cumberland in 1950.

Great-granddaughter (?) Yost wedded Fred E. Pope.

Great-granddaughter (?) Yost was joined in wedlock with Alvin S. Boor

Great-granddaughter (?) Yost was united in matrimony with Charles Linaburg. Their home in 1950 was in Harrisonburg, VA.

Great-grandson John E. Yost lived in Cumberland.

Great-grandson William R. Yost resided in Cumberland.

Great-grandson Charles L. Yost was in Cumberland in 1950.

  • Granddaughter Clara Albright (1886- ? ) was born in June 1886 in Pennsylvania. She was united in holy matrimony with (?) Bryant. Her residence in 1971 was in Cumberland.
  • Granddaughter Martha Albright (1888- ? ) was born in June 1888, likely in Mt. Savage, Allegany County, MD. In her late teens, she wedded (?) Dorsey ( ? - ? ). During their brief lives together, they begot two sons -- William L. Dorsey and Floyd G. Dorsey. But tragedy intervened sometime between 1908 and 1910, when Martha was rendered a widow. The details are not yet known. She moved back into her parents' household in Mt. Savage, with her two young sons, and was there in 1910 at the time of the federal census enumeration.

Great-grandson William L. Dorsey (1906- ? ) was born in about 1906 in Maryland.

Great-grandson Floyd G. Dorsey (1909- ? ) was born in early 1909 in Maryland.

  • Granddaughter Lola Albright (1891- ? ) was born in September 1891, likely Mt. Savage, Allegany County, MD. Evidence suggests she was named for an older sister who had died young. She entered into marriage with Ezra C. Dorsey ( ? - ? ). The couple's two known children were Howard Dorsey and Martha Dorsey. The United States Census of 1920 shows the Dorseys living in the home of Lola's parents in Mt. Savage, with Ezra earning a living as a brickyard laborer. Lola relocated to Baltimore in later years and was there circa 1971.

Great-grandson Howard Dorsey (1908- ? ) was born in about 1908 in Maryland.

Great-granddaughter Martha Dorsey (1910- ? ) was born in about 1910 in Maryland.

 

Emerick Cemetery

Son Josiah "Joseph" Emerick (1856- ? ) was born in about 1856 in Southampton Township. Unmarried at the age of 12 in 1870 and again at age 23 in 1880, he helped his father with labor on the home farm.

Son Henry Jacob Emerick (1858-1943) was born on Dec. 30, 1858 in Kennell's Mills, Bedford County, PA or in Southampton Township, Somerset County. Another source gives his birth year as 1854. He spent his entire life as a farmer in and around Hyndman, Southampton Township and never married. He was a member of Comp's Reformed Church. In about 1922, he was diagnosed with chronic heart disease. Having suffered with the ailment for two decades,. he died on Nov. 14, 1943 at the age of 89 years, 10 months and 14 days. Burial was in Comp's Cemetery, with Rev. George R. Winters, of the Hyndman Reformed Church, officiating. An obituary was published in the Meyersdale Republican.

Son Solomon Emerick (1859-1886) was born on Feb. 6, 1860. His birth was notated in the records of St. Luke's Lutheran Church of Cumberland, MD. He was swept away in death at the age of 26 years, two months and 26 days on April 30, 1886. The cause of his untimely passing is not yet known. Burial was in the Emerick home farm cemetery, located along what today is Ridge Road near Hyndman. Inscribed below Solomon's name was the phrase: "Son of Jacob & J. Emrick." The marker was legible but had come off its base and was standing upright when photographed by the founder of this website in 2016.

Son Andrew "Jefferson" Emerick (1862- ? ) was born on Feb. 5, 1862 in Southampton Township. His birth was note in the records of St. Luke's Lutheran Church of Cumberland, MD. When he was age 18, in 1880, he lived at home and provided farm labor. Nothing more is known.

Son Jonas Emerick (1865- ? ) was born on May 30, 1865. A notation of his birth was made in the records of St. Luke's Lutheran Church of Cumberland, MD.

 

What's left of the old Emerick burying ground near Hyndman

 

 

Comp's Cemetery

Son Aaron Emerick (1893-1941) was born on Aug. 21, 1893 in Kennell's Mills and grew up in Southampton Township. He was 41 years younger than his eldest half-sibling. He was of medium height and slender build, with brown eyes and brown hair. Aaron found work as a coal miner for the Erie Coal and Coke Company and relocated to Ferris, Butler County, PA. At the age of 23, while in Ferris, he registered for the military draft during World War I, disclosing that his mother was dependent upon him for support. He later joined the American Expeditionary Force and served in the war I as a private with Company C of the 10th Infantry Battalion. Circa 1921, when he would have been 28 years old, he dwelled in Ellerslie, MD. In the late 1930s and 1940, he made his home near the grange hall along Route 96 near Hyndman. In August 1940, he was admitted to the Veterans Administration Hospital in Aspinwall, near Pittsburgh, reported the Cumberland News, "for extended observation and treatment." He was transferred to a hospital in Washington, DC. There, Aaron died at the age of 48 in November 1941, and his remains were returned for burial in Comp's Cemetery. A short obituary in the Connellsville (PA) Daily Courier noted that he "was a brother of Mrs. P.T. Brown of Sand Patch," Somerset County.

 

~ Son Emanuel Emerick ~

Son Emanuel Emerick (1830-1920) was born in 1830 in Southampton Township.

He married Elizabeth Brookfield (1837- ? ).

They had three children: Josephine Whelan, Margaret "Maggie" Rugh and Daniel Franklin "Frank" Emerick.

When he was 27 years of age, in about 1857, he migrated to Iowa and settled where the future town of Carnforth would be established. Said the Marshalltown (IA) Evening Times Republican, "He operated a blacksmith shop there for a number of years and shod horses for the old stage coach line which plied its way across the prairies in those early days. Later he moved to Hartwick where he continued his smithing for a number of years."

The federal census of 1870 shows the couple and their family dwelling in Jefferson Township, Poweshiek County, and in 1880 they were in Brooklyn, Poweshiek County, where Emanuel labored as a blacksmith.

Sadly, Elizabeth passed away in September 1882.

 

Tornado damage in Grinnell, Iowa, where Emanuel Emerick moved after the death of his wife in 1882. Harper's Weekly, July 8, 1882

 

Widowed at  the age of 52, he moved into the home of his married daughter Josephine Whelen in Grinnell, IA. In about 1908, he became blind and for the final three and a half years of his life "has been practically confined to his room," reported the Republican.

He died 22 days after his 90th birthday on Nov. 12, 1920. In an obituary, the Republican said he was "old of the oldest citizens in Poweshiek county and a man who was one of the real pioneers of this section of Iowa."

Daughter Josephine Emerick (1856-1924) was born in 1856 in Somerset County. She traveled as an infant to Iowa with her parents. In 1880, unmarried at age 24, she lived with her parents in Brooklyn Township, Poweshiek County. When she was age 25, she traveled to visit her grandparents in Somerset County, and kept a diary of her experiences. She married (?) Whelan. She died in Grinnell County on Jan. 23, 1924.

Daughter Margaret "Maggie" Emerick (1861- ? ) was born in 1861 in Iowa. She married (?) Rugh. In 1920, her home was in Portland, OR.

Son Daniel Franklin "Frank" Emerick (1863-1935) was born on July 29, 1863 in Pennsylvania (or Iowa). On April 26, 1887, when he was 24 years of age, he wedded 19-year-old Michigan native Margaret McNally (Feb. 26, 1866-1954), daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth McNally of Niles, MI. The ceremony was held in Malcolm, Brooklyn Township, Poweshiek County, IA. Their offspring were Edna Mae Stineburg, Lester Emerick, Kathryn Johnson, Clara Crider, Earl Emerick, Joseph Emerick and Genevieve wiese. They made their home in Rock Island, IL at some point and by 1920 were in Orion, Henry County, IL, where Frank was employed as a clerk in an gasoline filling station. They relocated to Geneseo, Il in about 1920, where they were members of Grace Evangelical United Brethren Church. Their postal address was 115 South Williams Street. In September 1935, the 72-year-old Frank complained that he did not feel well, but went to work anyway on the fateful day of Sept. 28, 1935. He suffered a massive heart attack and fell to the floor of the gasoline station, dead. An ice delivery man discovered the body and notified authorities. An inquest was held lby deputy coroner Dr. J.H. Ellingsworth. Margaret outlived her spouse by many years. For decades, Margaret believed that her actual birthdate was Feb. 22, but at age 77 she received a copy of her birth certificate showing the correct date. The human interest story was covered in the Moline (IL) Dispatch. In February 1943, for her 77th birthday, she was profiled in the Dispatch, which noted that she was "in good health; arising at 4 a.m. every morning, she does all of her own work. Her hobbies are raising chicks and growing flowers. This spring she plans to plant her own garden." She was seriously ill for the last six months of her life and died in Gradert Nursing Home in Geneseo at the age of 90 on Dec. 9, 1954. An obituary in the Dispatch said she was survived by 10 grandchildren, a dozen great-grandchildren and sisters Mrs. Charles Chapman and Mrs. Tress Collum. Funeral services were led by Rev. E.A. Schmidt of the family church, with interment in Western Cemetery in Orion. Clyde Walter performed a song, with Mrs. Dale Sieben accompanying him. Pallbearers included William Armstrong, Edward Biddison, Eugene Whitmyer, D.S. Nicely, William Durack and Jay Durack.

  • Granddaughter Edna Mae Emerick (1888-1933) was born on May 30, 1888 in Belle Plaine, IA. She married Edgar "Ed" Stineburg ( ? - ? ). The couple did not reproduce. In about 1919, the Stineburgs relocated to Bartlett, near Chicago, IL. Sadly, at the age of 45, Edna Mae died at home on Nov. 22, 1933. An obituary in the Moline Dispatch ntoed that funeral services were officiated by Rev. F.F. Gordon, and burial was in Lake Street Cemetery. Edwin survived his bride, and in February 1942 attended a birthday party for his mother-in-law.
  • Grandson Lester Emerick ( ? -1918) died on Dec. 15, 1918.
  • Granddaughter Kathryn Emerick was joined in marriage with Lester Johnson. In 1935-1943, their home was in Geneseo, IL. Their daughter Rosalie Johnson worked as an airline stewardess with United Airlines in Chicago in 1942.
  • Granddaughter Hazel Clara Emerick ( ? - ? ) married Clair Crider (or "Krider"). In 1935-1942, their home was in Brooklyn, IA and by 1954, she had relocated to San Diego, CA.
  • Grandson Earl Emerick (1899- ? ) was born in about 1899 in Illinois. He was single and lived at home in 1935. By 1942, he was married and had sons. In 1943, they dwelled in Annawan, IL.
  • Grandson Joseph F. "Joe" Emerick (1904- ? ) was born in about 1904 in Illinois. When he was about age 30, he was employed with the Rock Island Railway at Green River as a foreman. On Nov. 21, 1934, he was joined in matrimony with Alice May Wahlheim ( ? - ? ), daughter of Charles Wahlheim of Geneseo. The ceremony was held in the parsonage of Grace Evangelical church, with Rev. E.G. Vaubel officiating. Their initial address was with Alice's father at 322 North Vail Street. They lived in Geneseo, IL in 1943.
  • Granddaughter Genevieve Emerick (1908-1960) was born in about 1908 in Illinois. On June 27, 1927, in nuptials held in Geneva near Chicago, IL, Genevieve married Lysle Wiese (July 7, 1902-1988), son of William Wiese of Geneseo. The couple did not reproduce. Their first home was on East Exchange Street in Geneseo, where Lyle worked at the Tracy Garage. Later, they made a residence in Sterling, IL. Lysle earned a living for many years as a meter reader with Commonwealth Edison in Sterling, IL, followed by work at Sauk Valley College in Dixon as a maintenance man. Genevieve passed into eternity on March 28, 1960. Lysle maintained a home as a widower in Geneseo and survived his wife by more than a quarter of a century. He died at the age of 85 on March 22, 1988, while a patient in Hillcrest Nursing Center in Geneseo. An obituary was printed in the Moline Dispatch.

 

~ Daughter Louisa (Emerick) Korns ~

Daughter Louisa (Emerick) Korns (1832-1870) was born on March 31, 1832 in Somerset County, PA. She also is believed to have gone by the name "Elizabeth."

She was the first wife of John Korns (March 17, 1825-1894), son of Daniel and Elizabeth (Reiver) Korns of near Wellersburg, Southampton Township. The couple tied the knot on Aug. 10, 1849.

The Korns and Sturtz families were close, and John’s sisters Susanna and Elizabeth had wed Louisa’s cousins Samuel Gaumer and Daniel Gaumer.

Together, they produced a family of 10 children – John Edward Korns, Christina Ann Walling, Mary Ellen Whelan, George W. Korns, Charles M. Korns, Emma Williams Rowe, Ida Korns, Sarah Matilda Crouch and Alice Wright.

 

John named in the 1949 book, The Genealogy of Michael Korns Sr. of Somerset County, Pennsylvania, authored by Charles Byron Korn. Below: John and his brother Jacob acknowledged as pioneers in the 1879 book History of Tama County, Iowa.

 

The federal census enumeration of 1850 lists the family in Southampton Township, Somerset County, with John earning a living as a laborer.

In between late 1855 and July 1856, after the birth of their third child, they left Pennsylvania and migrated west to Iowa. They first settled in Warren, Poweshiek County, IA, where they were counted in the 1856 state census and where at least one of the children was born in 1857. Not long afterward, they moved to property in Highland Township, Tama County, IA, among other relatives and friends from Somerset County Their land was in the Township 82 North, Range 16 West and the southeast quarter of Section 22.

 

John's obituary, Somerset Herald
Library of Congress/Chronicling of America

While the details of the Korns' migration is not known, the story of John's brother Jacob may shed some light. Many years later, reported the Marshalltown (IA) Evening Times-Republican, Jacob and his wife Elizabeth (Beisecker) Korn:

...came west in 1857, and settled in Highland township, Tama county, on a farm four miles east of Gilman and six miles south of Montour. The family came west by railroad, but Mr. Korns sent his livestock overland as far as Carnforth, in Poweshiek county, which was as far as the public road was then broken. The first twenty acres of the virgin prairie that comprised the 320-acre Korns place, were broken by this sturdy pioneer farmer the first year he was on the place. Like many another pioneer Mr. Korns extended the hospitality of his home to other newcomers, and was instrumental in bringing to the new country many friends and acquaintances "back east."

Highland Township had only been first settled three years earlier by a family from New York. Upon the Korns arrivals, John's brother Jacob hosted the first religious worship service in the township, led by Bishop Long, who had traveled from Pennsylvania.

The 1870 United States Census shows the large family in Highland Township.

The family was plunged into grief when Louisa died on Dec. 28, 1870, at the age of about 38, having borne 10 children in the span of two decades. Her remains were lowered into eternal sleep on the family farm, and in time her widower donated the quarter-acre site to Highland Township for use as a public cemetery. Louisa is acknowledged as the "first body interred here," said the History of Tama County.

John outlived his wife by nearly a quarter of a century. After a six-year period alone, on Feb. 22, 1876, he was united in holy matrimony with Susanna Kennell (1855-1922), who was 30 years younger. The wedding was held in Toledo, IA, and news of their marriage license was printed in the Toledo Chronicle.

They remained in Highland Township and produced a large family of nine children of their own – among them Missouri Korns (born 1877), Catharina Korns (1879), Manorie Korns (1881), William J. Korns (1884) and others. When the Iowa state census was made in 1885, the family lived next door to John's married daughter Christina and Alvin Walling, and two houses away from his first wife's cousins William Henry and Rebecca (Gaumer) Gary, in Highland Township.

John and Susanna relocated at some point to Wichita, KS. The marriage was troubled, and they separated. John traveled extensively after that, visiting “all of the south-western states and territories,” reported the Somerset (PA) Herald.

In the fall of 1893, perhaps knowing he was dying, he returned to Iowa to stay. He came back “to his old home,” said the Herald, “in order that he might spend his reclining days among his children and be laid to rest by the side of his first love.”

John died in his son Edward’s home in Butlersville, IA on March 25, 1894, just eight days after his 69th birthday. His remains are in eternal sleep in Korns Cemetery in Tama County. At the time of his passing, 15 of his 19 children were still living.

Susan married again to Charles See (1871-1949). In a turn of fate, she was 16 years older than her second husband, and the birthdates of her husbands were a difference of an astounding 46 years. She died in Des Moines, Polk County, IA at the age of 66 on March 13, 1922. Her remains are in eternal repose in Laurel Hill Cemetery in Des Moines.

Son John “Edward” Korns (1850-1929) was born in Jan. 1850 in Somerset County, PA. He made the trek west as a boy with his parents and settled in Highland Township, Tama County. At the age of 27, on Feb. 13, 1877, he was united in holy matrimony with Mary Jane Morgan (May 23, 1853-1898), a native of Mount Pleasant, Henry County, IA. Their nuptials were held in Toledo, Tama County. The couple bore a brood of offspring -- John Riley Korns, Lydia F. Korns, Edward Korns and Clara Edna Potter. Federal census enumeration records place the Kornses in 1880 in Brooklyn, Poweshiek County, IA, with Edward supporting the family as a blacksmith. Circa 1894, their home was in Butlersville, IA. Sadly, Mary Jane died at the age of 44, in Putnam County, MO, on April 5, 1898. Edward outlived his wife by more than three decades. He is known to have boarded in 1900 in the home of Henry Smith in Sherman, Putnam County, MO, with his occupation marked as "farmer." Circa 1903, he married a second time, at the age of 50, to 45-year-old Alice (Vibbard) McCluskey ( ? - ? ), a native of Buffalo, NY and the daughter of Thompson and Catherine (Slate) Vibbard. The couple's wedding was conducted in Marshalltown, IA, officiated by justice of the peace B.L. Benrith (sp?). On their marriage license record, the maiden name of Edward's mother was spelled as "Elizabeth Everert." Two years later, on Nov. 11, 1905, evidence suggests that he married for a third time to Maggie (Opman) Kornes ( ? - ? ), daughter of Enoch and Anna (Haltzinger) Opman. Their final residence was in Unionville, Putnam County. The end came after Edward, burdened with senility, was admitted to the Missouri State Hospital in St. Joseph, Buchanan County, where he was cut away by the angel of death at the age of 79 on Oct. 25, 1929. He was laid to rest in West Liberty Cemetery in Unionville/Lucerne, and his hand-lettered grave marker was shaped by embedded pebbles in what appears to be a poured concrete marker. His son Joseph was the informant for the official death certificate, but was unable to provide the names of his father's parents.

  • Grandson John Riley Korns (1877-1942) was born on Christmas Day 1877 in Iowa. He wedded Nancy ( ? - ? ). Their longtime home was on a farm in rural Unionville, Putnam County, MO. John contracted gangrene of the left leg and in the spring of 1942 the artery of the leg failed. He suffered for three months and died at the age of 64 on July 19, 1942. Grace Carner, of Livonia, MO, signed the death certificate.
  • Granddaughter Lydia F. Korns (1879- ? ) was born in Oct. 1879, most likely in Brooklyn, Poweshiek County, IA.
  • Grandson Edward Korns made his home in 1929 in Unionville, Putnam County, MO.
  • Granddaughter Clara Edna Korns (1892-1963) was born in 1892.

Daughter Christina Ann Korns (1853-1919) was born on Aug. 4, 1853 in Somerset County. On March 20, 1873, when she would have been 19 years old, she married 25-year-old New York native Alvin Carlton Walling (July 1848-1927), son of George and Lydia (Miles Coombs) Walling. The couple went on to bear a family of a dozen, of whom these names are known – Alta May Hamilton, Nellie Josephine Hamilton, Alethea "Lela" Ellis, Lottie M. Haskell, Edna Lola Blanch Dwyer, Maude Walling, Fayetta Blanch Faye "Etta" Schertz McMinimee, Bertha Bell Powers, Ralph Clyde Walling, Roy Wilber Walling, Hazel Marie Dawson and Russell Sage Walling. The federal census enumeration of 1880 shows the family farming in Highland Township, Tama County. Grief cascaded over the family when daughter Maude died just 13 days after her first birthday on Sept. 28, 1884. The family relocated by 1900 to Jefferson Township, Greene County, IA, where Alvin earned income as a laborer. They remained in Jefferson during the decade between 1900-1910 and are shown there in the 1910 census, with Alvin working in masonry and carpentry. Then in March 1911, they made their final migration, to South Dakota, planting themselves in Red Elm, Ziebach County. Their farm was southeast of the town. For the last two years of her life, Christina suffered from chronic kidney disease. She succumbed to her illness at the age of 66 in Red Elm on Aug 25, 1919. Daughter Bertha, of Red Elm, signed the official South Dakota death certificate. She sleeps for eternity in Red Elm Cemetery, Ziebach County. In an obituary, the Red Elm Record eulogized that:

One of the most respected women in the vicinity southwest of here ... laid aside the cares of life and entered into the period of eternal rest. She had been in poor health for some time, but her condition was not considered critical by her family. Plans had been made, however, to take her to a hospital as soon as she was a little stronger in hopes that some relief might be obtained, but this was not to be and the end came about three o'clock that morning.... Mrs. Walling was a noble woman, modest to retirement, she effaced self in devotion to her husband and children and her home was a shrine upon which she lavished a life-long worship. The community can ill afford to lose such beautiful characters, and Mrs. Walling's departure is a source of grief to all who knew her. There is comfort in the thought that she is now reaping the reward of the long useful and helpful life, in that house not built by hands, eternal in the heavens.

Their daughters Edna Dwyer, Alta May Hamilton and Bertha Bell Powers, along with all three sons, attended the funeral service in Red Elm. Burial of the remains was in the local Dupree/Red Elm Cemetery, with Rev. Karstetter traveling quite a distance from Mobridge to preside. Alvin outlived his wife by eight years and relocated to a farm in South Dakota. His home in 1920 was in Township 12 of Ziebach County, SD, with sons Ralph and Russell in the household, and living next door to his divorced daughter Edna Dwyer. He was swept away in death in 1927.

  • Granddaughter Alta May Walling (1874-1964) was born in Oct. 1874 in Iowa. On May 28, 1895, when she was age 20, she wedded 24-year-old George Warren Hamilton (1876-1925), son of William M. and Laura Jane (Manley) Hamilton of Illinois. Their marriage ceremony occurred in Jasper County, IA. The couple's known children were Mabel Hamilton, Harold H. Hamilton, Laura C. Hamilton, William P. Hamilton, Helen Marie Hamilton, Leonard P. Hamilton, Jeanne R. Hamilton and Mona Hamilton. They dwelled in 1908 in Grinnell, IA -- in 1910 in Kellogg, Jasper County, IA -- in 1919 in Baxter, IA -- and in 1920 in Cedar Rapids, Linn County. Circa 1910, Walter's employment was as a real estate agent. By 1920, he had changed work and was a traveling salesman for a farm machinery business. The family was plunged into mourning just four days before Christmas 1925 when George died at the age of 52 in Iowa. Federal census records for 1930 show Alta living alone in Cedar Rapids, supporting herself as a servant for a private family. Walter passed away in 1948. Alta May died on July 15, 1964.

Great-granddaughter Mabel Hamilton (1897- ? ) was born in about 1897 in Iowa.

Great-grandson Harold H. Hamilton (1899- ? ) was born in about 1899 in Jasper County, IA. At the age of about 16, he was joined in the bonds of matrimony on Nov. 24, 1915 with Harriett Myrtle Hoffstetter ( ? - ? ), daughter of Jacob and Rose (Miller) Hofstetter of Henry County, IL. The nuptials took place in Grinnell, IA.

Great-granddaughter Laura C. "Lora" Hamilton (1901- ? ) was born in about 1901 in Algona, IA. On Nov. 12, 1920, she entered into marriage with 24-year-old Frank J. Pirkel (1896- ? ), a native of Cedar Rapids and the son of E.H. and Vlasta (Hasek) Pirkel. The wedding was held in Cedar Rapids.

Great-grandson William P. Hamilton (1903- ? ) was born in about 1903 in Iowa. At the age of 17, in 1920, he worked in Cedar Rapids as a laborer in a knife factory.

Great-granddaughter Helen Marie Hamilton (1908-1931) was born on April 19, 1908 in Grinnell, IA. At a young age she traveled from her home in Cedar Rapids to Vermont, where her sister Mrs. Morgan was residing in the town of Barre. They planned to work together. But upon her arrival, she began to suffer from a devastating illness and was admitted to Barre's Washington County Hospital. She remained there as a patient for nearly five years. During that time, she "had no visits from relatives since," reported the Barre Daily Times. "A mother, Mrs. Alta (Walling) Hamilton, is employed in Cedar Rapids and will not be able to attend the funeral. The mother is the only survivor." The nurses at the hospital "gave her every consideration, and the best care," said the Daily Times. During the five-year period, Helen "became endeared to the nurses because of her patient suffering, and had made friends with young women of Barre, who have carried her many presents, and visited with her often." She was swept away by the angel of death on March 5, 1931. Her remains were lowered into eternal repose in Elmwood Cemetery, and a grave marker stands at the site.

Great-granddaughter Mona Hamilton (1913- ? ) was born in 1913 in Iowa.

 

Fourth Avenue looking west, Grinnell, Iowa

 

  • Granddaughter Nellie Josephine Walling (1876-1969) was born on April 23, 1876. Just two days before Christmas 1895, in a ceremony held in Jasper County, IA, she married Walter Horton Hamilton (Oct. 27, 1876-1948), son of William M. and Laura Jane (Manley) Hamilton. The pair bore five known offspring, among the known names Pauline Krampe, Dorothy Raridon McKeever, Harriet Faye Pulis, Leonard P. Hamilton and Jeanne R. Hamilton. Their residence in 1919 was in Cedar Rapids, IA. The family was plunged into grief in 1929 at the death of their teenage daughter Jeanne. Sadly, Walter died in 1948. She passed away in Tolleson, Maricopa County, AZ at the age of 93 in May 1969. Interment took place in Restland Cemetery in Baxter, Jasper County, IA.

Great-granddaughter Pauline Hamilton (1898- ? ) was born in about 1898. In a ceremony held in Des Moines, Polk County, IA, on Oct. 24, 1917, she was joined in matrimony with 27-year-old Wesley Krampe (1890- ? ), son of Helry and Helen (Hager) Krampe.

Great-granddaughter Harriet Faye Hamilton (1901- ? ) was born in about 1901 in Grinnell, IA. When she was 20 years of age, on June 8, 1921, she married 26-year-old court reporter Victor Harold Pulis (1895- ? ) of Iowa Falls, IA and the son of Judson C. and Harriet (Hardenbrook) Pulis. Their wedding took place in Newton, Jasper County, IA.

Great-granddaughter Dorothy Hamilton (1903- ? ) was born in about 1903 in Newton, Jasper County, IA. She was twice-wed. On Feb. 1, 1922, when she was 18 years of age, she entered into marriage with 20-year-old farmer James M. Raridon (1902- ? ), son of I.A. and Nora (Fish) Raridon of Jasper County, IA. Their nuptials were held in Des Moines. Then at the age of 24, on Feb. 8, 1926, she was united in wedlock with her second husband, 38-year-old Wallie M. McKeever (1888- ? ), a native of Minjo, IA and the son of David and Ida (Gleesen) McKeever. Their wedding ceremony was performed in Crawford County, IA.

Great-grandson Leonard P. Hamilton (1910-1987)

  • Granddaughter Alethea Ellen "Lela" Walling (1878-1969) was born on March 24, 1878 in Highland Township, Tama County. At the age of 21, on Valentine's Day 1899, she was joined in wedlock with 23-year-old Earl Chester Ellis (1876- ? ), son of William and Ellen (Huckerbone) Ellis of Montour, Tama County. Their wedding was held in Montour. The known offspring produced by this marriage were Theodore Ellis, Dorothy Ellis, Thelma Ellis, Earl Ellis Jr., Ralph Ellis and Donald Ellis. Their home in 1919 was in Montour, Tama County, IA. In 1930, still in Montour, Chester earned income as a farm laborer, and their newly married son Theodore and his wife and stepdaughter lived under their roof. Lela succumbed to death on Dec. 15, 1969.

Great-grandson Theodore Ellis (1900- ? ) was born on Jan. 9, 1900. He served in the U.S. Army during World War I, enlisting in Marshalltown on April 18, 1917. He was placed within the Quartermaster Corps as part of a mobile laundry unit. He was mustered out on May 15, 1919. In about 1927, when he would have been 27 years of age, he married Mary S. Kerby ( ? - ? ), a native of Kentucky. Mary brought two daughters into the union, Mary Kerby and Ruby Henderson, both of whom also had been born in Kentucky. The couple relocated to Chicago by 1935 and remained there circa 1940, with Theodore's occupation shown in the census as taxi driver. Together, they bore two daughters of their own -- Jacqueline Ellis and Joan Ellis. Theodore passed away in Chicago on Jan. 10, 1966. His remains were shipped to Iowa for burial was in Maple Hill Cemetery in Montour, Tama County. The Cedar Rapids Gazette ran a short death notice.

Great-granddaughter Dorothy Ellis (1905- ? ) was born in about 1905.

Great-granddaughter Viva Cecil Ellis (1906?- ? ) was born in about 1906. On July 5, 1926, when she was age 20, she wedded 28-year-old George Shea (1898- ? ), a native of Fall River, MA and the son of Peter and Annie (Cox) Shea. The couple tied the knot in Indianola, Warren County, IA.

Great-granddaughter Thelma Ellis (1909- ? ) was born in about 1909 in Iowa.

Great-grandson Earl Ellis Jr. (1912- ? ) was born in about 1912. When he was age 18, in 1930, he operated his own barber shop in Montour.

Great-grandson Ralph Ellis (1917- ? ) was born in about 1917.

Great-grandson Donald Ellis (1919- ? ) was born in about 1919 in Montour, Tama County, IA.

  • Granddaughter Lottie M. Walling (1879- ? ) was born in June 1879/1880. Single at the age of 19 in 1900, she dwelled with her parents in Jefferson, Greene County, IA. Later that year, on June 20, 1900, she was united in matrimony with 21-year-old O.E. Haskell ( ? - ? ). The nuptials were held in her hometown. She was carried away by the angel of death sometime before 1915.
  • Granddaughter Edna L. Walling (1882-1954) was born in June 1882 (or 1886) in Highland Township, Tama County. When she was 17 years of age, on July 24, 1899, she married 31-year-old John P. Dwyer (1868- ? ). John was a native of New York City and the son of Patrick and (?) Boidert Dwyer. The couple were the parents of Lucille Dwyer, Lola Dwyer, John Dwyer, Mildred Dwyer, Dorothy Dwyer, Blanche Dwyer, Catherine Dwyer and Joseph Dwyer. When the federal census enumeration was made in 1900, the Dwyers lived in LeGrand, Marshall County, IA, and John earned a living as a salesman. Circa 1907, at the birth of their daughter Mildred, they were in Minnesota. By 1910, however, they returned to Iowa and dwelled in Waterloo, Blackhawk County. Edna resided in Rockford, IL in 1919 and that year is known to have traveled to her mother's funeral. Edna and John divorced between 1916 and 1920. Edna and the children made their home in 1920 in Township 12 of Ziebach County, SD, as next-door neighbors to Edna's widowed 70-year-old father. Evidence suggests that she died in Yale, St. Clair County, MI on Jan. 21, 1954. Burial was in Dupree, SD.

Great-granddaughter Lucille Dwyer (1899- ? ) was born in Aug. 1899 in Iowa.

Great-granddaughter Lola Dwyer (1903- ? ) was born in 1903 in Iowa.

Great-grandson John Dwyer (1905- ? ) was born in 1905 in Iowa.

Great-granddaughter Mildred Dwyer (1907- ? ) was born in 1907 in Minnesota.

Great-granddaughter Dorothy Dwyer

Great-granddaughter Blanche Dwyer (1912- ? ) was born in about 1912 in Illinois.

Great-granddaughter Catherine Dwyer (1914- ? ) was born in about 1914 in Illinois.

Great-grandson Joseph Dwyer (1916- ? ) was born in about 1916 in Illinois.

  • Granddaughter Fayetta "Etta" Walling (1886-1987) -- who used the nickname "Faye"-- was born on June 20, 1886 in Tama County, IA. When she was 18 years of age, on Sept. 20, 1904, she was united in the bonds of matrimony with 23-year-old Harry M. Schertz (1881- ? ), son of Peter and Eliza (Canfield) Schertz. They were wed in Jefferson, Greene County, IA. The couple lived in Jefferson and bore one son, Marion Earl Schertz. Circa 1919, Etta was in Carroll, IA. Later, she married a second time to (?) McMinimee ( ? - ? ). She moved to Des Moines, Polk County, IA and resided there for decades. She held a membership in the West Des Moines United Methodist Church. In 1983, she endured the heartbreak of the death of her only son. Her final residence was Woodbury West at 1211 Vine Street. The spectre of death whisked her away at the age of 101, from pneumonia, on Aug. 16, 1987. An obituary was published in the Des Moines Register, which said that burial was in Grand Junction Cemetery in Grand Junction. She was survived by three grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren and 10 great-great grandchildren.

Great-grandson Marion Earl Schertz (1909-1983) was born in about 1909 in Jefferson, Greene County, IA. He was but a boy when his parents' marriage ended, and he went to South Dakota to live with his married aunt Bertha Powers. In 1931, he wedded Florence "Lucile" ( ? - ? ). Four sons born to this marriage were Robert E. Schertz, John C. "Jack" Schertz, Lyle H. Schertz and Charles Joseph "Joe" Schertz. The federal census of 1940 lists the family in Sioux City, Woodbury County, IA. Then in 1942, the Schertzes moved to West Des Moines, Polk County. There, Marion was employed as an ordance officer by the U.S. Army. The work included a postwar deployment to Germany during the Allied occupation. They belonged to the West Des Moines United Methodist Church as well as the Argon American Legion and Izaak Walton League. He also held a gun permit. The family home in the 1960s-1980s was 533 Eighth Street, West Des Moines. Lucile is known to have co-founded and held a term as president of the Ding Darling Chapter of the Walton League. They enjoyed getaways at a home 70 miles north of Red Lake, Ontario, in the community of Perrault Falls. Marion and Lucile celebrated their golden wedding anniversary in 1981. Suffering from heart problems, Marion died at home at the age of 74 on Jan. 13, 1983. He was pictured in his obituary in the Des Moines Register. Later that year, Lucile was featured in the Register's "Neighbor of the Week" column authored by Barbara Croft. The article featured her photo and described her decades of teaching since 1929, when her father persuaded the local school superintendent to give her a job as an alternative to becoming a nurse and leaving home. It said she initially taught 30 students in eight grades in a one-room schoolhouse. Circa 1960, she received a bachelor's degree in education from Drake University. She worked for 17 years at Fair Meadows School on 23rd Street until retirement in 1973. She also held the position of superintendent of Sunday School at the family church.

  • Granddaughter Bertha Bell Walling (1888-1954) was born on Aug. 13, 1888 in Poweshiek County, Iowa. Two days before Christmas 1905, in Jefferson, Greene County, IA, the 19-year-old Bertha wedded 24-year-old Harry M. Powers (1883- ? ), son of Samuel B. and Ella (Palmer) Powers of Newton, IA. Rev. J.S. Corkey presided at the ceremony, in the presence of Bertha's mother. The couple did not reproduce. They migrated to South Dakota and dwelled on a farm in Township 13, Red Elm, Ziebach County, SD. In August 1919, at the passing of her mother, she signed the official South Dakota certificate of death. When her sister Etta Schertz's marriage fell apart, her son Marion was taken in by the Powerses and lived under their roof in 1920. She died in Florida on April 1, 1954. The remains were brought back to Iowa for interment in Our Silent City Cemetery in Kellogg, Jasper County, IA.
  • Grandson Ralph Clyde Walling (1890-1962) was born on Aug. 29, 1890 in Tama County, IA. During World War I, he served from South Dakota in Company H of the 2nd Infantry, U.S. Army. Circa 1920, still a bachelor at the age of 28, he lived on a farm in South Dakota with his widowed father and single brother Russell. Their residence was in Township 12 of Ziebach County, SD. He passed away on April 4, 1962 in Newton, Jasper County, IA. The remains were lowered into honored rest in Newton Memorial Park.
  • Grandson Roy Wilber Walling (1892- ? ) was born on May 6, 1892 in Gilman, Marshall County, IA. After a move to South Dakota with his family, Roy joined the U.S. Navy during World War I. Circa 1928, he was united in wedlock with Anna (Wolff) Schooley (Dec. 5, 1900-1992), daughter of Christian and Barbara Eva (Nuss) Wolff of Yankton, Yankton County, SD. The couple appears to have put down roots in Yankton. Their four known children were Madeline Walling, Paul Gordon Schooley, Ruth Walling and Jean Walling. Roy surrendered to death in Yankton on March 16, 1971. Anna outlived her spouse by more than two decades. Death cut her away at the age of 91 on July 20, 1992. their remains are at rest in Yankton City Cemetery.

Great-granddaughter Madeline Schooley/Walling ( ? - ? )

Great-grandson Paul Gordon Schooley (1925-2008) was born on Feb. 9, 1925. He was three years old when Roy Wilber Walling became his stepfather. He grew up in Yankton, Yankton County, SD and served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He may not have married, and appears not to have reproduced. After his Army service ended, he returned to Yankton and built sailboats with his cousin Ralph Johnson. They enjoyed sailing on the Lewis and Clark Reservoir and touring the Lewis and Clark Marina. In mid-February 1989 he was admitted to the Oleson Veterans Administration Residential Care Home in Rapid City. When he could, he returned to Yankton to see friends. One of the highlights of his later years was watching the construction of a new bridge, replacing the old Meridan Bridge which had been built about the time of his birth. Knowing he was dying, he had the thrill of taking one last ride on the new bridge in November 2008. Within a month he was dead. The angel of death swept him away at the age of 84, in Sturgis, Meade County, SD on Nov. 27, 2008. His remains are in honored repose in Yankton City Cemetery.

Great-granddaughter Ruth Ann Walling (1934-2019) was born on March 1, 1934 in Yankton, Yankton County, SD, where she grew to adulthood. She was twice-married. Her first spouse, whom she wed in 1952, was Wilmer Marlin Druin (March 26, 1932-2018), a native of Vermillion, Clay County, SD. Together, they produced a family of four offspring -- Cynthia Lee "Cindy" Santopolo, Jana Lynn "Jannie" Druin, Kevin Druin and Coralie Druin. The family first lived in or near Rapid City, Pennington County, SD. They relocated to the Pacific Northwest later in the decade of the 1950s. She moved again at some point to the Seattle suburb of Renton. The couple divorced. Ruth Ann supported herself through employment as a retail saleswoman, library staffer and in bookkeeping for an oil business. In 1976, she was joined in marriage with country singer Ronald Harvey Chambers (April 17, 1934-1993). The second marriage endured for 17 years until cleaved apart by death. Ronald was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force. Sadly, she endured the heartbreak of losing her daughters Cindy (Jan. 30, 2015) and Jana (Dec. 9, 2018). Ronald succumbed to death on March 14, 1993 in Kitsap County, WA. At the age of 85, Ruth Ann died in Pierce County, WA on June 25, 2019. She sleeps for all time in Vaughn Bay Cemetery in Vaughn, Pierce County. Former husband Wilmer Druin died in Port Orchard, Kitsap County, WA on March 4, 2018.

Great-granddaughter Jean Walling ( ? - ? )

  • Granddaughter Hazel M. Walling (1896-1990) was born on Sept. 23, 1895 or 1896 in Tama County, IA. On Dec. 2, 1916, she entered into marriage with 26-year-old farmer Francis Monroe "Frank" Dawson (Aug. 14, 1891-1974), a native of Story County, IA and son of I.M. and Lillie (Parish) Dawson of Baxter, IA. The wedding was officiated by Rev. W.C. Monroe, pastor of the First Baptist Church in or near Carroll, IA. In 1919, she made a home in Manchester, IA. Frank passed into eternity at the age of 82 in Newton, Jasper County, IA in June 1974. Hazel outlived him by 16 years. She succumbed on May 22, 1990. Their remains sleep side by side in Newton Memorial Park in Jasper County, IA. Inscribed on their bronze grave plaque are the words "Together Forever."
  • Grandson Russell Sage Walling (1899- ? ) was born in Jan. 1899. Single at the age of 21 in 1920, he lived with his widowed father and bachelor brother Ralph on a farm in Township 12 of Ziebach County, SD. He passed into eternity on Feb. 13, 1973.

 

Central Park in Grinnell, Iowa

 

Daughter Mary Ellen "Ella" Korns (1855-1943) was born in late 1855 in Somerset County. As a newborn she was taken with her parents to a new life in Iowa. On the Fourth of July 1873, when she was 17 years of age, she was joined in wedlock with Joseph "Leslie" Whelan (June 4, 1851-1916), a native of Elkhorn, WI. The wedding was held in Tama, Tama County, IA. The couple’s known children were George “Elmer” Whelan, Edith May Wharton, Lola Whelan and their firstborn, an unnamed son who died in infancy in 1874. Daughter Lola also was deceased by 1900. The federal census of 1880 shows the couple dwelling on a farm in Richland Township, Jasper County, IA. That year, Mary Ellen’s 10-year-old motherless sister Alice was in their household. By 1920, the family had migrated to Grinnell, Poweshiek County, IA, with Joseph continuing his work as a day laborer. Sadly, at the age of 64, Joseph passed away in Grinnell on May 15, 1916. Later in life, Mary Ellen resided in Baxter, Jasper County, IA. She died in Baxter on Sept. 21, 1943 at the age of 87. Burial of the remains was in Hazelwood Cemetery in Grinnell.

  • Grandson George “Elmer” Whelan (1876- ? ) was born in July 1876, the month of our nation’s centennial celebration. At the age of 23 in 1900, unmarried, he lived with his parents in Grinnell, Poweshiek County, IA and was a day laborer. Nothing more is known.
  • Granddaughter Edith M. Whelan (1879- ? ) was born in Dec. 1879 in Grinnell, Jasper County, IA. When she was age 20, on Sept. 6, 1900, she married 23-year-old farmer Steven Wharton (1877- ? ), son of George and Sarah F. (Ferguson) Wharton of Turner, Jasper County, IA. Rev. R.F. Chambers officiated, with Mary Wharton and Sarah Sparks serving as witnesses. Four known offspring were born in this family -- Helen/Ellen "Marie" Wharton, Ruth Frances Hummel, Wilbur W. Wharton and Stephen Leslie Wharton. The federal census enumerations of 1910, 1920 and 1930 show the clan in Independence, Jasper County.

Great-granddaughter Helen/Ellen "Marie" Wharton (1902-1992) was born in about 1902 in Newton, Jasper County, IA. She was twice-wed. Her first spouse was Forrest M. Holdefer (1905-1934), whom she married when she was 23 and he 20. Two sons born to this union were Robert Wharton Holdefer and Harlan F. Holdefer. The family made a home on a farm in Washington, Jasper County. Forrest also practiced law. Stricken with cancer, he underwent surgery in 1932. When he was not "getting along as well as he had hoped," reported the Altoona (IA) Herald, he traveled to Rochester, MN for a medical consultation and a second surgery. Sadly, there was no hope. He died at home on Sept. 21, 1934. Later in the year, Marie began attending Thompson's School in Des Moines to learn to be a beautician, and she and her sons relocated there for good. In Des Moines, she supported the three of them as manager of Colfax's Newest Beauty Studio. On May 20, 1941, she was joined in matrimony with 46-year-old farmer Louis Wilhelm ( ? - ? ) of Prairie City, son of Louis and Bertha (Russ) Wilhelm. Her sister and brother in law Ruth and Fred Hummel were witnesses to the second marriage. She is known to have taught school in Jasper County. She held memberships in the First United Methodist Church of Newton and the Jasper County Historical Society. In 1983, at the age of about 81, she went to live in Clearview Manor. Burdened with heart problems, she was swept away by the angel of death at the age of 90 on May 13, 1992. An obituary appeared in the Des Moines Register, and the remains were lowered into the sacred soil of Newton Union Cemetery.

Great-granddaughter Ruth Frances Wharton (1904- ? ) was born in about 1904 in Iowa. When she was age 34, she resided in Prairie City, Jasper County. On Feb. 15, 1938, she was united in the bonds of holy wedlock with 39-year-old farmer Fred William Hummel (1899- ? ), son of Louis M. and Mary (Strater) Hummel and a native of Monroe, IA. Their marriage license was obtained in New Hampton, Chickasaw County, IA, and Theodore L. Fritschel officiated in that location. Her home circa 1984 was in Newton, Jasper County.

Great-granddaughter Wilbur Worth Wharton Sr. (1907-1984) was born in about 1907 in or near Baxter, Jasper County, IA. In the late 1920s, he migrated to Texas. On Feb. 4, 1932, when he was 24 years of age, he wedded Mary Sue Winans ( ? - ? ), daughter of Mattie A. Winans and an Oklahoma native who also had relocated to Texas years earlier. Their wedding was held in Love County, OK. The couple made a longtime home in Fort Worth, TX and were the parents of Alexandra "Sandra" Phillips, Wilbur "Worth" Wharton Jr., James Alan Wharton and Marianne Rugeley. For 48 years, Wilbur owned and operated Wharton Service Station on South Jennings Street. Wilbur belonged to the Masons and the Julian Field Lodge, while Mary Sue held memberships in the William J. Marsh Study Club, Fort Worth Past Presidents Club and Toastmistress Club. Together, they were members of the First Christian Church of Fort Worth. The couple's address in 1957 was 4840 James. Wilbur and Mary Sue celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 1982 with a reception in the Phillips residence, and were pictured in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Toward the end, Wilbur went to live in a local nursing home. He died there at the age of 78 on Nov. 22, 1984. He was survived by a dozen grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren, and his photograph appeared in his Star-Telegram obituary.

Great-granddaughter Stephen Leslie Wharton (1909-1986) was born in about 1909 in Baxter, Jasper County, IA. At the age of 20, in 1930, he lived and worked on the home farm. During World War II, he relocated to Washington, DC in 1942 and earned a living with Capital Airlines, which later merged into United Airlines. He married Nina J. ( ? - ? ). The four daughters the couple produced together were Bonnie Marchment, Joyce Eckler, Berna Anderson and Dona L. Brennan. Then in 1949 they returned to Newton so he could to take a position with Wind Power  Company, remaining there for 25 years until retirement in 1974. They resided for decades in Newton, Jasper County. Sadly, Stephen contracted incurable cancer and died at the age of 77, in Heritage Manor Care Center in Newton, on Nov. 15, 1986. An obituary in the Des Moines Register reported that his funeral was held at the Congregational United Church of Christ, with interment of the remains in Newton Union Cemetery. The family asked that any memorial contributions be made to the Jasper County Red Cross.

 

The George W. Korns family. Courtesy Donna Londeen

 

Son George W. Korns (1857-1934) was born on Feb. 15, 1857 in Poweshiek County, IA or in Montour, Tama County, IA. He was 13 years old when his mother died. He was joined in wedlock with teacher Ida Mae Houck/Houk (Jan. 1, 1864-1957), a native of Mantorville, Dodge County, MN and the daughter of Amanda P. Houck Darrow. Their two known children were Herbert Eugene Korns and Maude Marie Elliott. He learned the blacksmithing and machining trades and in later adulthood worked in a motor garage. The couple eventually divorced. George's final years were spent burdened with chronid kidney disease and senility in Tennant, Shelby County, IA. Death overtook him at the age of 77, on Nov. 11, 1934, in nearby Harlan, IA. The remains were interred in Harlan Cemetery. R.C. Williams was the official informant for the Iowa death certificate. After the divorce, former wife Ida Mae moved to the West Coast with her children, establishing a residence in Los Angeles. She appears not to have remarried. In October 1942, at the age of 79, and living at 1106 West 37th Drive, she provided an affidavit so that her daughter Maude could obtain a delayed birth certificate from the State of Iowa. She passed away at the age of 93, in Los Angeles, on March 11, 1957. Burial was in Inglewood Park Cemetery.

  • Grandson Herbert Eugene Korns (1883-1950) was born on July 14, 1883 in Rockwell City, Calhoun County, IA. At the age of 20, in 1903, he relocated to Los Angeles. He entered into marriage with Alice 1885-1960). He earned his wages as a dealer of oil products, and their address was 1118 West 37th Drive. Sadly, Herbert died at the age of 67 in July 1950. A death notice in the Los Angeles Daily News said that his remains were placed into repose in the Chapel of the Pines, and that he was survived by his widow and his mother.
  • Granddaughter Maude Marie Korns (1885-1960) was born on Nov. 18, 1885 in Rockwell City, Calhoun County, IA. Dr. Cooper assisted in the birth. After her parents' marriage broke up, she also migrated to Southern California and made her residence in Los Angeles. Maude was twice-married. Her first spouse was Charles K. Costello ( ? - ? ). Her second husband was (?) Elliott ( ? - ? ). She succumbed to death in Los Angeles at the age of 75 on Dec. 29, 1960. She sleeps for eternity in Inglewood Park Cemetery in Los Angeles.

Son Charles M. "Charley" Korns (1860-1954) was born in 1860 in Tama County, IA. He was 10 years of age when his mother died, and he and his younger sister Sarah were taken into the home of their uncle and aunt, Jacob and Elizabeth Korns, in Highland Township, Tama County. The United States Census of 1880 shows Charles and his sister Sarah in the Jacob Korns residence. On April 12, 1882, when he was 21 or 22 years of age, he married Sarah Ann Somme (1865- ? ), a native of England who had immigrated in 1875. Their nuptials ceremony was held in Toledo, Tama County. A brood of eight children was born in this family -- Charles Edward Korns, Sarah Louise Korns, Jennie Korns, Ines Smith, Marjorie Agnes Viola "Margie" Korns, Erma L. Korns and Howard D. Korns. The couple also lost a child during the 1880s or 1890s. The federal census of 1900 shows that the family had migrated to a farm in Indian Creek, Mills County, IA. The Iowa state census of 1905 lists them in Red Oak, Montgomery County, IA. Then during the window of time between 1908 and 1910, they relocated again, to Nebraska, and dwelled at least until 1920 on a farm in Genoa, Nance County. At the age of 83, in November 1943, while residing in Platte County, NE, he provided affidavits so that his daughters Sarah, Jennie and Marjorie could obtain a delayed birth certificate from the State of Iowa. Sadly, Charles passed away on March 2, 1954 in Emerson Mills, IA.

  • Grandson Charles Edward Korns (1882- ? ) was born in Dec. 1882. He provided labor on the home farms in Iowa and Nebraska. Circa 1910, a bachelor at the age of 27, he lived with his parents in Genoa, Nance County, NE. On Aug. 4, 1924, when he was 41 years old, he married 39-year-old widow Alice (Whitwell) Watson ( ? - ? ), daughter of John and Mary (Tucker) Whitwell of Nebraska. Their wedding was held in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, IA.
  • Granddaughter Sarah Louise "Lucy" Korns (1884- ? ) was born on Nov. 12, 1884 or 1885 in Gilman, Tama County, IA.
  • Granddaughter Jennie Korns (1887- ? ) was born on March 28, 1886 or 1887 in Gilman, Tama County, IA.
  • Granddaughter Ines G. Korns (1895- ? ) was born in Sept. 1895. At the age of 20, on June 27, 1916, she entered into marriage with 37-year-old Marion E. Smith (1879- ? ), son of F. and Harriett (Sandeland) Smith. They were wed in Mills County, IA.
  • Granddaughter Marjorie Agnes Viola "Margie" Korns (1899- ? ) was born on Oct. 27, 1899 in Emerson, Mills County, IA.
  • Granddaughter Erma L. Korns (1902- ? ) was born in 1902 in Iowa.
  • Grandson Howard D. Korns (1908- ? ) was born in about 1908 in Iowa.

Daughter Emma Jane Korns (1862-1932) was born on Aug. 9, 1862 in Montour, Tama County, IA. She was wed twice in her lifetime. Her first husband, whom she married at about the age of 17, was David N. Williams (1856-1882). The only child born to this marriage was Charles Monroe Williams. Their home in 1880 was on a farm in Felix, Grundy County, IA. The family plummeted into mourning when David died in 1882 at the age of about 26. After two years, she was united in matrimony with her second spouse, Robert Rowe (1835-1916). Together, the pair bore five more offspring of their own – Benjamin Harrison Rowe, James Raymond Rowe, Walter H. Rowe, Florence Esther Remington and Clarence Robert Rowe. At the age of 69, she succumbed to death in Scranton, Osage County, KS on July 22, 1932.

  • Grandson Charles Monroe Williams (1879- ? ) is thought to have been born in Dec. 1879 in Felix, Grundy County, IA.
  • Grandson Benjamin Harrison Rowe
  • Grandson James Raymond Rowe
  • Grandson Walter H. Rowe
  • Granddaughter Florence Esther Rowe Remington
  • Grandson Clarence Robert Rowe

Daughter Ida May Korns (1863-1880) was born on Oct. 9 or 19, 1863 in Iowa. Sadly, she died at the age of 17 on Nov. 7, 1880. The cause of her untimely passing is not yet known. Burial was in Korns Cemetery in Tama County.

Daughter Sarah Matilda Korns (1867-1953) was born in 1867 in Iowa. She was three years of age when her mother died, and she and her older brother Charles were taken into the home of their uncle and aunt, Jacob and Elizabeth (Beisecker) Korns, in Highland Township, Tama County. The United States Census of 1880 shows Sarah (age 14) and Charles (19) in the Jacob Korns household. When she was about age 24, on Nov. 4, 1890, she was joined in wedlock with Jefferson S. Crouch (July 13, 1861-1927), a native of North Carolina. They established a home in Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS. They were the parents of a daughter Helen, who was adopted at a young age, and Ruth M. Crouch. By 1910, the Crouches had relocated to Muskogee, Muskogee County, OK, where Jefferson was a grocery store merchant. Then during the 1910s, the family moved back to Wichita, with Jefferson working as manager of a meat market in 1920. Sadly, Jefferson died on Feb. 2, 1927. Burial of his remains was in Maple Grove Cemetery in Wichita, KS. Sarah Matilda eventually migrated to the Pacific Northwest and settled in Seattle. She died in Seattle at the age of 82 on June 27, 1953.

  • Granddaughter Helen Crouch (1898- ? ) was born in 1898 in Kansas and adopted by Jefferson and Sarah Matilda (Korns) Crouch.
  • Granddaughter Ruth M. Crouch (1903- ? ) was born in about 1903 in Kansas.

Daughter Alice Korns (1869- ? ) was born in 1869 in Iowa. She was about a year old when her mother died. In 1880, when she was 10 years of age, she lived under the roof of her married sister Mary Ellen Whelan in Richland, Jasper County, IA. That year, the census-taker spelled her surname as “Corns.” She wedded (?) Wright.

 

~ Daughter Christina "Tena" (Emerick) Burkett ~

Daughter Christina "Tena" Emerick (1833-1922) was born on Nov. 15, 1833 at Kennell Mills, Somerset County.

On Nov. 1, 1853, when she was age 20, Christina married 21-year-old Jacob "Adam" Burkett (1832-1911), son of Jacob and Catherine (Shirer) Burkett, also spelled "Burket." He was a native of Londonderry Township, Bedford County, PA and as an adult stood 5 feet, 7½ inches tall, weighed 125 lbs, had a light complexion and brown eyes. The ceremony was held in Southampton Township, performed by justice of the peace George Walker, but with no other witnesses. A record of the marriage was written on a piece of paper measuring 3.5 inches by 6.75 inches, but it was the only known written documentation.

The couple produced eight children, among them Emma Louise Lepley, Margaret "Maggie" Korns, Melinda "Linnie" Brady, William Jefferson Burket, Rachel "Elizabeth" Kennell Tipton, Elizabeth Burket, John Adam Burket and Charles Edward Burkett.

Adam served in the U.S. Army for nine months during the Civil War as a member of the 171st Pennsylvania Drafted Militia, Company H, commanded by John Bierer. Among Christina's distant cousins also serving in the 171st Pennsylvania were Jesse Gaumer, Henry A. Miner and Charles Rose. He is believed to have joined others in deserting the regiment on Nov. 22, 1862 but eventually returned. Upon expiration of his service, he was honorably discharged at Harrisburg on Aug. 8, 1863.

The Burketts dwelled in Maryland from about 1863 to 1883, then returned to Somerset County. When the federal census enumeration was made in 1880, the Burketts made their home in East Frostburg, known at the time as "Pompey Smash" and today as Vale Summit, in Allegany County. There, he earned a living as a coal miner. The unusual name of their community is believed to have been traced to a slave who once crashed a wagonload of coal.

For decades, their home farm was alternately considered as in Southampton Township, Somerset County or just over the state line in Ellerslie, north of LaVale and Cumberland, Allegany County, MD.

Friend Andew Kennell once wrote that he and the Burketts "visited each other quite frequently and we worked together...." Friend Jacob Burkett noted that he had "been with them many times and they worked together and he lived and kept house of my own in the same house with him...."

In 1890, suffering from wartime ailments, Adam filed for a soldier's pension which he began receiving on Sept. 9, 1890. [Invalid App. #905.218 - Cert. #702.387] He claimed to have felt lameness in his right foot in 1864, which pained him all the way up to the hip; theumatism in 1870; "catarrh" of the head (sinus) in 1886; and lung disease in 1910. Their address in 1902 was Gladdens, Somerset County. The amount of pension payment he received monthly in 1908 was $20.

In 1910, the federal census shows the Burketts in Somerset County, with 35-year-old unmarried son Charles living at home and providing farm labor. Stricken with pneumonia and la grippe, he died at the age of 78 years, four months and 10 days on Feb. 18, 1911.

Widowed at the age of 78, Christina lived for another 11 years in Kennels Mills, Somerset County. She was awarded her late husband's pension as his lawful widow. [Widow App. #960.653 - Cert. 722.778] Among those friends who stepped forward to provide supporting testmimony were Ancrew Kennell and Jacob Burkett.

She died on May 15, 1922 at the age of 89. No physician was in attendance. Son-in-law Millard Lepley of Ellerslie, MD signed the death certificate. Burial was in the Comp's Cemetery. An obituary was printed in the Meyersdale Republican, which said she was survived by two sons and four daughters. In the early 1930s, laborers with the Works Progress Administration recorded the words and dates on their grave marker.

Daughter Emma Louise Burkett (1855-1934) was born on Feb. 5, 1855. She was united in matrimony with Millard Lepley (Oct. 10, 1856-1934), son of Valentine and Maria (Baker) Lepley. He appears to have been named for the popular President of the United States, Millard Fillmore, who had served from 1850 to 1853. The couple together bore 10 known offspring -- among them Nellie Kennell, Burton "Bert" Lepley, Oren Lepley, Dory Lepley, Laura Lepley, Freda Lepley, Florence Lepley, Troy Lepley and William Lepley. Early in the marriage, circa 1880, the couple made a residence with Millard's parents in Southampton Township. Millard was elected as a township inspector in 1880 and 1884. The pair moved to a number of nearby communities over the years, including Napier (1910), Friedens (1911), Kennell's Mill (1921) and Fairhope (1930). Millard earned a living in 1900 as a laborer in a local brickyard. Millard hired Emma Louise's nephew Frank Brady to work at their home in the winter of 1921. By 1930, all of the children had left home to pursue their lives, and the Lepleys were empty-nesters. A freak accident occurred in June 1933 when Millard fell and was badly hurt while feeding chickens. He was unable to walk and was confined to bed. In time he was up and able to walk with a cane but then fell again and  was re-injured. In mid-July 1933, she was diagnosed with cancer of both breasts and underwent surgery. Upon her return home, she was "very much improved in health," said the Meyersdale Republican. She endured her illness for seven months, but there was no hope. She succumbed to death at the age of 79 on Feb. 20, 1934. D.D. Lepley signed the official Pennsylvania death certificate. An obituary in the Meyersdale Republican reported that she had passed at home "after a long illness." Interment was in the Lepley Cemetery near Kennell's Mill and Wellersburg. The widowed Millard only outlived his bride by six months. Having been admitted to the Somerset County Home and Hospital, where he was treated for diabetes, he passed into the arms of eternity on Oct. 19, 1934.

  • Grandson Nellie Lepley (1880- ? ) was born in Dec. 1880. She was joined in wedlock with Crist Kennell. Their residence was in Boswell, Somerset County.
  • Grandson Burton "Bert" Lepley made a home in the early 1930s in Boswell, Somerset County. He was the father of Charles Lepley and Burton Lepley Jr. He appears to have relocated in about 1932 to the steel mill town of Homestead, near Pittsburgh.
  • Grandson Oren Lepley (1888- ? ) was born in about 1888. He lived in Boswell, Somerset County.

 

Cumberland, MD, home to generations of the Sturtz-Emerick family

 

  • Grandson Dory Lepley (1885- ? ) was born in about 1885. He was married and dwelled in Cumberland, Allegany County, MD. They enjoyed regular visits to his parents back home.
  • Granddaughter Laura Lepley (1890- ? ) was born in about 1890. She relocated to Geistown near Johnstown, Cambria County, PA.
  • Grandson Freda Lepley (1893- ? ) was born in about 1893. She married (?) Orris. The pair were the parents of at least two offspring. They resided in 1922 in Johnstown, Cambria County, PA.
  • Grandson Florence Lepley (1895- ? ) was born in about 1895. Florence migrated to Massachusetts and was there in 1934.
  • Grandson Troy E. Lepley (1896- ? ) was born in about 1896. He moved to Pittsburgh.
  • Grandson William C. Lepley (1899- ? ) was born in about 1899. He relocated to Pittsburgh.

Daughter Melinda "Linnie" Burkett (1856-1942) was born in Jan. 1856. In about 1877, when she would have been 20 years of age, she entered into marriage with Owen Brady (Dec. 1852-1940). The couple dwelled in 1900 in the Ocean District of Allegany County, MD, where Owen labored as a plasterer. Later, they moved across the state line to Fairhope, Somerset County. Eight children produced by this union were Hilda Caldwell, John Brady, Francis "Frank" Brady, Thomas Brady, Charles Brady, Mrs. Berman Carpenter, Lily Walker and Minnie Eck Paugh. Toward the end, Owen went to live with his married daughter Mrs. Geoffrey Caldwell at 206 Maryland Avenue in Cumberland. He died there at the age of 87 on Feb. 3, 1940. An obituary was published in the Cumberland News, which said that his survivors were counted as six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Melinda joined him in death two years later in 1942. The couple sleep together in Hyndman Cemetery.

  • Grandson John Brady (1878- ? ) was born in Dec. 1878. He worked in Greensburg, Westmoreland County, PA in 1922. He resided in Kennell's Mill, PA in 1940.
  • Grandson Francis "Frank" Brady (1880-1961) was born in May 1880 in Fairhope, Somerset County. Circa 1921, he was named in the gossip columns of the Meyersdale Republican when hired to work at the home of his uncle Millard Lepley near Kennell's Mill. Within the year he relocated to work in Greensburg, Westmoreland County, PA and was there in 1922. He lived in 1940 in Kennell's Mill, PA. As his health declined, he was admitted as a patient to Memorial Hospital in Cumberland. Death cut him away there at the age of 81 on Dec. 7, 1961. The remains were lowered into the sacred earth of Comp's Cemetery, with Rev. J.L. Tenny preaching the funeral service at Comp's Church. His obituary appeared in the Cumberland News.
  • Granddaughter Mary Brady (1881- ? ) was born in Dec. 1881.
  • Granddaughter Lily/Lillie Brady (1883- ? ) was born in Aug. 1883. She was joined in wedlock with (?) Brown. The Browns resided in 1917 in Cumberland. Eventually she married again to J.S. Walker ( ? - ? ). The Walkers migrated to Cleveland, OH and remained there as of 1969.
  • Grandson Thomas Brady (1886?-1954) was born in Oct. 1886. He made his home in Cumberland, MD in 1924. In time he relocated to Cleveland, OH. Tragedy struck on May 28, 1954, when the 67-year-old Thomas was killed "instantly ... in a hit and run accident," reported the Cumberland News. His sister Minnie Paugh and niece Ronelda Sapp traveled from Cumberland to attend the funeral service.
  • Grandson Charles H. Brady (1890- ? ) was born in March 1890. He was employed in 1922 in Greensburg, Westmoreland County, PA and in Cumberland, MD in 1924. He joined the U.S. Army and in 1940 was deployed to the Philippines. After leaving the military, he established his residence in Brooklyn, NY, and is known to have been there in 1961-1966.
  • Granddaughter (?) Brady married Berman Carpenter. They planted themselves by 1917 in Hyndman, Bedford County.
  • Granddaughter Minnie Lee Brady (1895-1969) was born on Feb. 10, 1895 or 1896. She was married twice over the years. She first was united in matrimony with John Eck (1885- ? ). The Ecks dwelled in Fairhope, Somerset County, and in 1920 their 10-year-old nephew Cecil Perdew was in their household. John is known to have worked circa 1922 in Greensburg, Westmoreland County, PA. In time, she was united in the bonds of marriage with Oliver C. Paugh ( ? - ? ), at times misspelled as "Pugh." In about 1954, she moved to Keyser, Mineral County, WV. In her later years she was burdened with diabetes, an enlarged thyroid and hardening of the arteries. Minnie surrendered to death at the age of 73, at home, on Oct. 21, 1969. The Cumberland News carried an obituary. Her remains were transported to Cumberland for a viewing and thence into Pennsylvania for burial in Hyndman, Bedford County.
  • Granddaughter Hilda Brady (1899-1966) was born on March 9, 1899 in Fairhope, Somerset County. She was wedded twice. Her first husband was (?). Together, they bore two daughters, Ronelda Sapp and Mrs. Shirley Ward Irons. Later, she was joined in marriage with Geoffrey/Godfrey Arthur Caldwell ( ? -1962), son of Joseph Caldwell of Pratt, MD. The couple's address in 1940 was 206 Maryland Avenue in Cumberland, MD. By 1962, they had moved to another address on the same street, 304 Marland Avenue. Geoffrey earned a living through his work as a mechanic for the Kelly-Springfield Tire Company, a position from which he eventually retired. He belonged the local aerie of the Eagles. Sadness blanketed the family when Geoffrey passed into eternity on May 12, 1962. His funeral was conducted by Rev. Jacob Snyder, with burial following in Hyndman Cemetery. An obituary appeared in the Cumberland News. Hilda continued to live as a widow in Cumberland at 19 Humbird Street. She suffered from that time with hardening of the arteries and bronchial asthma. While in Centerville, Cumberland Valley Township, Bedford County, she was stricken with a massive heart attack and died instantly at age 67 on June 6, 1966. Rev. Ervin W. Mason Sr., of the Cumberland Valley Assembly of God Church, presided over the funeral. An obituary in the News said her survivors included three grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

Great-granddaughter Ronelda married George Sapp. She was in Cumberland, MD in 1962.

Great-granddaughter Shirley wedded (?) Ward. Her home in 1962 was in Johnstown, Cambria County, PA. By 1966, her married name was "Irons," and she resided in Cumberland, MD.

 

Cook Cemetery, Wellersburg

Daughter Mary Margaret "Maggie" Burkett (1858-1933) was born on Jan. 29, 1858 in Vale Summit, Allegany County, MD, a small coal mining community south of Frostburg and Eckhart Mines. In 1887, when she was about the age of 29, she is believed to have been united in the bonds of holy matrimony with Jacob Albert Korns (Sept. 1859 -1918?). The Korns family made their home in neighboring Fayette County, PA in 1896 -- then moved to Sand Patch, Larimer Township, where they resided in 1900 -- and later migrated to Southampton Township, Somerset County. The couple's seven known offspring were A. Clayton Korns, M. Joseph Korns, M. Orpha Korns, Cynthia Korns, Mahlon Korns, Commodore "Dewey" Korns and Sherman Korns. Jacob earned a living as a teamster in 1900, working in and around Sand Patch near Meyersdale. The federal census enumeration of 1910 shows the family in Southampton Township, living next door to Margaret's aged parents. At that time, Jacob labored on the home farm, assisted in the never-ending work by his 15-year-old son Mahlon. In February 1911, Margaret is known to have been present with her aged father when he died. Evidence suggests that Jacob succumbed to death in 1918, at the age of about 59. The details have not yet been discovered. His widow lived on for 15 more years and remained in or around Gladdens, Southampton Township. When the United States Census counts were made in 1920 and 1930, Margaret shared her home with her bachelor sons Mahlon and Sherman. Circa 1920, Margaret's eight-year-old granddaughter Eva (or "Emma") was in the household. At the death of Margaret's mother in 1922, she received a bequest of $25 in cash from the estate. The 1930 census shows Mahlon earning income as a laborer at odd jobs and Sherman appearing to manage the home farm. Suffering from chronic heart disease, Margaret's health began to plummet in the spring of 1933. A gossip column notice in the Meyersdale Republican said she was "on the sick list." She passed away at the age of 75 on April 21, 1933. Funeral services were held in the family home, conducted by Rev. Evans. Burial was in Cook Cemetery, with an obituary appearing in the Republican. Inscribed at the top of their grave marker are the words "Meet me in Heaven."

  • Grandson A. Clayton Korns (1888-1936) was born in April 1888. He was married and the father of two sons, Elwood Korns and Luther Korns. In young manhood he dwelled in Gladdens, Southampton Township and is known to have made money hauling lumber to nearby Ellerslie, MD. Circa June 1911, when he would have been age 23, he migrated to Akron, OH to work in one of the city's large rubber factories. But in the late summer, "owing to the approach of the dull season for rubber tires," reported the Meyersdale Republican, he returned home as his services "were no longer needed." As his health failed, he was admitted to Cumbeland's Allegany Hospital, where he slipped away in Feb. 1936. An obituary in the Republican said that his remains were lowered under the sod in Cook Cemetery near Wellersburg.

Great-grandson Elwood Korns was in Corriganville, MD in 1936.

Great-grandson Luther Korns dwelled in 1936 in Corriganville, MD.

  • Grandson M. Joseph Korns (1889- ? ) was born in July 1889. His home in 1933 was in Stringtown, PA and in 1936 was in Ellerslie, MD.
  • Granddaughter M. Orpha Korns (1891-1924) was born on April 27, 1891. She appears not to have been married. During the winter of 1924, Orpha became seriously ill. A Feb. 7, 1924 article in the gossip columns of the Meyersdale Republican noted that she was "still on the sick list." Death overtook her at the age of 32 on Feb. 19, 1924. Burial of her remains was in Cook Cemetery near Wellersburg. No obituary is known to have been printed.

 

Brother and sister graves, Cook Cemetery, Wellersburg

 

  • Granddaughter Cynthia Korns (1892- ? ) was born in Dec. 1892. She entered into wedlock with Wesley Eugene Llewellyn ( ? -1976), son of Elijah H. and Julia (Keiling) Lewellyn of Gilmore, MD. Wesley served in the U.S. Army during World War I. The couple established a home in Rawlings, MD where they were dairy farmers and held a membership in the Cumberland Gospel Hall. Upon retirement, circa 1976, they dwelled along Bedford Road in Cumberland. They were the parents of nine -- Evelyn E. Vought Muhr, Nellie Lohr, Margaret Claycomb, Mary Swanger, Edmund E. "Gene" Llewellyn, William W. Llewellyn, James R. "Bob" Llewellyn, Russell "Dave" Llewellyn and Joseph H. Llewellyn. Sadness cascaded over the family when Wesley, hospitalized at Sacred Heart Hospital in Cumberland, passed away at the age of 82 on March 28, 1976. An obituary in the Cumberland News said that Evangelist Robert I. Surgenor would preach, with burial in Sunset Memorial Park, and that pallbearers included William Knieriem, William Deatelhauser, Earl Harrison, Clarence U. Llewellyn, Granville Collins and Robert Delozier. He was survived by 23 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

Great-granddaughter Evelyn E. Llewellyn ( ? -2000) was twice-wed. Her first spouse was Lloyd Vought. Her second husband was G. Herbert Muhr Sr. She did not reproduce with either husband, but became the step-mother of G. Herbert Korns Jr. and Rita Kiernan. Evelyn passed away on March 5, 2000. Her obituary was printed in the Baltimore Sun. Burial was in Lorraine Park Cemetery.

Great-granddaughter Nellie Llewellyn married (?) Lohr. Her home in 1976 was in Frostburg, MD.

Great-granddaughter Margaret Llewellyn wedded (?) Claycomb. The couple relocated to Lorain, OH.

Great-granddaughter Mary Llewellyn was joined in matrimony with (?) Swanger. She was in Cumberland in the mid-1970s.

Great-grandson Edmund E. "Gene" Llewellyn was in Bedford Valley, PA in 1976.

Great-grandson William W. Llewellyn dwelled in Rawlings, MD.

Great-grandson James R. "Bob" Llewellyn made his home along Bedford Road, Cumberland.

Great-grandson Russell "Dave" Llewellyn put down roots in Bedford Valley, PA.

Great-grandson Joseph H. Llewellyn lived along Bedford Road in Cumberland.

 

Mahlon Korns' workplace, Kelly-Springfield Tire in Cumberland, MD

 

  • Grandson Mahlon Korns (1895-1976) was born on Oct. 5, 1895 in Wellersburg, Southampton County, PA. He grew up on the home farm in the township and, in 1910, at the age of 15, worked as a farm laborer. He served in the U.S. Army during World War I. After the completion of his service, he earned a living through employment at Kelly-Springfield Tire Company and Cumberland Cement and Supply Company, both located across the state border in Cumbeland, MD. He was unmarried and resided at home in the mid-1930s. He was admitted to the Veterans Administration Hospital in Altoona, PA and died there at the age of 81 in Nov. 1976. An obituary appeared in the Meyersdale Republican and Bedford County Press, which noted that Rev. Kenneth L. Korns preached the funeral sermon. The remains lie in eternal repose in Palo Alto Cemetery near Hyndman.
  • Grandson Commodore "Dewey" Korns (1896-1953) was born on May 27, 1896/1897 in Fayette County, PA. He married Ethel Mostoller Ringler (Nov. 6, 1897-1991), daughter of Albert and Clara (Mostoller) Ringler of Somerset Township, Somerset County, PA. Together, the couple produced three offspring -- Woodrow Korns, Thurman Korns and Audrey Buchanan. He was in Berlin, Somerset County in 1933. He relocated to Somerset, the seat of Somerset County, PA, where he lived in 1936, and thence to Friedens, Somerset County, as of the early 1950s. His occupation over the years was coal mining. Ethel was a member of the Assembly of God Church in Midlothian, MD. Grief enveloped the family when Dewey was stricken with a cerebral hemorrhage and admitted to Somerset Community Hospital. Four days later, death cut him away at the age of 56 on Sept. 8, 1953. Thurman Korns of Stoystown, Somerset County signed the official Pennsylvania certificate of death. The remains were interred in the Odd Fellows Cemetery in Stoystown. Obituaries were published in the Bedford Gazette and Somerset Daily American, and a short death notice in the Connellsville Daily Courier. Ethel outlived her spouse and in the mid-1950s made a home in College Park, MD. Then in 1955, she relocated to the West Coast, settling in Gardena, Los Angeles County, CA. She spent several months during the early summer of 1957 visiting with her children in Somerset County before flying home. In time she returned to Somerset for good. She was admitted to Somerset Hospital and died there at the age of 93 on March 27, 1991. Rev. Thomas A. Topar led the funeral service, with burial in the Odd Fellows Cemetery of Stoystown, and an obituary printed in the Somerset Daily American. Her survivors included 10 grandchildren, 16 great-grandchildren and one great-great grandchild.

Great-grandson Woodrow J. Korns (1916-1994) was born on July 17, 1916 in Frostburg, MD. He was joined in matrimony with Betty Eileen Yoder ( ? -1975). Their family of children were James Korns, Becky Korns, Malinda Whitley and Jack Korns. During World War II, Woodrow served in the U.S. Navy. He went on to a career as a coal miner and certified welder and pipefitter. He belonged to the Veterans of Foreign Wars post in Somerset and the Jennerstown Road and Gun Club. The family dwelled in Somerset, PA. Sadly, Betty Eileen died in 1975. Woodrow's final years were spent in Boswell, Somerset County. The spectre of death spirited him away at home at the age of 78 on Oct. 17, 1994. The remains were cremated. His obituary was published in the Somerset Daily American. His survivors included 11 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

Great-grandson Thurman Korns was united in wedlock with Faye Lambert. They made their home for decades in Stoystown, Somerset County.

Great-granddaughter Audrey Korns married Vernon Buchanan. They were in Johnstown, Cambria County, PA in 1953. By 1991, they had migrated crross-state to Fairless Hills, Bucks County, PA.

  • Grandson Sherman Korns (1902- ? ) was born in about 1902. A bachelor in 1933, he appears to have managed his mother's farm at that time. He may have remained on the home farm for decades. In 1976, he was named in the obituary of his brother Mahlon.

Son William Jefferson Burkett (1866-1955) was born on July 25, 1866 in Maryland. In about 1889, at the age of 23, he entered into matrimony with Margaret Jane "Maggie" McFarland (March 1868-1928), daughter of John and Elizabeth J. (Loar) McFarland. At least four offspring were born into this family -- Leah May Fatkin, Earl Burkett, William Carl Burkett and Della M. Scouler. When the federal census enumeration was made in 1900, the Burketts dwelled in Vale Summit, Allegany County, MD, where he earned his wages as a coal miner. By 1920, he had begun working for the Luke Paper Mills. Circa 1922, their home was in Pumpie, MD, thought actually to be East Frostburg, known at the time as "Pompey Smash" and today as Vale Summit, in Allegany County. William continued his laborers as a miner into 1910, at which time his son Carl also worked as a coal miner. Sadly, Margaret Jane passed away in 1928. Interment was in Eckhart Mines Cemetery. The 1930 federal census lists William as a coal miner and sharing a home in Eckhart Mines with son Earl and daughter-in-law Pearl. Eventually he relocated to Canton, Stark County, OH. He died in Canton at the age of 89 on Sept. 19, 1955. His remains were transported back to Cumberland for burial in Eckhart Mines Cemetery. Officiating at the funeral service was Rev. Donald A. Vosseler, of the First English Baptist Church. A funeral notice was printed in the Cumberland News.

  • Granddaughter Leah May Burkett (1889- ? ) was born on New Year's Eve 1889 in Loarville, Allegany County, MD. She was united in wedlock with William Gladstone Fatkin (March 21, 1887-1954), a native of Vale Summit, Allegany County, and the son of William and Betty (Long) Fatkin. William is believed to have been named for the famed William Ewart Gladstone, prime minister of Great Britain from 1868 to 1894. Together, the pair produced a brood of four children -- Kathryn Fatkin, William Marshall Fatkin, Louis A. Fatkin and Elaine Cheshire. William earned a living as a school teacher. Some of the schools where he taught in his early career were Cresaptown, Miller Mines, Loartown, Cumberland's East Side and Midland. The United States Census of 1920 shows the family in the village of Luke, Allegany County, along Bloomington Road, and with Leah's parents and unmarried sister Della under their roof. He served as principal of the Luke grade school for 35 years. He served a term as president of the Allegany County Elementary Schools Association and as president of the board of trustees of the Teachers Relief Fund of Allegany County. He was a talented piano player and taught privately in his free time. Their address in Luke was Mullen Avenue. On the fateful day of Sept. 2, 1954, while attending a board of stewards meeting in Trinity Church in Piedmont, Mineral County, WV, William suffered a heart attack and was dead in an hour. Reported the Cumberland News, "After he gave a brief talk concerning the Sunday School and church, he sat down and shortly afterward fell from his chair. A physician was summoned but he was reported dead before the doctor arrived." Rev. Clyde W. Ash officiated the funeral. Leah May survived for another 33 years as a widow. She succumbed to death at the age of 97, in Westernport, Allegany County, on June 19, 1987. Her remains were placed next to her husband's in the earth of Philos Cemetery in Westernport.

Great-granddaughter Kathryn M. Fatkin (1910-1984) was born in about 1910. She wedded (?) Ortenzio ( ? - ? ). Their home in 1954 was in Hyattsville, MD on the outskirts of Washington, DC.

Great-grandson William Marshall Fatkin (1915-1970) was born in about 1915. He resided in 1954 in Steubenville, OH.

Great-grandson Louis A. Fatkin (1918-1993) was born in 1918. He joined the U.S. Army during World War II and first served with the Americal Division in the Pacific Theatre. Then in 1943 he was commissioned as a first lieutenant and transferred to the European Theatre, where he saw action in France and Germany. After the war, he received degrees from Potomac State College and the University of Maryland. He then received a law degree from Wake Forest University School of Law. Louis then established his practice in Cumberland in 1949. He is known to have been elected president of the Allegany County Bar Association in June 1974. Louis was joined in marital union with Margaret B. ( ? - ? ). The couple produced three children -- Margaret W. Fatkin, Louis A. Fatkin Jr. and Norleah Fatkin.

Great-granddaughter Betty Elaine Fatkin (1921-2010) was born in 1921. She married (?) Cheshire. In the mid-1950s, she dwelled in Piedmont, Mineral County.

 

West side of Cumberland, MD, looking toward the Narrows

 

  • Grandson Earl Burkett (1892-1968) was born in April 1892 in Maryland. He wedded Pearl (1898- ? ). They made a home in 1930 in Eckhart Mines, Allegany County, with Earl's father sharing the residence. At that time, Earl worked as a coal mine motorman and the father as a coal miner. Evidence hints that Earl may have married a second time to Elizabeth Posthethwait (1909- ? ). The Burketts relocated to Canton, Stark County. Earl died there in 1968. Burial was in Forest Hill Cemetery in Canton.
  • Grandson William "Carl" Burkett (1894-1963) was born in May 1894 in Maryland. Carl was united in matrmiony with Ethel Long (1896-1968). Together, the pair bore these children -- William Clifton Burkett, Milton Burkett, Howard Burkett, Ruth Alexander, William "Vernon" Burkett and Shirley Jean Piccari. As with his brother Earl, Carl moved to Canton, Stark County, OH in 1949. Sadly, Carl died in Canton's Aultman Hospital, after a stay of a month, at the age of 68 on Feb. 12, 1963. His remains were shipped back to Cumberland, and an obituary stated that he was survived by 10 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. The funeral was preached by Rev. Marvin Simpson of the English Baptist Church. Ethel lived for another five years. She was swept away by the angel of death in 1968. They sleep for all time in Vale Summit Methodist Church Cemetery in Allegany County.

Great-grandson William Clifton Burkett (1914-1989) did not move to Akron with his parents and remained in Cumberland.

Great-grandson Milton Burkett (1915-1992) established a home in Akron, OH.

Great-grandson Howard Burkett (1918-1974) resided in Akron, OH.

Great-granddaughter Ruth Burkett (1920-2015) married Frank Alexander. They dwelled in Canton in 1963.

Great-grandson William "Vernon" Burkett (1931-1997) was born on Sept. 4, 1931 in Frostburg, MD. He was in Canton circa 1963.

Great-granddaughter Shirley Jean Burkett (1936-2018) wedded Raymond Piccari. Circa 1963, they lived in Canton.

  • Granddaughter Della M. Burkett (1905- ? ) was born on Sept. 22, 1905. She entered into marriage with (?) Scouler ( ? - ? ). The couple migrated to Michigan and resided for years in Detroit. Della died at the age of 92, in Royal Oak Township, Oakland County, MI on Dec. 20, 1997.

Daughter Rachel "Elizabeth" Burkett (1867-1968) was born on Sept. 21, 1867 in Eckhart, a coal mining town near Vale Summit and located between Frostburg and Claryville, Allegany County, MD. She was twice-wed. Her first spouse, whom she married in about 1887, was Perry Kennell (Aug. 13, 1868-1911), son of Levi and Catherine (Beal) Kennell. The couple were the parents of a dozen offspring -- William Kennell, Erdie V. Kennell, Lonie M. Kennell, Archie Calvin Kennell, Mina "Minnie" Kennell, Sidna Leora "Sindy" Troutman, Beulah A. Kennell and Melvin M. Kennell. Two other of the children were deceased by 1900. When the censuses of 1900-1910 were made, Perry is shown as making a living as a brickyard laborer. Sadly, Perry died on Nov. 20, 1911, with burial in Comp's Cemetery, but the details are not known. Shortly after, she entered into marriage with Charles Tipton (Aug. 27, 1867-1918), son of Joseph and Emiline (Kiser) Tipton of Fairhope. He worked as a laborer in a local brickyard. But burdened with tuberculosis, during the nationwide influenza epidemic of 1918, he was spirited away by death at the age of 50 on Jan. 14, 1918. His remains were lowered into the earth of Comp's Cemetery. Elizabeth spent the remaining half-century of her life as a widow and endured the deaths of seven of her offspring. Her final years were spent in the household of her daughter Minnie Kennell. She marked her 100th birthday in September 1967 and was pictured in the Cumberland Evening Times. She succumbed to death at the age of 100 on June 27, 1968. Interment was in Hillcrest Burial Park in Cumberland. The Cumberland News obituary said she was survived by 11 grandchildren, 34 great-grandchildren and 19 great-great grandchildren. Presiding at her funeral service was Rev. Louis Emerick of Trinity Methodist Church. The remains were lowered under the sod of Hillcrest Burial Park.

  • Grandson William Kennell (1886- ? ) was born in Sept. 1886.
  • Grandson Erdie V. Kennell (1888- ? ) was born on Nov. 1888.
  • Granddaughter Lonie/Louie M. Kennell (1891- ? ) was born in June 1891.
  • Grandson Archie Calvin Kennell (1897-1967) was born in Aug. 1897 in Fairhope, Somerset County. He appears to have been married twice. On May 7, 1934, in Hyndman, Bedford County, he was united in matrimony with his first bride, Margaret ( ? - ? ). That union is believed to have resulted in four children -- Lawrence Kennell, Leo Kennell, Josephine Vontella and Peggy Kimble. Archie was employed for many years as a freight conductor with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in Cumberland, MD. The marriage was toubled, and Margaret alleged that he had treated her with cruelty and had "cused and threatened her," reported the Cumberland News. Margaret was granted a "partial" divorce in Allegany County Circuit Court in May 1942, with her receiving custody of their two infant children, and Archie ordered to pay $75 per month in alimony. He also was issued a restraining order prohibiting him from entering her home at 319 Offutt Street. The case was covered in the News. In time he married again to Esta Liller ( ? - ? ). She too had been married previously and brought these children to the second union -- Russell Liller, Glenn Liller, Ernest Liller and Mary Poland. Archie is known to have survived a July 1957 B&O Railroad derailment involving 36 cars traveling at high speed. In reporting on the wreck, the Cumberland Sunday Times said that "The twin diesels hauling the westbound 'Time Saver' -- bound from New Jersey to Chicago -- were not derailed. The third car of the train left the tracks and pulled 35 other cars with it, blockign both of [the] main tracks... Cause of the wreck was not determined immediately but a railroad spokesman said extreme 90-degree heat of the past few days may have resulted in buckling of the steel track." The couple's residence in the mid-1960s was at 27 Front Street in Cumberland. Sadly, Archie died at home at the age of 70 on Dec. 28, 1967. The remains were interred in Hillcrest Burial Park following a funeral preached by Rev. Everett W. Culp of the First Methodist Church.

Great-grandson Lawrence Walter Kennell joined the U.S. Marine Corps in 2956. After his service ended, he put down roots in Frederick, MD.

Great-grandson Leo Kennell established a home in Rural Retreat, VA.

Great-granddaughter Josephine Kennell wedded (?) Vontella. She dwelled in 1967 in Jersey City, NJ.

Great-granddaughter Peggy Kennell married (?) Kimble. She migrated to Jersey City, NJ and was there in 1967.

  • Granddaughter Mina "Minnie" Kennell (1899- ? ) was born in Dec. 1899. She appears not to have married but spent most if not all of her adult life in Cumberland, MD. Cirvca 1962, she shared a home at 1205 Frederick Street in Cumberland with her sister Elizabeth Tipton. She accidentally injured Elizabeth in July 1961 while starting to move her automobile forward while the sister was still trying to get out. The sister was "thrown down on the shoulder of Pine Avenue and sustained contusions and lacerations," said the Cumberland News. Elizabeth filed a "friendly" personal injury lawsuit, and Minnie agreed to settle the matter for 500.

 

Early view of Wellersburg, PA

 

  • Granddaughter Sidna Leora "Sindy" Kennell (1903-1970) was born in about 1903 in Fairhope, Somerset County. She entered into wedded union with Claude Ora Troutman ( ? -1974), son of John and Mary (Smith) Troutman. Five known children born to this union were Robert F. Troutman, John W. Troutman, Edna Gross, Nancy L. Bisbing and Susan Troutman. The marriage was troubled, and the couple is believed to have separated circa 1931. But they appear to have patched things up, and the family home in 1940 was in Southampton Township, Somerset County, along Gladden Run Road, next-door to Sidna's bachelor uncle Charles Burkett. Charles earned a living at that time as a pipefitter for a silk mill. He belonged to the Kennell's Mill Sportsmen's Club. In time Sidna and Claude separated for good. After that, Sidna dwelled with her sisters at 1205 Frederick Street in Cumberland. At the end, Sidna was admitted to Western Maryland State Hospital in Hagerstown. She died there at the age of 67 on April 16, 1970. Rev. Kenneth L. Korns led the funeral service, with interment of the remains in Comp's Cemetery. An obituary in the Cumberland Evening Times said that her pallbearers included George Dennison, Ronald Emerick, Eugene Martz, Wilbert Michaels, Gerald Willison and John R. Willison. Former husband Claude spent his remaining years in Hyndman. He died at home at the age of 76 on Sept. 5, 1974.

Great-grandson Robert F. Troutman resided in Wellersburg, Somerset County in 1970 and near Cumberland in 1974.

Great-grandson John W. Troutman established a residence in LaVale near Cumberland as of 1970. By 1974, his address was Corriganville, MD.

Great-granddaughter  Edna Fay Troutman (1938- ? ) was born in about 1938. She was united in matrimony with (?) Gross. Her home in 1970 was Oldtown, MD and in 1974 in Flintstone, MD.

Great-granddaughter  Nancy Lee Troutman (1933- ? ) was born in about 1933. She was joined in wedlock with (?) Bisbing. She lived in Hyndman in 1970 and Cumberland in 1974.

Great-granddaughter Susan "Sue" Troutman was unmarried and dwelled in Cumberland circa 1970-1974.

  • Granddaughter Beulah A. Kennell (1906- ? ) was born in about 1906. She married Paul H. Shaffer (Jan. 19, 1910-1971). The couple did not reproduce. They lived in Wellersburg, and Paul commuted each day to Maryland to work for Cumberland Cement and Supply Company. On the fateful and dark day of Feb. 16, 1971, Paul took his own life at home at the age of 61 using a gun. In covering the matter, the Cumberland News said it was "apparently self-inflicted."

 

Grace (Clitz) Kennell's employer, Celanese Corp. in Cumberland

 

  • Grandson Melvin K. Kennell (1908-1976) was born on Oct. 3, 1908 in Fairhope, Somerset County. He wedded Grace M. Clitz ( ? - ? ). Together, they bore three children -- Billy K. Kennell, Leroy E. Kennell and Shirley Lee Martz. The family belonged to the Fairhope Community Church. At the age of 17, in about 1925, he became employed by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's Bolt and Forge Shop in Cumberland. He remained with the company for a remarkable 48 years as a blacksmith helper, retiring on Oct. 1, 1973. Grace also earned a living of her own for 37 years as an employee of the Celanese plant in Cumberland. Melvin made income on the side installing septic tanks and cesspools. They lived four miles south of Hyndman in a community known as Palo Alto, PA. Melvin made headlines in November 1945 when he accidentally shot his 15-year-old son Leroy while hunting rabbits. Reported the Cumberland News, "he did not see his son on the side of the hill when he shot at a rabbit." At Melvin's retirement, he and Grace were feted with a dinner at Corriganville Fire Hall, and they were pictured in the News, cutting a cake. Melvin died at the age of 68, on Oct. 8, 1976, as a resident of Lions Manor Nursing Home in Cumberland. An obituary in the News said he was survived by 14 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Rev. Leroy Logsdon led the funeral, with burial following in Comp's Cemetery.

Great-grandson Billy K. Kennell lived in Corriganville, MD in the mid-1970s.

Great-grandson Leroy E. Kennell was accidentally shot by his father when hunting rabbits together in 1945. Leroy received "shotgun wounds of the left eye, cheek and left shoulder," reported the Cumberland News. He made his home in 1976 in Cumberland.

Great-grandson Shirley Lee Kennell married (?) Martz. She dwelled in Meyersdale, PA in 1976.

Son John Adam Burkett (1870-1912) was born on Aug. 6, 1870 in Maryland. He was joined in the bonds of wedlock with Matilda McFarland (March 22, 1871-1957), daughter of John and Elizabeth (Loar) McFarland of Loartown, MD. They bore eight known children, all sons but one -- Harry Burkett, John W. Burkett, Roy L. Burkett, Adam Burkett, Russell Burkett, James E. Burkett, Robert Burkett and Annie Burkett. Federal census records for 1910 list the family in Allegany County, MD, with John Adam and their three eldest sons all working as coal miners. Sadly, John died at the age of 42 on Dec. 19, 1912. Details of his untimely demise are not known. His remains were lowered into the sacred soil of Eckhart Mines Cemetery. Matilda far outlived her husband, surviving for another 45 years as a widow. She was a longtime member of LaVale Baptist Church. At the end, she shared a home in LaVale with her son Roy. She passed into the arms of the angels on Dec. 8, 1957. Said an obituary in the Cumberland Evening Times, her survivors numbered 14 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren. Funeral services were led by her pastor, Rev. J.C. Lanning. Her pallbearers were Richard Burkett, David Burkett, John D. Burkett, William Burkett, Glenn Burkett and Paul Burkett. Burial was beside her husband, reunited in death after four-plus decades of separation.

  • Grandson Harry Burkett (1891- ? ) was born in about 1891 in Maryland. In 1957, he lived in Frostburg, MD.
  • Grandson John W. Burkett (1893- ? ) was born in about 1893 in Maryland. He resided in the mid-1950s in LaVale, MD.
  • Grandson Roy L. Burkett (1895-1980) was born in about 1895. He made his home in 1957 in LaVale, near Cumberland.
  • Grandson Adam Burkett (1898- ? ) was born in about 1898 in Maryland. In the mid-1950s, his residence was in LaVale, MD.
  • Granddaughter Annie Burkett (1900- ? ) was born in about 1900 in Maryland. She was joined in matrimony with John Radcliff ( ? - ? ). The Radcliffs were in LaVale, MD in 1957.
  • Grandson Russell Burkett (1903- ? ) was born in about 1903 in Maryland. Circa 1957, his home was in Frostburg, MD.
  • Grandson James E. Burkett (1905- ? ) was born in about 1905 in Maryland.
  • Grandson Robert Burkett (11910- ? ) was born in about 1910 in Maryland.

Son Charles Edward Burkett (1874-1957) was born on Sept. 3 or 13, 1874 in Maryland. He came to Somerset County with his parents in the late 1870s or early '80s. He never married. In 1910, at the age of 35, he resided at home with his parents near Hyndman in Southampton Township, Somerset County, and helped his father with farm labor. He was present at the death of his father in 1911. In April 1914, with a post office address of Ellerslie, MD, Charles wrote to the U.S. Pension Commissioner in Washington, DC, stating that "i stayed at home all my life and help my father and mother along. now my father is dead. But my mother is living yet and she gets 12.00 a month pension. now i will tell you that i have only one hand and i Cant make a living and i wood lik to know if i Can get a pension to help me along." He lived to the age of 82, continuing his occupation of farming, with death occurring from a heart attack on June 12, 1957. Elizabeth Tipton of Cumberland, MD signed the official death certificate. The coroner wrote that "Above deceased found about 24 hours after death, both has skin slip." Burial was with his parents in Comp's Cemetery.

 

~ Son Josiah "Joseph" Emerick ~

 

Indiana's marker, Comp's Cemetery

Son Josiah "Joseph" Emerick (1835-1894) was born on Dec. 6, 1835 in Southampton Township.

He married Indiana Davis (1842-1894), who may have been born in Indiana but more likely in Pennsylvania and whose father was an immigrant from England. Census records show that Indiana could not write.

The 10 known children the couple produced together were John A. Emerick, St. Louis Emerick, Charles E. Emerick, Richard C. Emerick, Ida Emerick, Clara May Emerick, Joseph Emerick, James "Perry" Emerick, Mary Ellen Shumaker and Noah C. Emrick. Son John may alternately have gone by the name "Alexander," and one son also went by the name "George."

During the Civil War, in about 1862 or '63, after the births of their two eldest sons, the family moved across the state line in to Maryland and settled on a farm near Cumberland in Allegany County, MD.

They remained there until about 1879 or '80 and then relocated back into Pennsylvania to Fairhope their old home region of Southampton Township. In 1880, the census shows all of the boys who were above the age of 12 working on the farm.

Josiah and Indiana died within a few months of each other. He passed first, on March 15, 1894.

She survived until May, and died on May 29, 1894. They rest for eternity in Comp's Cemetery. Her grave marker remains legible today. [Find-a-Grave] In 1934, the location of their graves was surveyed and recorded by the Works Progress Administration [link]. In 2016, Indiana's marker was photographed by the founder of this website.

Son John A. Emerick (1859- ? ) was born in about 1859 in Southampton Township. Nothing more about his life is known.

Son St. Louis Emerick (1860-1934) was born on Oct. 9, 1860 in Southampton Township. He was a longtime self-employed farmer. His bride was Anna Willison ( ? - ? ). In the early 1930s, they dwelled at 333 Strayer Street in Dale, Cambria County, PA. St. Louis suffered from chronic heart disease and, when contracting pneumonia in the spring of 1934, his health declined quickly. He died at age 73 years, six months on April 10, 1934. His remains were returned to Southampton Township for interment in Comp's Cemetery. Mrs. Mae Miller of 127 Joseph Avenue signed the official Pennsylvania certificate of death

Son Charles E. Emrick (1863- ? ) was born in about 1863 near Cumberland, Allegany County, MD. He married Elizabeth A. Walsh (1868- ? ). They are interred together in Frostburg Memorial Park in Frostburg, Allegany County, MD. [Find-a-Grave]

Son Richard C. Emrick (1866-1949) was born in 1866 near Cumberland, Allegany County, MD. He married Martha M. Kennell (1867-1944), daughter of Andrew Kennell. They resided in Hyndman, PA and had eight children -- Joanna Emerick, Mrs. O.E. Mull, Shannon Burkett, Mrs. Walter Schuida, George Emerick, Edward Emerick, Cletis Emerick and Leo Emerick. They were members of the Gladdens Reformed Church. Sadly, Martha passed away on March 22, 1944 at the age of 77. The Cumberland Evening Times printed an obituary. Richard died at the age of 82 on March 26, 1949. Burial was in Comp's Cemetery, with Rev. Charles Evans officiating at the funeral, and an obituary appearing in the Cumberland (MD) Sunday Times. In 1944, daughter Joanna lived in Philadelphia; Mrs. Mull in Seward, PA; Shannon in Hyndman; Mrs. Schiuda in Philadelphia, son George in Cumberland, Edward in Burgettstown, Cletis in Joliet, IL and Leo in Hyndman.

 

Comp's Church Cemetery

 

Daughter Ida Emerick (1869- ? ) was born in December 1869 near Cumberland, Allegany County, MD. She may have passed away during the decade of the 1870s, but this needs to be confirmed.

Daughter Clara May Emerick (1871- ? ) was born in about 1871 near Cumberland, Allegany County, MD.

Son Joseph Emrick (1873-1949) born in about 1872 or 1873 near Cumberland, Allegany County, MD. He miegrated to Indiana and was wedded to Dollie Jeannette Cain (1877-1962). Joseph passed away in 1949. Burial was in Lake View Cemetery in Kendallville, Noble County, IN. [Find-a-Grave] Dollie joined him in eternal repose in 1962.

Son James "Perry" Emrick (1875-1952) was born on July 10, 1875 near Cumberland, Allegany County, MD. He was twice married. His first bride was Margaret "Maggie" Milks (1878-1958). The couple produced one son, Charles P. Emrick, and later divorced. Perry's second spouse, whom he married in or before 1918, was Josephine Toellner (1875-1956). Their two sons were Toellner Emrick and Perry J. Emrick. Perry passed away in Helmer, Steuben County, IN on June 15, 1952. Josephine outlived him by four years and passed away on Oct. 11, 1956. They rest together under a red barre granite stone in Lake View Cemetery in Kendalville, Noble County, IN. [Find-a-Grave] Former wife Maggie married again to Guy F. Failor and died in Indiana on Oct. 28, 1958.

Daughter Mary Ellen Emerick (1878-1938) was born on Nov. 16, 1878 near Cumberland, Allegany County, MD. She was united in holy wedlock with Samuel J. Shumaker ( ? - ? ). They made their home in the late 1930s in the rural outskirts of Mount Pleasant, Westmoreland County, PA. When she was about age 37, in 1915, she began to develop a goiter. She also began to endure congestive heart failure and kidney disease. She was unable to continue with housework in about June 1937 as her health failed. She died on June 24, 1938, at home. Her remains were placed into eternal repose in Mount Pleasant Cemetery.

Son George W. Emerick (1881-1959) was born in 1881. He migrated to Indiana and at one time lived near Helmer, Steuben County, IN. He married Mary E. (1882-1939). They produced at least one son, Ralph Lowell Emrick, born in 1917. Mary died in 1939 at the age of 57. George lived on for another two decades. He expired in 1959. Burial is in Wright Cemetery in Hudson, Steuben County. [Find-a-Grave]

Son Noah C. Emrick (1887-1973) was born in 1887, the youngest of 10 children and 28 years younger than his eldest sibling. He was united in holy wedlock with Lulu E. (1890-1970). Noah died in 1970 and Lulu in 1973. They are buried together in Fairfield Cemetery in Fairfield Center, DeKalb County, IN. [Find-a-Grave]

 

~ Son Jonathan Emerick Jr. ~

Son Jonathan Emerick Jr. (1837-1923) was born on June 18, 1837. He was a lifelong farmer in Southampton Township.

He is believed to have married Drusilla (1842-1907).

In 1860, this young couple boarded in the home of Jonathan's parents in Southampton. He is thought to be the same "Jont. Emerick" who in 1872 successfully sued Roddy & Findley and won $3,578.38 in damages, an item reported by the Somerset Herald.

Circa 1877, he is believed to have owned a tract of 308 acres with rich underlying deposits of coal, iron ore, limestone, fire clay, petroleum and other mineral resources. Circa 1879, Jonathan and his brothers, Gaumer cousins and others helped erect a new house of worship for the community, known as Comp's Lutheran and Reformed Church.

Then in 1911, when his widowed sister Tena was attempting to obtain her late husband's Civil War pension, Jonathan provided an affidavit on her behalf.

On June 18, 1907, Drusilla died at age 66 at home at Cook's Mills, Bedford County, PA. Reported the Cumberland (MD) Evening Times, the funeral was held at the Cook's Mills Church with interment in the church graveyard.

Jonathan was named in the 1913 Meyersdale Republican obituary of his brother Nathan as living in Gladdens.

At the age of 86, he was swept away by the Grim Reaper on Dec. 10, 1923. No physician was in attendance, and no cause of death was officially reported. Allen Bittner of Ellerslie, MD was the informant for the Pennsylvania certificate of death. Burial was in Cook's Mill, PA.

 

Solomon's grave, Comp Church

~ Son Solomon Emerick ~

Son Solomon Emerick (1840-1921) was born on Feb. 11, 1840 in Southampton Township.

Evidence strongly suggests that he married Mary Ellen "Ella" Albright (1842- ? ).

Their nine known children were Ida Lepley, James F. Emrick, Charles Edward Emerick, Jonathan Theodore "John" Emerick, Amanda Emerick, Rebecca Devore Shroyer, Hannah R. Emerick, George H. Emerick and Effa "Effie" (Emerick) Emerick.

In 1870, when the census count was made, the Emricks dwelled on a farm in Southampton Township as next door neighbors to Solomon's mother. They may have resided circa 1872 onward near Hyndman, Bedford County, PA.

Circa 1879, Solomon and his brothers, Gaumer cousins and others helped erect a new house of worship for the community, known as Comp's Lutheran and Reformed Church.

When the federal census was taken in 1880, the large family resided on a farm in Southampton Township, next door to farmers Daniel and Hannah Gaumer.

In April 1893, he was named in the Somerset Herald as a petit juror for the quarter sessions court, from Southampton Township. Solomon and six other Emericks -- Jacob, William, John L., Valentine, Nathan and John J. -- were listed in a May 1896 issue of the Herald for property owners whose "unseated lands" were to be sold for failure to pay taxes.

Solomon made news in October 1907 in the Pine Grove (PA) Press Herald involving a fight between barn animals. "Speaking of little courage and big cowardice," said the Press Herald, "Solomon Emeick, of Southampton township, has a small game rooster, which attacked a large red bull in a field and routed him. The bovine bellower could not withstand the vicious stabs from the cock's spurs." He was named in the 1913 Meyersdale Republican obituary of his brother Nathan as living in Gladdens.

He also enjoyed traveling from his home in Gladdens to pay visits with family in friends. Gossip columns in local newspapers reported trips he had made over the years in Pennsylvania to Dry Ridge, Meyersdale and Somerset and in Maryland to Cumberland, Midland and Vale Summit. At one sojourn, in February 1909, the Republican said he had gone to Meyersdale "where he intends visiting for a few days. It is his  purpose on returning with him some lady friend who shall hereafter take charge of his house and cuisine. We wish him success on his little journey of conquest."

Politically, Solomon was known for supporting the Democrat party but for keeping an open mind. The Republican in Meyersdale said in June 1910 that he was "one of the Republican's esteemed readers in Southampton township [who] spent several days in the city this week and was a welcome caller at The Republican sanctum. Mr. Emerick belongs to the rock-ribbed Democracy, but he is broad enough to subscribe for a Republican paper that prints about all the news that's worth printing. The Southampton Emericks are of Revolution ancestry and the spirit of '76 still animates them."

The Bedford Gazette published a travel column circa 1918 known as "Snyder's Travelette." The author wrote in April 1918 that during the Easter holiday, while traveling, "Coming up the road I met Solomon Emerick an old war horse Democrat from Somerset county. The Emericks are Democrats who stick and all good fellows."

Suffering from an insufficient flow of blood to his heart, Solomon died at age 81 on May 11 or 14, 1921, with burial in Comp's Cemetery. Son George, residing in Ellerslie, MD, signed the death certificate and then with his brother Jonathan were named as the executors of his estate.

Daughter Ida Elizabeth Emerick (1864-1941) was born on March 19, 1864 in Gladdens, Somerset County. She was united in marriage with a Gaumer cousin, Samuel Lepley (Jan. 28, 1861-1947) of Southampton Township and son of Adam and Sarah (Comp) Lepley. See the Lepley biography for more.

Son James Emrick (1867- ? ) was born in about 1867. His fate has not yet been discovered.

Son Charles Edward Emerick (1868-1925) was born on Oct. 2, 1868. He was married and a longtime railroad laborer, living in Hyndman, Bedford County. Just 19 days before his 57th birthday, in 1925, he placed a gun against his head and pulled the trigger, dying instantly. The suicide took place in Hyndman, Bedford County, PA on Sept. 13, 1925. His wife signed the death certificate. Burial was in Cooks Mills, PA.

Son Jonathan Theodore "John" Emerick (1872-1947) was born on Feb. 11, 1872 in Hyndman, Bedford County. He married Jennie Bittner (1872-1954), daughter of Nelson and Harriet (Boyer) Bittner of Glencoe, PA. They dwelled in rural Hyndman for decades, where John labored as a farmer. Suffering from cancer of his left foot, John died at the age of 75 on Oct. 31, 1947. He was interred in Palo Alto Cemetery in Bedford County. Jennie lived for another seven years after her husband's death. She endured chronic heart ailments, having been diagnosed in January 1940, and died at age 81 on April 24, 1954. E.T. Martz of Hyndman signed the death certificate.

Daughter Amanda E. "Manda" Emerick (1875- ? ) was born in about 1875 in Southampton Township.

Daughter Rebecca Emerick (1876-1918) was born on June 25, 1876. She was twice-wed. In about 1898, when she was 22, she was joined in wedlock with farmer Michael Devore (April 1874- ? ). Together, the pair bore two known children -- Bessie J. Devore and Mary E. Emerick. When the federal census enumeration was made in 1900, the Devores lived next door to Rebecca's aged uncle and aunt, Jacob and Delilah "Lilah" Emerick in Southampton Township. A 1902 article in the Meyersdale Republican said that Michael's farm had been rented by George Emerick and that Michael was thinking about "taking a western trip" in April and would "sell his personal property..." His home in 1905 was in Williams Station. Rebecca sued for divorce in March 1906, citing "cruel treatment," said the Republican. Attorney John O. Kimmel, at age 92, acted as master in the case and recommended that the court grant her request. Said the Republican, "We have our doubts whether there is another attorney in this state who is still actively engaged in his profession as Mr. Kimmell's age." By 1910, she again was united in matrimony with 19-year-old coal miner Solomon Shroyer (1884- ? ). The bride was five years older than the groom. The family made a home in Londonderry, Bedford County, in 1910 and later moved to the Comp's Church area of Fairhope, Somerset County. At the age of 42, in the fall of 1918, Rebecca contracted a serious case of bronchial pneumonia and influenza. Her 19-year-old Mary daughter Mary also came down with the same illness. Four days later, both women were dead, the end coming within two hours of each other on Oct. 22, 1918. Their bodies were interred the same day in Comp Church Cemetery. Said the Republican, "She leaves a husband and six small children; also one daughter-in-law, Mrs. Walter Shroyer, living at home.... She will be greatly missed by all. She was a true and faithful mother."

 

Comp's Church Cemetery, where Rebecca (Emerick) Devore Shroyer and her daughter Mary (Devore) Emerick were buried the very same day in 1918, and where Rebecca's sister Effie Emerick was longtime caretaker.

 

  • Granddaughter Bessie J. Devore (1897- ? ) was born in Feb. 1897.
  • Granddaughter Mary E. Devore (1899-1918) was born in March 1899. She entered into marriage with a cousin, Earl Emerick ( ? - ? ). In the fall of 1918, both she and her mother were diagnosed with bronchial pneumonia and influenza. After suffering for four days, Mary succumbed to her illness on Oct. 22, 1918. Within two hours, the mother followed her into eternal life. Mary was only 19 years, seven months and 22 days in age. Said the Meyersdale Republican, "She leaves a husband and one small child 2 months old, her father Michael Devore of Boswell, and other relatives and friends." Burial of both sets of remains was in Comp's Cemetery.
  • Grandson Carl Shroyer (1907- ? ) was born in 1907, possibly a twin with his sister Madeline.
  • Granddaughter Madeline Shroyer (1907- ? ) was born in 1907, possibly a twin with her brother Carl.

Daughter Hannah R. Emerick (1877- ? ) was born in about 1877 in Southampton Township.

Son George H. Emerick (1880-1947) was born on Jan. 16, 1880 in Gladdens, Southampton Township. On April 24, 1901, George entered into marriage with Mary Ellen Wilhelm ( ? - ? ). Their union endured for 46 years. The couple's brood of three sons included Russell E. Emerick, Merrill G. "Mearl" Emerick and John M. Emerick. Their home in 1918-1941 was near Hyndman, Bedford County, and they worshipped at the Hyndman Reformed Church. George worked as a longtime farmer and for a decade as a road supervisor in Londonderry Township, Bedford County, retiring in 1943. He also ran a service station at Palo Alto, located a distance of four miles south of Hyndman. Sadly, at the age of 67, George died in Allegany Hospital in Cumberland on Nov. 24, 1947. The Cumberland News published his obituary, which noted that the funeral was held in the Palo Alto Evangelical Church, led by Rev. W.L. Lloyd of Ellerslie, MD. Burial of the remains was in Palo Alto Cemetery.

  • Grandson Russell E. Emerick lived in Palo Alto, Bedford County in 1947 and rural Hyndman in 1975.
  • Grandson Merrill G. "Mearl" Emerick (1908-1975) was born on April 21, 1908 in Hyndman, Bedford County. Merrill was joined in wedlock with Virginia Kennell ( ? - ? ). Four children were produced in this marriage -- Kenneth M. Emerick, Ray C. Emerick, Wayne C. Emerick and Joan M. Lowery. He made his home in Palo Alto, Bedford County and was employed for the Amcelle plant of Celanese Fibers Company in Cumberland. He belonged to the Eagles aerie in Cumberland and the Oscar Jordan Post of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, named after a cousin who had been killed in World War II. Toward the end, he was admitted to Cumberland's Sacred Heart Hospital and died there at the age of 67 on Sept. 29, 1975. A Meyersdale Republican obituary said he was survived by 18 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.

Great-grandson Kenneth M. Emerick made his residence in rural Hyndman in 1975.

Great-grandson Ray C. Emerick lived in rural Hyndman.

Great-grandson Wayne C. Emerick moved to Wiley Ford, WV.

Great-granddaughter Joan M. Emerick wedded (?) Lowery. She was in rural Hyndman in 1975.

  • Grandson John M. Emerick relocated to Cumberland, MD and was there circa 1975.

Daughter Effa "Effie" Emerick (1885-1984) was born on Feb. 18, 1885 in Kennells Mill, Somerset County. At the age of about 17 or 18, circa 1903, she wedded a cousin, Christopher "Christ" Emerick (Sept. 15, 1879-1966), son of Valentine and Catherine (Smith) Emerick of the Comp's section of Southampton Township. They were the parents of sons Clifton C. Emerick and Robert L. Emerick. The couple also adopted a son, Roy Boyer. The federal censuses of 1910-1940 show the family dwelling on a farm in Southampton Township, Somerset County. In February 1928, for her 43rd birthday, she was thrown a surprise party by her son and his wife, with the news reported in the gossip columns of the Meyersdale Republican. Circa 1930, their adopted son, cousin Henry Emerick and Christ's brother Albert Emerick lived under their roof. Cousin Henry remained with them at least through 1940. For decades, Effie served as caretaker for the Comp's Church. Sadly, Christ died in Sacred Heart Hospital in Cumberland, MD at the age of 87 on Oct. 25, 1966. His remains were laid to rest in Comp's Cemetery, following services in the adjacent cemetery led by Rev. John Klindt. Effie survived as a widow for another 18 years. She and her father in law were pictured in a lengthy feature story about the church, published in the June 27, 1968 edition of the Republican. Of the church, the article recounted that Effie's father, uncles and Gaumer cousins had helped erect the building in 1879 as a joint venture between the Evangelical Lutheran and German Reformed congregations, and that it was dedicated the following year.

The two congregations worshipped there until about 1905 when regular services were abandoned. Since then for many years it served only as a chapel for funerals. Lighting struck the church at Comps, shattering its tower. It was repaired and rededicated by pastor F.e. Lauffer, Sept. 17, 1911. During 1937 the building was repaired to the extent of several hundred dollars and was rededicated by Rev.s. A.S. kresge and B.A. Black. Withing recent years, however, the building has undergone complete renovation, inside and out, and serevices are again conducted regularly. Currently Rev. Norman E. Seese of Somerset holds service there every other Sunday.

At the age of 83, the Republican reported, she was still overseeing the operation of her farm. She also was known for rmaking rugs from bread wrappers. At her 85th birthday, in 1970, she received gifts including a color television set, many birthday cards and a puppet show performed by Nancy and Kathy Emerick. She again was feted with a surprise 88th birthday party in 1973, where not one but two birthday cakes were served for family and friends. The angel of death swept Effie away at the age of 99 on June 10, 1984, while in the Maple Mountain Manor Nursing Home in Berlin, Somerset County. Burial was in Comp's Cemetery, with Rev. Kenneth L. Korns presiding.

  • Grandson Clifton C. Emerick (1903-1993) was born on July 19, 1903 near Hyndman, Bedford County. He spent his life in the community and devoted his years to farming. He was joined in matrimony with Loretta E. Campbell ( ? -1990). The offspring produced by this union included Clyde C. Emerick and Elsie L. Leydig. They attended the Calvary Bible church in nearby Ellerslie, MD, and he held a membership in the Eagles aerie in Cumberland. Sadly, Loretta passed away on July 18, 1990. Clifton outlived her by three years. Toward the end he was admitted to Sacred Heart Hospital in Cumberland, where he died at the age of 89 on June 14, 1993.
  • Grandson Robert L. Emerick (1906-1920) was born in 1906. He died in 1920, at the age of about 14.
  • Adopted grandson Roy Boyer (1914- ? ) was born in about 1914. At the age of 16, in 1930, he resided with his adoptive parents in Southampton.

 

John's grave, Comp Church

~ Son John J. Emrick ~

Son John J. Emrick (1841-1899) was born on Aug. 10, 1841 in Southampton Township, Somerset County. He appears to have used the variant spellings "Emerick" and "Emrick" during his lifetime.

During the Civil War, although he would have been of prime age, John is not known to have taken up arms in the army.

John was united in the bonds of holy matrimony with Elizabeth Albright (Sept. 24, 1850-1920), a native of nearby Sand Patch, Somerset County and the daughter of John and Elizabeth (Keefer) Albright. The bride was nine years younger than the groom.

Together, the couple produced a family of 11 known offspring -- Emanuel Emerick, Susanna "Susan" Kennel, Jane Rachel Tharp, Edward Emerick, Albert James Emerick, Irvin Benjamin Emerick, William H. Emerick, Lewis S. Emerick, Bertha M. Bloom, Jesse Emerick and John W. Emerick. Did Jesse also go by the name "Jefferson?"

In 1870, federal census enumeration records show that the family lived on a farm in Southampton Township next door to John's mother and brothers. That year, 25-year-old Mary Emrick lived under their roof and earned her keep as a house keeper, as did 15-year-old farm worker William Albright.

Circa 1879, John and his brothers, Gaumer cousins and others helped erect a new house of worship for the community, known as Comp's Lutheran and Reformed Church.

When the census was taken in 1880, the family remained on a farm in Southampton, living next to John's married brothers Solomon and Lafayette.

 

Elizabeth's grave, Comp Church

Sadness blanketed the family when their son John died in 1896 at the age of only about one. The cause behind his untimely death is not yet known.

At the age of 57, John succumbed to the angel of death on April 11, 1899. His remains were lowered into the sacred soil of Comp's Cemetery among those of many of his extended family and community of neighbors.

A marker was erected at John's grave. It featured a design motif showing a dove flying above opened gates, with stars in the upper right- and left-hand corners. The symbolism of the gate is believed to be a passage to eternal life in Heaven. The dove signifies the soul's resurrection as it soars skyward.

Elizabeth lived as a widow for another 21 years in Southampton. She made her home in 1910 with her bachelor son Irvin and married son William and family, and with her bachelor brother Emanuel Albright.

She was diagnosed with stomach cancer in about 1916 and endured the illness for the last four years of her life.

She succumbed at the age of 69 on Jan. 10 or 20, 1920. Her son Irvin signed the death certificate. Burial was in the Comp Church Cemetery. The epitaph at the base of her grave marker, still legible today, reads: "Rest, Mother, rest in quiet sleep while friends in sorrow o’er thee weep."

 

Emanuel T.'s grave, Comp Church

Son Emanuel T. Emerick (1866-1881) was born in about 1866 in or near Wellersburg, Somerset County. At the age of 14, in 1880, he is believed to have dwelled with the family of W.J. and Ellen Myers in Northampton Township, Somerset County, and earned his wages as a servant. Tragically, however, he did not live to reach adulthood. He was cut away by the Grim Reaper of death, at the age of 15, on Dec. 15, 1881. Burial was in Comp's Cemetery at Comp's Crossroads in Somerset County. His grave marker was photographed by the founder of this website in about 2015. At that time, the lettering of his name was still visible, but the epitaph at the base was not legible.

Daughter Susanna "Susan" Emerick (1868-1935) was born on Aug. 16, 1868. Her birth year also has been given as 1865. In about 1891, when she was about age 22, she married 31-year-old Franklin Perry "Frank" Kennell (Aug. 21, 1859-1942), son of Andrew and Ellen Kennell. Their offspring of 11 children included Hobart James Kennell, Irvin Endrew Kennell, Bertha Grace Weimer, Florence E. Sturtz, Lulu Kennell, Jesse Kennell, Naomi Marie Emerick, Cora Ann Boyer and Edna Kennell, plus two who died young, prior to 1900. The family's dwelling-place was on a farm in Southampton Township in 1900-1930, considered the community of Gladdens. Frank was known for his prowess in boiling maple sugar, and in March 1917 the Meyersdale Republican reported that he had already produced 12 gallons of syrup. In 1923, Frank's name again was in print in the Republican when "hauling mining props to the Rowe Bros. mines near Wellersburg." He was badly hurt in January 1925 while working "dragging out props," said the Republican. The "horse he was riding fell in crossing a ditch and Mr. Kennell was caught underneath the animal and severely injured. W.K. Kennell, of Wellersburg, who authorized the work, was notified and with his car took took the injured man to his home, where he is recovering slowly under a doctor's care." Circa 1930, their seven-year-old granddaughter Idella Weimer lived in their household. The family received their mail in the 1930s through the post office at nearby Hyndman, Bedford County. Sadly, Susan contracted diabetes and endured the illness for the final three years of her life. She underwent surgery in 1933 with amputation of her right leg. Then just a few weeks before her 70th birthday, she suffered a cerebral hemorrhage and died at home on July 25, 1935. An obituary was printed in the Republican. Frank outlived his bride by seven years. Census records for 1940 show him retired and continuing to reside in Southampton, sharing a home with his widowed son Jesse. During that time, he endured both chronic hardening of the arteries and heart disease. At the age of 82, the angel of death swept him away on April 21, 1942. The Somerset Daily American published an obituary. The couple sleep for all time in Comp's Cemetery.

  • Grandson Hobart James Kennell (1896-1975) was born in Aug. 1896. A bachelor at the age of 23, in 1920, he lived at home and earned a living as a mine laborer. He resided in Welleersburg in 1935.
  • Grandson Irvin Endrew Kennell (1899-1966) was born in Aug. 1899. In 1920, when he was single and 21 years old, he was employed in a local coal mine. In 1935, he made a residence in Kennells Mill, PA.
  • Granddaughter Bertha Grace Kennell (1900-1960) was born in 1900. She married (?) Weimer ( ? - ? ). They bore a daughter, Idella Weimer. The Weimers were in Kennells Mill, PA in 1935 and in Hyndman, Bedford County in 1942.
  • Granddaughter Florence E. Kennell (1902-1988) was born in 1902. She married (?) Sturtz ( ? - ? ). She was in Wellersburg in 1935.
  • Granddaughter Lulu Kennell (1904-1939) was born in 1904.
  • Granddaughter Naomi Marie Kennell (1907-1996) was born in 1907. She was united in matrimony with (?) Emerick ( ? - ? ). They resided in Glencoe, PA in the mid-1930s-1942.
  • Grandson Jesse Kennell (1909-1991) was born in about 1909 in Southampton Township, although he claimed that his birth year was 1907. He was married and widowed by 1940. Circa 1935-1940, he and his widowed father shared a home in Southampton Township, with Jesse laboring there as a farmer.
  • Granddaughter Cora Ann Kennell (1910-1985) was born in 1910. She entered into marital union with (?) Boyer ( ? - ? ). She made her home with her parents near Wellersburg in 1935.
  • Granddaughter Edna Kennell (1913-2002) was born in about 1913 in Southampton Township. She was joined in the bonds of wedlock with Raymond Deneen ( ? - ? ). In 1935, they lived in Huskin, PA, where he was working at the time. By 1942, they had relocated to Hooversville, Somerset County. She died in 2002.

 

Bird's eye view of Hyndman, PA

 

Daughter Jane Rachel Emerick (1869-1954) was born on Jan. 15, 1869 at Comp's, Southampton Township, Somerset County. She wedded William L. Tharp (March 7, 1867-1919), son of Solomon and Delila (Beals) Tharp. The couple's family of offspring included Gertrude May Jordan, Edna Ruth Troutman, Roy William Tharp, Harry Tharp, Emma Elizabeth Leckemby, Edward Clair Tharp and Robert Tharp. William earned a living as a railroad laborer. Tragically, he received an injury in about 1917 which impacted him for the final two years of his life. He began to suffer from epileptic seizures. The convulsions continued and on the fateful day of July 4, 1919, the 49-year-old died from their effects while in Hyndman, Bedford County. She outlived her husband by decades and remained in Hyndman. During World War II, she mourned the loss of her son Robert Tharp and grandson Oscar Robert Jordan who were killed in the European Theatre. She was considered a Gold Star Mother and was honored at times over the years, including at banquets and also with her photograph appearing in the Bedford Gazette. She died at home at the age of 85 on Dec. 17, 1954 after suffering a massive heart attack. Interment of the remains was in Comp's Cemetery, with funeral services co-officiated by Rev. L.L. Wright and Rev. Louis Emerick. The Cumberland (MD) Sunday Times printed an obituary, which said she was survived by 15 grandchildren, 22 great-grandchildren and her sister Bertha Bloom of Corriganville.

  • Granddaughter Gertrude May Tharp (1890-1961) was born in April 1890 in Hyndman, Bedford County. In about 1909, she wedded Oscar George Jordan (Jan. 17, 1885-1961), also of Hyndman and the son of Andrew Michael and Laura Jeanette (Valentine) Jordan. News of their marriage license was printed in the Cumberland (MD) Evening Times. The couple were the parents of William Andrew Jordan, George Edward Jordan, Harry Jordan, Oscar Robert Jordan, Margaret Jordan, Helen Phillips and James Jordan. The family made their home in Hyndman. They lost their sons George (1918) and Harry (1920) and an unnamed son (1919) in infancy. During World War II, the family was plummeted into deep grieving not once but twice. In July 1944, Gertrude's brother Robert was killed in fighting in France. Then just five months later, in December 1944, during the Battle of the Bulge, their son Oscar was killed in fighting in Belgium. Gertrude lived on for another 17 years as a Gold Star Mother. She belonged to the Hyndman Evangelical United Brethren Church and its auxiliary of volunteers. Both wife and husband died in the same year. He passed first, on April 30, 1961. About three-and-a-half months later, she too succumbed in Ellerslie at the age of 71 on Aug. 11, 1961.

Great-grandson William Andrew Jordan (1911-1960)

 

Oscar R. Jordan
Courtesy Edward W. Evans

Great-grandson Oscar Robert Jordan (1922-1944) was born on Oct. 2, 1922 in Hyndman. He starred in sports at Hyndman High School. During World War II, he joined the U.S. Army on Jan. 19, 1943. He trained at Fort Sill, OK and was deployed to the European Theatre with the 285th Field Artillery, Company B, holding the rank of sergeant. The last letter he wrote home was dated just two days prior to his death. While in Belgium on Dec. 17, 1944, a day after a German counter-offensive had begun during the Battle of the Bulge, Oscar and the 285th were "on the move from Aachen, Germany, to Luxembourg," reported the Cumberland (MD) News. "Battery B was trapped and disarmed by German SS troops at Mamledy, near St. Vith. All of the captured men ... were lined up in an open field and then machine-gunned without warning. Several of the men managed to escape ... after the Nazi tanks moved off." Their bodies were left out in the elements, and some days or weeks later discovered by Allied forces. His corpse, lying face up in the snow, was identified by a GI Harry Horn who had known of him back home. He was pictured in an obituary in the Cumberland (MD) Evening Times. In May 1946, the Veterans of Foreign Wars post in Hyndman was formed and named in his memory. His remains were shipped to Hyndman in December 1947 for burial, accompanied by T-4 John E. Sargent. Services were held in the Hyndman Evangelical Church, officiated by Rev. C.E. Miller. Pallbearers were Roy Clites, William Cook, Sheldon Lewis, Albert Lynch, Reginald Mason and William Ritchey. The flag which had covered the casked was presented to his mother.

Great-grandmother Margaret Jordan was unmarried and lived with her widowed mother in Ellerslie in 1961.

Great-granddaughter Helen Jordan married Keith Phillips. They lived in Ellerslie, MD. In December 1947, as a World War II veteran, he took part in the funeral service of his wife's brother Oscar who had been gunned down as a prisoner of war during the Battle of the Bulge. The Phillipses resided in 1961 in Ellerslie.

Great-grandson James Jordan (1928-2005) dwelled in Hyndman.

  • Granddaughter Edna Ruth Tharp (1894-1971) was born on June 2, 1894 in Somerset County. She married Clement Isaac "Clem" Troutman (1894-1965). The couple's two children were Dolly Bishop and Edward Troutman. At the end, she was admitted to the Schroyer Rest Home in New Paris, PA. At age of about 76, she passed away there in 1971. Funeral services were led by Rev. Leroy Logsdon. Her remains are in eternal sleep in Palo Alto Hilltp Cemetery in Hyndman.

Great-granddaughter Dolly Troutman married (?) Bishop. Her home in 1971 was in Arlington, VA.

Great-grandson Edward Troutman ( ? - ? ) was born in (?). At the death of his mother in 1971, his whereabouts were unknown.

  • Grandson Roy William Tharp (1897-1951) was born on Feb. 11, 1897 in Hyndman, Bedford County. He joined the employ of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and became an engineer. Their longtime home was in Cumberland, Allegany County, MD, at the address of 225 Race Street. On Sept. 21, 1922, at the age of 25, Roy married Elva A. Mason (1900-1984). Together, the pair bore an only son, Donald Tharp. Sadly, he died at Memorial Hospital in Cumberland just two days before Christmas 1951. The body was laid into forever repose in Hillcrest Burial Park in Cumberland, with Rev. Leonard Wright officiated at the funeral service held in the home of Roy's mother and then at Grace Methodist Church in Cumberland, led by Rev. Allen Fisher. Elva outlived her husband by more than three decades. She died in 1984.

Great-grandson Donald Tharp was a student at Frostburg State Teachers College in 1951.

  • Grandson Harry Tharp (1898-1981) was born on Aug. 25, 1898 in Hyndman, Bedford County. He was united in matrimony wih Ardelia Divelbiss (Sept. 28, 1903-1999). Four daughters were born into this marriage -- Mildred Smith, Helen Turner, Eleanor Waugerman and Shirley Robertson. Harry earned a living as an engineer with the Chessie System railroad. He belonged to the Hyndman lodge of the Masons, the Harrisburg Consistory and the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers union. After his brother Robert was killed in World War II, and buried initially in Europe, Harry received a communication from the Army in May 1948 saying the body would be returned to the United States for burial. Sadly, Harry died at the age of 82, in Cumberland's Memorial Hospital, on Aug. 16, 1981. Burial was in Hyndman Cemetery, following a funeral preached by Rev. Timothy Stamper. He was survived by 13 children and 19 great-grandchildren. An obituary was printed in the Bedford County Inquirer. Ardelia lived for another 18 years. Death swept her away on March 26, 1999.

Great-granddaughter Mildred Tharp Smith was in Hyndman in 1981.

Great-granddaughter Helen Tharp Turner lived in Manns Choice, Bedford County.

Great-granddaughter Eleanor Tharp Waugerman resided in Buffalo Mills, Bedford County.

Great-granddaughter Shirley Tharp Robertson relocated to Cumberland, MD.

  • Granddaughter Emma Elizabeth Tharp (1901-1994) was born on Dec. 18, 1901 in Hyndman, Bedford County. She was joined in wedlock with William Merle Leckemby (1902-1947), son of William and Cora (Martz) Leckemby. Together they produced four offspring, among them William Leckemby Jr., Howard R. Leckemby, Mrs. Dale Kipp and Mrs. Lynwood Printy. During World War II, William served with the U.S. Army as a member of the 29th Division, 115th Infantry,a postal unit. He served for 30 months and was deployed to England. After the war, he was employed as a brakeman with the Pittsburgh Division of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The couple divorced, with William and his son William making a home together at 732Baker Street in Cumberland. Sadly, he died just two years after the war's end, without warning at the age of 44, on Feb. 21, 1947. What had happened was that he had been staying in the apartment of a friend on Cumberland's North Centre Street. They binge-drank steadily for several days. While trying to get up at some point, in a hazy alcoholic stupor, William fell and badly hurt his hip, and perhaps also his spine. Help was summoned, and he was admitted to Memorial Hospital. He told police what had happened. But three hours after he was admitted, he died. An autopsy ordered by the state attorney disclosed that pneumonia of the right lung was the cause of death. Emma lived for another 47 years. The angel of death carried her away into eternal life at the age of 92 on May 17, 1994. Her remains were lowered into the sacred soil of Hyndman Cemetery.

Great-grandson William Leckemby Jr. lived in Cumberland in 1947.

Great-grandson Howard Richard Leckemby dwelled in Hyndman in the mid-1940s.

Great-granddaughter (?) Leckemby married Dale Kipp. She made a home in Hyndman in 1947.

Great-granddaughter (?) Leckemby wedded Linwood Printy. They established a residence in Hyndman.

  • Grandson Edward Clair Tharp (1904-1979) was born on Oct. 18, 1904. When the federal census enumeration of 1940 was made, Edward was a bachelor at the age of 34 and dwelled with his widowed mother and single brother Robert in Hyndman. At that time, his occupation was as a roller operator for road construction, employed by the Works Progress Administration. The WPA was one of the ways President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and the federal government tried to overcome unemployment and is widely considered one of the Roosevelt's largest and most ambitious undertakings of his "New Deal" to get the nation back on sound economic footing. Over the years, the WPA hired millions of out-of-work individuals to build public works projects, such as roads, bridges, retaining walls and buildings. After the outbreak of World War II, he served as a private in the U.S. Army. He died at the age of 74 on July 21, 1979. Burial of the remains was in Comp's Cemetery near Wellersburg.
  • Robert Tharp
    Courtesy Edward W. Evans
    Grandson Robert Tharp (1910-1944) was born on Aug. 15, 1910 in Stringtown near Hyndman, Bedford County. He grew up in Hyndman and never married. In young manhood he was employed by Hyndman Borough as a truck driver and then by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad as a trackman. After the eruption of World War II, he joined the U.S. Army on Dec. 16, 1942 and was placed in Company G of the 89th Infantry. After basic training, Robert was shipped overseas to the European Theatre in March 1944. While fighting in France on the fateful day of July 26, 1944, he was killed in action. His name appeared in newspaper casualty lists in late August 1944. His remains initially were laid to rest in Europe. Then in May 1948, they were repatriated to the United States, with his older brother and next-of-kin Harry receiving the communication from the Army. His body was shipped across the ocean aboard the Lawrence Victory and thence to Hyndman. Burial was at Comp's Church, with the funeral services led by Rev. Leonard Wright. Members of the Oscar Jordan Post of the Veterans of Foreign Wars -- a post named for Robert's nephew, who also had been killed in World War II -- held military rites at the grave site. Related stories appeared in the Bedford (PA) Gazette and the Cumberland (MD) Sunday Times. On the 10th anniversary of his death, in 1954, a small item of remembrance was printed in the Cumberland Evening Times.

 

Comp Church Cemetery

Son Edward Emerick (1872-1920) was born in 1872. At the age of about 21, in 1895, he was united in marital union with Margaret Henrietta "Ettie" Weightman (June 10, 1876-1963), daughter of Samuel and Mary Ellen (Wanbaugh) Weightman of New Baltimore, Somerset County. Together, they produced a brood of four known children including Ross Emerick, Mary Elizabeth Browning, Lucy Shroyer and Florence Cecelia Divelbliss, plus one other who died young by 1910. The Emerick family resided in 1910-1920 on a farm in Southampton Township, with Edward's aged mother and brothers William and Lewis and their families living next door. Circa 1920, he served as executor of his parents' estate following the death of his mother. Later that year, he was employed as a coal miner in the High, Dry and Windy Mine near Ellerslie, Allegany County, MD. Reported the Meyersdale Republican, "As Edward Emerick was going to his place in the mine, a blast of dynamite went off prematurely and he received fatal injuries and died on the way to the hospital. He was buried Monday."

Ettie survived her spouse by more than four decades. Circa 1930, when the federal census enumeration was made, she was counted as living with her unmarried children Ross (age 33) and Mary (30) on a farm in Southampton, next door to her son Jesse and his wife Gertrude and their children. By 1940, only son Ross, age 42, was still in the family home. Horrifically, on the morning of Oct. 25, 1942, when her son did not return from the barn, she found him dead, hanging from a noose he had fashioned from a barn rope. As she aged, Ettie suffered with heart valve fibrillation and chronic heart disease. After catching a bad cold on April 11, 1963, she underwent acute cardiac failure and died at home on April 15, 1963. Her remains were placed into eternal repose beside her husband's, rejoined in death after a separation of 43 years.

  • Ross's marker, Comp's Cemetery
    Grandson Ross J. Emerick (1898-1942) was born on June 19, 1897 in Southampton Township. He never married. After the death of his father in 1920, Ross took primary responsibility for working the family farm in Southampton Township, sharing his home with his widowed mother and single sister Mary. He was a longtime member of Comp Reformed Church. In the late 1930s or early 1940s, he began to feel unwell. Nonetheless, he continued his farming life. But his mental state began to unravel in the fall of 1942, when he received in the mail an income tax return form and a U.S. military draft notice. He brooded over both. Then on the dark morning of Oct. 25, 1942, at the age of 45, he told his mother that he was going to the barn to feed livestock. When he did not return for breakfast, his mother and sister Mary went looking inside the barn and found him dangling dead, having hung himself from the hayloft using a hay rope, and jumping through the hay hole. The death made headlines in the Cumberland News, which reported that his mother" said her son had been in ill health for some time. Rev. Adolphus von Kaske, of Corriganville, led the funeral service.
  • Granddaughter Mary Elizabeth Emerick (1899-1982) was born on March 10, 1899 near Hyndman, Bedford County. Unmarried at the age of 42, in 1942, she lived on the home farm in Southampton with her mother and bachelor brother Ross. After Ross's tragic death to suicide in 1942, Mary made plans to wed. In 1944, she was joined in holy matrimony with William Daniel Browning (Feb. 22, 1900-1964), a U.S. Army veteran of World War II and the son of Henry J. and Catherine Ann "Katie" (Kiser) Browning of Fairhope. Their union lasted for two decades until the separation of death, and they resided in Fairhope, Somerset County. William earned a living as a railroad laborer. As William's health was afflicted by cancer of the upper lobe of his bronchial passage, he was admitted to the Veterans Administration Center in Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV. A dozen days later, on Oct. 21, 1964, when undergoing surgery, his heart stopped, possibly from the effect of an air embolism. His remains were transported back to Somerset County to sleep for eternity in Mt. Zion Cemetery in Fairhope.
  • Granddaughter Lucy Emerick (1903-1979) was born on June 25, 1902 or 1903 in Southampton Township. She entered into marriage with Nathaniel Shroyer ( ? -1952). Together, they bore a family of four -- Marshall Earl Shroyer, Sara Loretta Shroyer, Shirley I. Chaney and John Edward Shroyer. Nathaniel left the marriage and was court-oredered to pay $15 per month for support of his wife and children. Lucy sued for divorce circa May 1932, citing "desertion and non-support," as reported in the Somerset Daily American. After the divorce, Nathaniel went on to marry again on Sept. 20, 1945 with Grace Robb and father more children. In July 1950, Lucy purchased a family farm in Southampton Township from her mother for the token sum of a dollar, with the news reported in the Somerset Daily American. She signed her mother's official Pennsylvania death certificate in 1963 and at the time was living near Hyndman. She died at the age of 77, in Southampton, on Sept. 15, 1979. Burial was in Comp's Cemetery. Ex-husband Nathaniel died of a heart attack at home on Sept. 14, 1952.
  • Granddaughter Florence Cecelia Emerick (1905-1998) was born on Aug. 25, 1905 or 1908. She wedded John Theodore Divelbliss (May 6, 1903-1960). The couple did not reproduce. They dwelled in Londonderry Township near Hyndman, Bedford County. John earned income as the operator of groceries at a local gasoline filling station in 1940. John passed away at age 56 on April 7, 1960. Florence survived him by 38 years. She succumbed to death on May 17, 1998 at the age of 92. Burial was in Comp's Cemetery.

Son Albert James Emerick (1875-1957) was born in about 1875.

 

Irvin B.'s grave, Comp Church

Son Irvin Benjamin Emerick (1878-1928) was born on Oct. 4, 1878. He appears not to have married during his lifetime. His years were spent laboring as a farmer. At the age of 42, he lived alone in a dwelling in Southampton Township, Somerset County. Among his near neighbors were his brothers Jesse and Louis and cousin Earl Gaumer and their wives and children. Tragically, he was badly injured in an automobile accident in neighboring Londonderry, Bedford County, PA and succumbed to his injuries on May 17, 1928. Burial of the remains was in Comp's Cemetery. No obituary is known to have been published in local newspapers in Somerset or Bedford Counties. In June 1928, a notice about his estate was printed in the Meyersdale Republican, signed by his four brothers who were serving as co-executors, Jesse, Albert, Louis and William Emerick, all receiving their postal mail across the state line in Ellerslie, MD.

Son William H. Emerick (1880-1960) was born in March 1880 in the Comp's section of Southampton Township, Somerset County. His birth year also has been given as 1883. He was joined in the holy bonds of wedlock with Lydia Devore ( ? -1922). They resided near Southampton and Hyndman and held memberships in the Reformed Church. The nine children produced by this marriage, all daughters but two, were Raymond Emerick, Edna Wilson, Ethel Emerick, Nellie V. Nee, Howard F. Emerick, Marie Murray, Velma Dawson, Effie Sturtz and Dorothy Shaffer. Sadly, William died in Cumberland's Sacred Heart Hospital at the age of 76 on Feb. 25, 1960. An obituary in the Cumberland Evening Times reported that he "had been in ill health for some time." He was survived by 10 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. Preaching the funeral sermon was Rev. Louis L. Emerick of the Trinity Methodist Church of Cumberland. Intement of the remains was in Porter Cemetery.

  • Grandson Raymond Emerick made his home in Mt. Savage in 1960.
  • Granddaughter Edna Emerick married (?) Wilson. She dwelled in Flintstone, MD.
  • Granddaughter Ethel Emerick was unmarried and lived in 1960 in Somerset, PA.
  • Granddaughter Nellie V. Emerick wedded (?) Nee. She was in Cumberland, MD circa 1960.
  • Grandson Howard F. Emerick established a residence in Windber, Somerset County.
  • Granddaughter Marie Emerick was joined in wedlock with (?) Murray. She resided in 1960 in Ashtabula, OH.
  • Granddaughter Velma Emerick was united in matrimony with (?) Dawson. Her home was in Buffalo Mills, Bedford County.
  • Granddaughter Effie Emerick married (?) Sturtz. She put down roots in Wellersburg.
  • Granddaughter Dorothy Emerick wedded (?) Shaffer. She was in Hyndman, Bedford County in 1960.

Son Lewis S. Emerick (1881-1953) was born in March 1881. He was united in wedlock with Maud Myers (Dec. 29, 1882-1977), daughter of Samuel C. and Nanncy E. (Harden) Myersw. Together, they produced a family of children, including Hazel Elizabeth Wright, Rose Emerick, Carl Calvin Emerick, Rev. Samuel St. John Emerick and Louis L. Emerick. They resided on a farm in Southampton Township circa 1910. By 1920, the family migrated across the state line into Maryland and dwelled in Eckhart Mines, Allegany County, where Lewis was employed as a janitor in the local celanese plant, probably in the city of Cumberland. Lewis died in 1953. Burial of the remains was in Eckhart Mines Cemetery. Maud outlived him by 24 years. Death swept her away in Hagerstown, Washington County, MD in Nov. 1977. Inscribed on their grave marker are the words from the Christian hymn, "Blest be the tie that binds."

  • Granddaughter Hazel Elizabeth Emerick (1907-1981) was born in 1907. In about 1926, when she was 19 years old, she married 17-year-old Leonard Lee Wright (1909-1989). Their marital union endured for about 55 years until parted by death. Two known sons born in this family were Louis L. Wright and David R. Wright. Circa 1930, the newlyweds lived under the roof of Hazel's parents in Eckhart, Allegany County, MD, with Leonard working as a laborer in the celanese plant.
  • Grandson Carl Calvin Emerick Sr. (1910-1994) was born in 1910. He wedded Edith Elizabeth Rowan (1916-1984).
  • Granddaughter Rose Emerick (1911- ? ) was born in about 1911.
  • Grandson Rev. Samuel St. John Emerick (1915- ? ) was born on Sept. 5, 1915 near Comp's Church, Somerset County. He spent his adult life in Christian ministry. When he was 23 years of age, on Sept. 7, 1938, he entered into marriage with Mattie Lou "Patsy" Craig ( ? -2010), a native of Augusta County, VA and the daughter of Charles G. and Mattie (Carrier) Craig. Rev. John E. Myers, a Baptist minister from St. Albans, WV, officiated the nuptials. At the time, Samuel was living in Greenfield, IN and Patsy in Craigsville, VA. Their union survived for an extraordinary 71 years. Together, the couple bore three sons -- Craig Emerick, John Emerick and Stephen Emerick. Samuel spent his career in the North Indiana Conference of the United Methodist Church. His assignments took them to Philadelphia, Kendallville, Wabash, Decatur and Bluffton, IN. He accepted a position in 1957 as director of the Yokefellow Institute, on the campus of Earlham College in Richmond, IN, which was a church renewal center. He continued at Yokefellow until 1973. For a year, he held an Eli Lilly-endowed position in Indianapolis and then moved to Dayton, OH, where the served for four years as an adjunct professor of church renewal at United Theological Seminary. Reported a newspaper, "During a conference on poverty in 1965, Sam was profoundly influenced by Clarence Jordan of Koinonia Farm, Americus, Ga. In the years following that conference, Sam and several other visionaries continued to meet, eventually organizing an international board of directors which gave birth to Habitat for Humanity." Their final years were spent in retirement in Port Charlotte, FL. There, he held a part-time post with the Port Charlotte United Methodist Church and helped form Habitat chapters in the counties of Lee, Collier, Sarasota and Charlotte. Sadly, Patsy died at the age of 93 on Feb. 8, 2010. He passed into eternity at the age of 96 on Jan. 13, 2012. Burial of their remains was in Craigsville Cemetery in Virginia.
  • Grandson Louis L. "J.R." Emerick (1927- ? ) was born in 1927 in Maryland. He married Eleanor. Circa 2020, he was in San Mar, MD.

Daughter Bertha M. Emerick (1882-1973) was born in about 1882. She was joined in wedlock with (?) Bloom ( ? - ? ). Her home in 1954-1960 was in Corriganville, Allegany County, MD.

 

Jesse and Gertrude's grave, Comp's Cemetery near Wellersburg

 

 

Vernon's grave, Comp Church

Son Jesse Emerick (1884-1972) was born the day after Christmas 1884. He may also have gone by the name "Jefferson." In 1907, when he was age 22 or 23, he was joined in matrimony with Gertrude L. "Gertie" Lepley (June 23, 1889-1969). The couple's known children were Vernon "Curtis" Emrick, Alberta Emerick and Gladys Emerick. When the federal census enumerations were made in 1910-1920, the family was counted in Southampton Township, Somerset County. Jesse earned a living in 1910 as a fire clay miner. Death shook the family in late March 1922 when 15-year-old son Curtis contracted pneumonia and died. In 1930, still on a farm in Southampton, they lived next door to Jesse's widowed mother, and also provided a home for 50-year-old Charles W. Beal. Gertrude died on Feb. 24, 1969, bringing to a close their marriage which had survived the ups and downs of an extraordinary 61 years. Burial was in Comp's Cemetery. Jesse lived for another three years, minus three days. The angel of death cut him away on Feb. 21, 1972. Inscribed on their grave marker is a scripture verse from Matthew 25:46: "The righteous soul shall go into life eternal."

  • Grandson Vernon "Curtis" Emrick (1907-1922) was born on March 15, 1907. He grew up in Comp's, Southampton Township, reaching his teen years. But he was not destined for adulthood. In late March 1922, at age 15, he was stricken by a serious case of bronchial pneumonia. He suffered for five days, but there was no hope. He passed away at 6 a.m. on March 31, 1922. Burial was two days later in Comp Church Cemetery. A short obituary was published in the Meyersdale Republican., which named his parents and sisters. An epitaph was carved on the bottom of the grave marker's face, reading: "Weep not Father and Mother for me, For I am waiting in glory for thee."
  • Granddaughter Alberta/Alverta Emerick (1908- ? ) was born in about 1908.
  • Granddaughter Gladys Emerick (1918- ? ) was born in 1918.

 

Cook Cemetery

~ Daughter Rebecca (Emerick) Knieriem ~

Daughter Rebecca A. Emerick (1843-1932) was born in December 1843

At the age of 18 in 1861, Rebecca married German immigrant Peter D. Knieriem (1836-1916), of unknown parentage but a native of Hesse Cassel. Aboard the ship Johannes, he came to the United States in 1855 at the age of 16, arriving in Baltimore, declaring himself a coal miner and his destination as Frostburg, MD.

In 1860, the unmarried Peter at age 21 boarded in the home of his future wife's uncle and aunt, Jacob and Eliza Emerick in Southampton and worked as a farm laborer. They were longtime farmers and dwelled in Wellersburg, Somerset County. Neither was able to read or write.

Their known children were Rachel Knieriem, Annie C. Knieriem, Mary E. "Laura" Bradour, Margaret Alice "Maggie" Witt, Clara M. Knieriem, Lottie R. Knieriem, Eva Jeannette Boger, John P. Knieriem and Louis C. Knieriem.

In 1880, census records show Peter, Rebecca and their six daughters in the household along with servant Benjamin Huff. Considered to be widely respected in the community, Peter was a member of the Odd Fellows of Meyersdale, Somerset County, for 47 years. They family also was affiliated with the Reformed Church.

Rebecca was named in the 1913 Meyersdale Republican obituary of her brother Nathan as living in Wellersburg.

Stricken with cancer on the side of his face at age 79, Peter succumbed in Wellersburg on March 7, 1916. His remains were placed into rest in Cook's Cemetery in American soil to which he had come some 61 years earlier. His nephews Henry Knieriem of New York City and Henry Rinker of New Jersey traveled to attend the funeral.

Rebecca survived him by 17 years, and endured the heartache of her daughter's mental illness and eventual death in the county home. At the age of 89, Rebecca suffered a stroke and died on Sept. 15, 1932. Interment was in Cook Cemetery in Wellersburg, following funeral services held in the Wellersburg Reformed Church. Her daughter Laura, living in Cumberland, MD, signed the death certificate, and a short obituary was printed in the Meyersdale Republican. [Find-a-Grave]

Daughter Rachel Knieriem (1862- ? ) was born in about 1862.

Daughter Annie C. Knieriem (1865- ? ) was born in about 1865.

Daughter Mary Ellen "Laura" Kneriem (1868- ? ) was born in about 1868 in Wellersburg. In abouit 1891, when she would have been age 22 or 23, she was married to George "William" Bradour (1858-1928), who was a decade her senior in age. Their offspring were Marie Shaffer, Naomi (Mrs. Richard H.) Mathews, Guy W. Bradour, Paul W. Bradour and Willard M. Bradour. In 1916, they lived near Cumberland, Allegany County, MD. The Bradours were members of St. Luke's Lutheran Church. Federal census records for 1920 show their address as Bedford Road and William's occupation as "truck farmer" -- growing vegetables for commercial sale. Sadness enveloped the family in 1928 at George's death. By 1932, the widowed Laura relocated to Roanoke, VA where her married sister Maggie Witt had resided for some time. At some point she returned to Cumberland During World War II, Laura worried as her son served for two years in the China-Burma-India theatre of war. In September 1945, Laura made her home on Bedford Street in Cumberland when her son Paul married Stella Mae Bortz. She made her home in her final years at 1414 Bedford Street in Cumberland. On Sept. 9, 1950, the 82-year-old Laura died at home. Rev. Dr. H. Hall Sharp of the family church officiated at the funeral, followed by burial in the church cemetery. An obituary in the Cumberland Sunday Times noted that she was survived by five adult children, all living in Cumberland, and by five grandchildren and one great-granddaughter.

  • Granddaughter Marie Bradour wedded (?) Shaffer
  • Granddaughter Naomi Bradour married Richard H. Mathews
  • Grandson Guy W. Bradour
  • Grandson Paul W. Bradour
  • Grandson Willard M. Bradour

Daughter Margaret Alice "Maggie" Knieriem (1870-1953) was born on May 16, 1870. On Nov. 24, 1891, at the age of 21, Maggie was joined in wedlock with 33-year-old widower Levi Witt (1857-1944), son of John G. and Rebecca Margaret (Shaffer) Witt. Rev. B. Knepper officiated at the nuptials held at the Knieriem residence. At the time, Levi made his home in Roanoke, an independent city in Virginia, where he labored as a blacksmith, while Maggie lived in Wellersburg. His first wife, Mary Ella (Gaumer) Witt, had died Oct. 31, 1888, and he brought two children to the marriage -- Nellie V. Witt and Ida Gertrude Witt, both of whom died within a few years. The couple left Pennsylvania to establish residence in Levi's community in Roanoke. They produced three more offspring of their own -- Ruth Witt, Ralph K. Witt and Margaret Witt. When the federal census was taken in 1910, the Witts' abode was on Jefferson Street in Roanoke, with 63-year-old Levi having no occupation, but daughter Ruth teaching in a public school. The Witts remained in Roanoke for several more decades and are shown there in the 1930 census. By that time, their address had changed to First Street. Levi died in 1944, with burial in Roanoke's Evergreen Burial Park. Maggie survived as a widow for nine years and died on Aug. 5, 1953. [Find-a-Grave]

  • Step-granddaughter Nellie V. Witt
  • Step-granddaughter Ida Gertrude Witt
  • Granddaughter Ruth Witt
  • Grandson Ralph K. Witt
  • Granddaughter Margaret Witt

Daughter Clara M. Knieriem (1873- ? ) was born in November 1873 in Pennsylvania. In about 1894, when she was 21 years of age, she was united in marriage with 23-year-old Charles H. Evans (1871- ? ), a native of West Virginia. The couple produced these known children -- Charline S. Evans, Beulah C.M. Evans, Harold K. Evans and Glen F. Evans. In 1900, U.S. Census records show the family on Market Street in McKeesport, near Pittsburgh, with Charles earning a living as a cook, and Clara's younger unmarried sister Nettie Eva under their roof. Between 1905 and 1910, the Evanses relocated to Cumberland, Allegany County, MD, with Charles having obtained a job as a cook in a local hotel. That year, they lived in a rented dwelling on Bedford Street.

  • Granddaughter Charline S. Evans
  • Granddaughter Beulah C.M. Evans
  • Grandson Harold K. Evans
  • Grandson Glen F. Evans

Daughter Charlotte R. "Lottie" Knieriem (1878- ? ), was born in about 1878. She was united in holy matrimony with James L. Harper (1878-1938), son of Scottish immigrants John and Jean (Love) Harper of Lonaconing, MD. They produced three known children -- James K. Harper, Raymond L. Harper and Charlotte V. Novak. Circa 1916, their home was in Pittsburgh. James obtained new employment as a molder with the Thew Shovel Company and the family relocated to Elyria, Lorain County, OH. Their address in 1938 was 136 Pasadena Avenue in Lorain. Sadly, James suffered from chronic heart disease and died in Elyria Memorial Hospital at the age of 60 on May 19, 1938. Interment was in Ridge Hill Park Cemetery. The 1940 federal census shows the widowed Lottie heading a household in Elyria, with her adult children living under her roof -- James (a sprayer for a tank manufacturer), Raymond (clerk in a retail drey goods store) and son in law and daughter Arthur R. and Charlotte Novak (he a molder in an alloy manufacturing company).

  • Grandson James K. Harper
  • Grandson Raymond L. Harper
  • Granddaughter Charlotte V. Harper Novak

 

Somerset County Home, Eva Jeannette Boger's homeplace in her final years

 

Daughter Eva Jeannette "Nettie" Knieriem (1880-1926) sometimes spelled "Canary," was born in April 1880 in Wellersburg. At the age of 20, in 1900, she was unmarried and dwelled with her married sister and children in McKeesport near Pittsburgh. She was united in matrimony with Herbert Daniel Boger (1880-1939), son of Henry H. and Lydia B. (Dickey) Boger of Brothersvalley Township, Somerset County. They resided in Meyersdale, Somerset County, where Peter earned a living as a coal miner. Tragically, Eva Jeannette suffered from mental illness, and perhaps as early as March 1924 was admitted to the Somerset County Home and Hospital. She was treated there by Henry Wilson, M.D., of Somerset. Eva Jeannette died in the Home on Nov. 6, 1926, at the age of 46, caused by "general paralysis of the insane," ruled a physician. Burial followed in Union Cemetery in Meyersdale. Herbert lived for another baker's dozen of years. He retired from mining in 1931, when he was only age 51, perhaps as the mines shut down during the Great Depression. Suffering from heart disease and hardening of the arteries, he passed into eternity at age 58 on New Year's Day 1939. [Find-a-Grave]

Son John Peter Knieriem (1882-1963) was three days after Christmas in 1882 near Wellersburg. He stood five feet, seven inches tall, weighed 145 lbs, had grey eyes, black hair and a ruddy complexion. At age 17, he lived at home on the farm and provided farm labor. On Jan. 22, 1908, when he would have been age 26, John married 20-year-old Lyda D. Arnold (1888-1976), daughter of William H. and Rhoda M. (Mahaney) Arnold. The nuptials were celebrated at the First Methodist Church on Bedford Street in Cumberland, MD, with Rev. W.A. Melvin officiating. Attendants were Carrie (White) Shade and Lawrence H. Stutz. Their nine known children, all born in Maryland, were Kathryn Hixson, Lt. Col. John Peter Knieriem Jr., Donald L. Knieriem, Mary E. Weimer, Martha L. McNeill, Robert Brooke Knieriem, Albert "Henry" Knieriem and two who died young. They made their home for decades in Cumberland. The federal census of 1930 shows John at age 48 earning income by work as a building construction laborer. In 1930 and '40, they dwelled along Willowbrook Road, where he was a self-employed farmer. John belonged to St. Paul's Lutheran Church were he was a member of the Duke Memorial Bible Class. Lyda was a member of the Cumberland chapter of the Order of Eastern Star and of Kingsley Methodist Church. By 1940, John had taken on a new occupation as a dairy farm operator in Cumberland. The family was covered in worry during World War II when son John Jr. took part in the invasion of France and later saw action in Germany. He was named in the Cumberland (MD) Sunday Times obituary of his sister Mary Ellen Bradour in 1950 and lived in Cumberland. Sadly, John died in November 1963. Yet confusion abounds as five-plus years later, on Jan. 22, 1969, the couple was reported to have quietly celebrated their 61st wedding anniversary. Lyda lived for three more years at their home at 475 Willowbrook Road. At the age of 88, she died in Cumberland Nursing Home on Aug. 31, 1976. Her obituary was printed in the Cumberland News.

  • Granddaughter Kathryn Hixson
  • Grandson Lt. Col. John Peter Knieriem Jr.
  • Grandson Donald L. Knieriem
  • Granddaughter Mary E. Weimer
  • Granddaughter Martha L. McNeill
  • Grandson Robert Brooke Knieriem
  • Grandson Albert "Henry" Knieriem

Son Louis C. Knieriem (1885-1964) was born in September 1885 in Wellersburg. He never married. In 1940, federal census records show the 55-year-old boarding in the home of Walter and Edith Sturtz along Old Plank Road in Wellersburg, with no occupation. He was admitted to the Somerset County Home in about 1942 and remained there for the rest of his life. In 1950, when mentioned in the Cumberland (MD) Sunday Times obituary of his sister Mary Ellen Bradour, he was living in Somerset, PA. He died in January 1964 and, following funeral services conducted by Rev. John A. Klindt of the Church of Christ, was buried with his parents in Cook Cemetery. An obituary in the Cumberland News noted that his sister in law Lyda Knieriem of Cumberland and several nieces and nephews were his only survivors.

 

~ Son Lafayette Emrick ~

Son Lafayette Emerick (or "Emrick") (1847-1944) was born on Jan. 6, 1847, on the old homestead of his grandparents, Andrew and Christina (Heller) Emerick in Southampton Township. His birth was recorded in the papers of St. Luke's Lutheran Church of Cumberland, MD.

As a boy, he learned how to operate his father's sawmill, gristmill and fuller mill.

Lafayette was twice wed. His first wife was Mary Clites (1845-1899), who was three years older. She was the daughter of Samuel and Sarah Ann (Shroyer) Clites.

Their known children were Martha Ellen Emerick, Sarah Cordilla Emerick, Levi Franklin "Frank" Emerick, Charles Emerick, George Emerick, Effie Geneva "Nettie" Shaffer and Russell Calvin Emerick.

They were longtime farmers. Circa 1879, Lafayette and his brothers, Gaumer cousins and others helped erect a new house of worship for the community, known as Comp's Lutheran and Reformed Church.

In 1880, the Emricks lived in Southampton Township, also providing a home for Lafayette's aging parents and his 56-year-old unmarried brother Nathan. In 1880, they lived next to Lafayette's married brother John and sister Mary E. Emerick and their families.

 

Fairhope, Lafayette's home circa 1910

Tragedy rocked the family in about 1899 when Mary, age 56, is said to have been struck by a bolt of lightning and died. Her remains were placed into rest in the Comp's Cemetery in Southampton Township.

As a widower, Lafayette eventually moved a short distance north to the town of Fairhope, Somerset County. He purchased a home near the Fairhope Church. After some years alone, he married again, to Emma Johnson Thomas (March 1878-1956), reputedly an immigrant from Sweden.

In 1911, they produced one son, Gilbert Emerick.

Lafayette was named in the 1913 Meyersdale Republican obituary of his brother Nathan as living in Glen Savage, Somerset County.

Lafayette and his youngest son Gilbert relocated to Indiana. They sold their property in Allegheny Township for $800 and then purchased in 1928 a residence in Helmer, Stueben County, said to have been a mile northwest of town on the South Milford Road. His nephew George W. Emerick also owned a farm in Helmer about a mile east of Lafayette's.

Lafayette died in Gilbert's home two days after his 97th birthday on Jan. 8, 1944. Interment was in the Wright Cemetery in Hudson, Steuben County. An obituary in the Angola (IN) Herald noted that funeral services were held in the United Brethren Church in Helmer, officiated by Rev. M.E. Burkett.

Evidence suggests that Emma spent her final years in Canton, Stark County, OH and died there on June 7, 1956.

Daughter Martha Ellen Emerick (1868-1941) was born on March 27, 1868 in Kennels Mill, Somerset County. She married Silas Walter Shroyer (1863-1931), son of Joseph and Catherine Ann (Smith) Shroyer. They were longtime farmers and lived in Fairhope, Somerset County and had these known children -- Clara (Shroyer) Emerick Burley, Mamie Hurt, Nettie Smith, Elmer Shroyer, Cora Diehl, Joseph Shroyer and Raymond Shroyer. Sadly, Silas passed away at age 68 in Fairhope on May 28, 1931. After funeral services held in the home, his remains were placed into repose in the Madley Cemetery near Hyndman, Bedford County. The deputy coroner wrote: "Had suffered with asthma and dropsy for a number of years. For the past month limbs were so swollen he was unable to walk. Which would indicate dropsy caused his death." The Bedford Gazette published an obituary. Martha Ellen outlived him by a decade. In later years, suffering from heart disease and hardening of the arteries, she made her home with her married daughter Clara Shroyer in Fairhope. Martha Ellen died at the age of 73 on July 19, 1941. An obituary was printed in the Cumberland (MD) Sunday Times

Daughter Sarah "Cordilla" Emerick (1870-1907) was born on April 29, 1870. She was married to Benjamin Mills ( ? - ? ). They dwelled in Fairhope, Somerset County. At the age of 37, while suffering a miscarriage, septic shock set in, and her health collapsed. She died on Dec. 2, 1907. Burial was in Comp's Church Cemetery. Benjamin has faded from history's view for now.

 

Lybarger Lutheran Church, site of Frank Emerick's funeral and burial

 

Son Levi Franklin "Frank" Emerick (1873-1945) was born in Jan. 1873. When he was 24 years of age, in about 1897, he was united in holy wedlock with 18-year-old Laura Ellen Shroyer (1877-1931). They were the parents of Nellie Emerick and Charles William Emerick plus one other who died young prior to 1910. The United States Censuses of 1900 and 1910 shows the family in Allegheny Township, Somerset County, PA. They owned their own farm in 1900 but by 1910 were residing on a farm where they sharecropped. They grieved on Oct. 4, 1909 at the untimely death of their 11-year-old daughter Nellie. Circa 1920-1945, they and their son Charles shared a home on the family farm near Madley, Bedford County, PA. Frank earned a living over the years as a farmer and blacksmith. Grief blanketed the family when Laura Ellen died at the age of 53 on March 13, 1931. Burial was in Madley Cemetery in Buffalo Mills. Frank outlived her by 14 years. Tragically, on the fateful day of April 11, 1945, he was badly burned while laboring on the home farm. Reported the Bedford Gazette, "he was working at his blacksmith shop and dropped a piece of iron upon the leaves near the forge. The flames spread to a nearby barn and Mr. Emerick was severely burned as he was attempting to save a horse that was trapped inside the blazing structure.... [He] suffered third degree burns of the face, skull and both hands...." He was rushed to Cumberland's Memorial Hospital, and the Gazette said that "His condition is serious." He died that evening. The body was transported to Hyndman for funeral services held in the Lybarger Lutheran Church. Rev. Petrea of Schellsburg presided over the service. Burial was in the church cemetery.

  • Granddaughter Nellie Irene Emerick (1898- ? ) was born in about April 1898. She died at the age of 11 on Oct. 4, 1909. The cause of her untimely passing is not yet known.
  • Grandson Charles William Emerick (1911- ? ) was born in about 1911. He was widowed by 1940, and shared a home with his widowed father near Madley, Bedford County. The federal census enumeration of 1940 shows that Charles earned a living as a laborer with the Works Progress Administration.

Son Charles Emerick (1875- ? ) was born in 1875. He was deceased by 1944, and conceivably could have died in childhood or young manhood.

George E. Emerick's workplace, the B&O Railroad yards in Connellsville, PA

 

Son George E. Emerick (1877-1937) was born on Sept. 20, 1877 in Glenn Savage, Somerset County. He married Mary Ada Miller ( ? - ? ). They resided at 1122 Vine Street in Connellsville, Fayette County. Reported the Connellsville Daily Courier, he "had been in the service of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad for 36 years -- five years as a brakeman and 31 years as a conductor." He was a member of the Order of Railroad Conductors and of the local orders of the Eagles and Knights of Pythias. For two years before his death, he endured hypertension and "cardiac insufficiency." He contracted a deadly case of influenza in early January 1937 and was forced to stay home from work a few days later. Unable to rally, he succumbed on Jan. 19, 1937 at the age of 60. After funeral services at the residence, which included rites by the Eagles, his remains were returned to Somerset County for interment in Pleasant Ridge Cemetery, led by Rev. E.A. Schultz, of the United Brethren Church. Ada Emerick signed his death certificate.

Daughter Effie Geneva "Nettie" Emerick (1883-1944) -- also more commonly known as "Jeannette" -- was born on April 14, 1883 in Somerset County. On or about Dec. 23, 1909, at the age of 26, she wedded 25-year-old farmer William "Henry" Shaffer (Oct. 28, 1884-1965) of Connellsville, Fayette County and the son of Solomon B. and Clarissia (Christner) Shaffer. Together, this couple bore four known children -- Kenneth Solomon Shaffer, Evelyn Mae McCune, Rosella Mildred Shaffer and Martha Evelyn Cramer. The family mourned at the loss of infant daughter Rosella in 1914. Upon marriage, they immediately established a residence near Dawson, Fayette County, at times considered part of the community of Scottdale, Westmoreland County, PA, and remained for good. William was employed as a teamster in a planing mill in 1910. By 1920, he had turned to farming. Jeannette was mentioned in her father's Indiana newspaper obituary in 1944. Their home at that time was in rural Dawson, Fayette County. Having contracted influenza and acute kidney disease, Jeannette surrendered to death just a few weeks shy of her 61st birthday on March 29, 1944. Burial was in Shaffer Cemetery near Indian Head, with Rev. J.J. Wimmer officiating, and an obituary appearing in the Somerset Daily American.

  • Grandson Solomon "Kenneth" Shaffer (1911-1997) was born on Jan. 20, 1911 in Scottdale, East Huntington Township, Westmoreland County. In young manhood he stood 5 feet, 8 inches tall and weighed 132 lbs., with blue eyes and brown hair. He entered into the union of marriage with Emma Josephine Stouffer (1920-1993). The children born to this couple were Shirley Marie Hiles Thomas, William Kenneth Shaffer, Judy Shaffer, Donald George Shaffer and perhaps two others. The family put down roots in Bear Rocks in the rural outskirts of Mount Pleasant, Westmoreland County, PA. Their house was near the Kreinbrook school. Circa 1940, with the nation still in the lingering grip of the Great Depression, Kenneth earned a living through employment with the Works Progress Administration in Clinton, Fayette County. Sadly, the spectre of death visited the family twice in 1943 and 1944. Daughter Judy died at birth in 1943. A year later, three-year-old son William fell at home and was badly injured, with an infection of peritonitis setting in. He passed away while riding home from a physician's examination on Feb. 23, 1944. The boy's remains were lowered into eternal peace in Shaffer Cemetery in Indian Head.

Great-granddaughter Shirley Marie Shaffer (1938-2010) was born on April 25, 1938. At the age of 19, she is known to have eloped to Winchester, VA in May 1957 to marry 26-year-old Lewis M. Hiles, son of Edward and Helen (McIntyre) Hiles of Ruffsdale. Later, she wedded (?) Thomas ( ? - ? ). She died in Connellsville on Nov. 15, 2010.

Great-grandson Donald George Shaffer (1947-1994) was born on Jan. 6, 1947 in Mount Pleasant, Westmoreland County, PA. He resided in Adelaide near Connellsville, Fayette County. He passed away on Jan. 28, 1994. His remains are in repose in Stouffer Cemetery.

  • Granddaughter Evelyn Mae Shaffer (1912-1979) was born in 1912. She wedded (?) McCune ( ? - ? ). She dwelled in Ruffsdale, Fayette County in 1944.
  • Granddaughter Martha Evelyn Shaffer (1916-2000) was born in 1916. She married (?) Cramer ( ? - ? ). She resided circa 1944 in Scottdale, Westmoreland County.

Son Russell Calvin Emerick (1886-1961) was born on March 27, 1886 in Glen Savage, PA. He married Florence May Baker (Oc. 15, 1891-1969), daughte of Albert M. and Georgiana (Beal) Baker. Their known children were Irene Valentine, Vernon R. Emerick, Victor Emerick, Lester C. Emerick. He labored as a machine runner in a coal mine in Wellersburg, Southampton Township during the 1930s. Circa 1940, they resided on Old Plank Road in Wellersburg and provided a home for their three-year-old grandson, Teddy Theorig. Daughter Irene was employed as a twister in a silk mill in 1940, and Russell continued to labor as a coal miner. When his brother Frank died of burns suffered in a farm accident, Russell was named in the Bedford Gazette obituary. His final home was in Wellersburg. In May 1961, stricken with cancer of the bladder, Russell was admitted to the Somerset County Home in Berlin. There, despite treatment, he died at age 75 on July 31, 1961. His remains were placed into eternal rest in Cook Cemetery in Wellersburg, with Rev. Charles Raley presiding, and an obituary appearing in the Cumberland Evening Times. Florence lived for another eight years. Death carried her away on Oct. 5, 1969. The Meyersdale Republican and Cumberland News published obituaries, saying she was survived by 10 grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren, three step-grandchildren and four step-great-grandchildren. Officiating was Rev. John Weaver of the Grace United Methodist Church in Hyndman.

  • Grandson Victor A. Emerick (1911- ? ) was born in about 1911. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II, and was stationed in 1944 in Norfolk, VA. He was deployed to the South Pacific Theatre. Victor was pictured in a Cumberland Sunday Times story in May 1944 about how tall he and his brother Vernon were. Victor dwelled in 1961-1969 in Rockville, MD. He is believed to have been married first to Geneva ( ? - ? ). He sued her for divorce in May 1948 in Allegany County Circuit Court. Evidence suggests that his second bride was Roberta R. ( ? - ? ). He filed for divorce in Oct. 1954, again in the Allegany circuit court.
  • Grandson Lester C. Emerick (1915-1967) was born on Feb. 22, 1915 in Connellsville. He made a home in adulthood in Wellersburg and worked in Cumberland at the Kelly Springfield Tire Company plant. Evidence suggests that he married Florence Lowery ( ? - ? ). The couple's brood of offspring included Donald Emerick, Leslie Emerick, Fay Emerick, Patricia Ann Perdew, Paulette McCoy and Beverly Sue Kiefer. The couple divorced, and Florence then wedded Lester's brother Vernon. Sadly, he suffered a debilitating illness for the last eight years of his life. He was admitted to Cumberland's Sacred Heart Hospital and passed away there, at the age of 52, on Aug. 22, 1967. His remains were lowered under the sod in Rest Lawn Memorial Gardens, following a funeral presided over by Rev. John A. Klindt. An obituary in the Meyersdale Republican failed to name his ex-wife or brother but did say he was survived by 13 grandchildren in addition to his brother Victor and sister Irene.

Great-grandson Donald Emerick lived in Wellersburg in 1967.

Great-grandson Leslie Emerick resided in 1967 in Wellersburg.

Great-grandson Fay Emerick relocated to Cumberland.

Great-granddaughter Patricia Ann Emerick wedded (?) Perdew. Their home in 1967 was at Patrick Air Force Base in Florida.

Great-granddaughter Paulette Emerick married (?) McCoy. Circa 1967, she was in Hyndman.

Great-granddaughter Beverly Sue Emerick entered into wedlock with (?) Kiefer. She dwelled in rural Bedford.

  • Granddaughter Irene Emerick (1917- ? ) was born in about 1917. She was employed as a twister in a silk mill in 1940. She married Charles Valentine ( ? - ? ). They lived in Barrelville, MD in 1961-1968 and in Hyndman in 1969.
  • Grandson Vernon R. Emerick (1919-1968) was born in 1919 in Wellersburg. He served in the U.S. Armed Forces during World War II, standing 6 feet, 6 in ches tall. He wedded Florence Lowery ( ? - ? ). Having been married before to Vernon's brother, she brought six children into the second union -- Donald Emerick, Leslie Emerick, Fay Emerick, Beverly Sue Kiefer, Patricia Perdew and Paulette McCoy. Vernon became seriously ill and was admitted to the Veterans Administration Center in Martinsburg, Berkeley County. A week later, he died there at the age of 49 on Dec. 1, 1968. His obituary was printed in the Meyersdale Republican. Rev. Kenneth Korns led the funeral, with interment in Rest Lawn Memorial Gardens. The Bedford Honor Guard and Hyndman post of the Veterans of Foreign Wars provided rites at the graveside.

Son Gilbert C. Emerick (1911-1988) was born in 1911. He was 43 years younger than his eldest half-sister. He and his father relocated to Indiana by 1937, making a home in Helmer, Steuben County in 1928. The father died in Gilbert's residence in Hamilton, IN in January 1944. On Jan. 6, 1940, Gilbert was joined in wedlock with Dorothy Herma (Lower) Stourse (1907-1986), a native of Clare, Clare County, MI and the widow of George Lyman Strouse (1905-1937). The wedding was led by Rev. William Wenger in the parsonage of the Lutheran Church in West Fairfield, IN. In announcing the marriage, the Angola Herald said that "They will reside in Helmer." Dorothy is believed to have brought a daughter into the marriage, Betty Strouse. Sadly, Dorothy succumbed to the spectre of death in 1986. Gilbert survived her by about two years. He died at the age of 76 or 77 in 1988. Burial of the remains was in Wright Cemetery in Hudson, Steuben County.

  • Step-granddaughter Betty Strouse ( ? - ? ) grew up in or near Angola, Steuben County, IN.

 

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We are grateful for records provided by Gilbert R. Gaumer of Glendale, MO (compiled 1973-1980), Paul K. Gaumer and Mary L. Shirer in the preparation of this biography.

The Gaumer and Hoyman clans are profiled in the 486-page book Some Notes, Quotes, and Quips of the Hoyman Clan and Related Lines, authored by David LeRoy Baldwin and published by Gateway Press in 1993.

 

Copyright 2000, 2011, 2015-2017, 2021 Mark A. Miner

Minerd.com thanks Donna Londeen, Courtney Moen, James Phebus, Barbara (Moss) Wardsworth, Keith Sturts, Robert "Bud" Evans and the late Gilbert R. Gaumer for their contributions to this biography.